Woodland, CA


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Woodland (formerly Yolo City) is the county seat of Yolo County, California, located approximately 15 miles (24 km) northwest of Sacramento, and is a part of the Sacramento - Arden-Arcade - Roseville Metropolitan Statistical Area. The population was 55,468 at the 2010 census.
Woodland's origins trace back to 1850 when California gained its statehood and Yolo County was established. Since the town started growing in population and resources, it has not stopped. The area was well irrigated due to the efforts of James Monroe, and this drew people out to try their hand at farming. The endeavor was successful as people found the soil in the area very fertile. The city gained a federal post office and the next year the county seat was moved from Washington (present day West Sacramento, California) to Woodland after Washington was flooded. The addition of a railroad line, the close proximity to Sacramento, and the more recent addition of Interstate 5, helped create a thriving city.
Before the settlement of the area by people of European descent, the Woodland area was inhabited by the Patwin, a subgroup of the Wintun Native Americans. There are two main groups of Patwin: River and Coastal Patwin. Woodland's indigenous roots stem from the River Patwin who tended to stay closer to the Sacramento River, as opposed to the Coastal Patwin who lived in small valleys in hills and ranges. The Yolotoi, a tribelet of the Patwin, occupied area near Woodland, and settled a village northwest of Woodland and another close to present day Knights Landing. Although they didn't have a permanent settlement in present day Woodland, it is believed that the River Patwin occupied the Woodland area in seasonal camps for hunting and seed gathering. The Yolotoi and their neighboring tribelets had a main trading trail which followed Cache Creek. The exchange of goods between the neighboring tribes of the Nomlaki to the north, the Nisenan to the east, and the Pomo to the west also served as a way of cultural and social interchange between all the tribes. The simultaneous enslavement and spread of disease through the Patwin by the Spanish missionaries had quickly taken dramatic effects; a malarial epidemic in 1830-33 and a smallpox epidemic in 1837 killed much of the surviving natives. However, it has been found that some of the first farm hands in the earliest farms in Woodland were the Patwin people.