25 Most Dangerous Cities In The US In 2020

The United States is ripe with amazing cities to live in and travel to (in fact, here are some of our favorite cities to visit in the US). Despite ongoing concerns over firearm violence in America, the country as a whole is safer than you might realize. In fact, with a violent crime rate of 369 incidents committed for every 100,000 people in 2018, the U.S. is statistically the safest it’s been in the last three decades. Unfortunately, safety can look quite different at a local level than it does nationally. When it comes to individual cities, there are definitely some that are considered more dangerous than others.

Using the FBI’s most recent crime data from its 2018 Uniform Crime Reporting Program, we’ve ranked the cities with the highest violent crime rates in the country. This population-adjusted statistic measures all violent crimes and is a useful tool for determining how dangerous a city is.

We should note that just because a city is declared dangerous, doesn’t mean it should be avoided altogether. You’ll find there are safe neighborhoods in even the worst cities. Still, we’d recommend exercising caution if you’re thinking of traveling to one of the following 25 cities, which rank as the most dangerous cities in the U.S. in 2020.

25. Chattanooga, Tennessee

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,048
Property Crimes Per 100k: 6,058

Surrounded by mountains and nestled along the Tennessee River, Chattanooga more than lives up to its official nickname of “Scenic City”. However, those looking to explore the great outdoors in Chattanooga should take heed of the city’s high violent crime rate. While homicides were low, the city experienced 783 cases of aggravated assault per 100,000 people in 2018 — more than triple the national average.

The good news is that local authorities are taking steps to address the problem. More than 30 surveillance cameras have been installed across the city over the last three years to help increase public safety in Chattanooga’s most dangerous areas.

Source: Shutterstock

24. Beaumont, Texas

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,059
Property Crimes Per 100k: 3,783

With a violent crime rate of 1,059 per 100,000 residents, Beaumont just narrowly tops Houston as the most dangerous major city in the Lone Star state. Much like Chattanooga, Beaumont has an aggravated assault problem, with a whopping 798 reported in 2018. In 2019, Beaumont has also experienced more homicides than the previous year and city officials are desperate to change the narrative.

“Per ca-pita, we are the murder capital of the state of Texas, and we want to change that, we’re not satisfied with that,” said Jefferson County District Attorney Bob Wortham.

The Beaumont Police Department has implemented a high tech tool to help curb firearm violence. Known as the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network, the tool allows authorities to better track firearms used in different crimes.

Source: Shutterstock

23. Tulsa, Oklahoma

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,065
Property Crimes Per 100k: 5,430

While it may not be under attack by masked criminals like in HBO’s hit 2019 series Watchmen, the real-life city of Tulsa is still a dangerous place. In fact, based on its violent crime rate, Tulsa is the most dangerous major city in the state of Oklahoma.

While there’s a lot to love about Tulsa, including a thriving craft beer scene and a world-renowned art museum, its violent crime rate is not one of them. Firearm violence, in particular, has been a major problem for Tulsa, which has prompted police to more than double the number of firearms confiscated since 2011.

Source: Shutterstock

22. Hartford, Connecticut

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,066
Property Crimes Per 100k: 3,602

The capital city of Connecticut, Hartford is also known as the “Insurance Capital of the World” thanks to the many insurance companies headquartered there. It also holds the distinction of being one of the oldest cities in the United States and a great destination for history buffs. In spite of these distinctions, Hartford is a city currently suffering through a high crime rate and economic woes.

Hartford’s violent crime rate of 1,066 incidents per 100,000 people can be at least partly attributed to the city’s high unemployment and poverty. The unemployment rate (7.0%) and poverty rate (30.5%) are both well above the national average of 3.9% and 14.9%, respectively.

Source: Shutterstock

21. Lansing, Michigan

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,108
Property Crimes Per 100k: 3,030

The capital of Michigan (that’s right, it’s not Detroit!), Lansing is home to Michigan State University — one of the largest universities in the country — and is an important cultural, commercial, and industrial hub. Unfortunately, Lansing is held back by higher than average violent crime and poverty. The city’s main issue is aggravated assault, which accounted for nearly 74% of the 1,301 violent crimes reported in 2018.

The good news is the Department of Justice awarded Michigan more than $122 million earlier this year to help curb violent crime, so the situation stands to get better in Lansing going forward.

Source: Shutterstock

20. Nashville, Tennessee

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,113
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,011

With its unbeatable live music scene and an amazing selection of bars and restaurants, it’s no surprise Nashville is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the US. But what you won’t find on your typical list of the best things to do in Nashville are the city’s crime statistics, which are actually quite alarming.

Believe it or not, Nashville’s violent crime rate is more than triple the national average, with aggravated assaults leading the way. In fact, the city’s Metro Police reported that aggravated assaults were up 23% in 2019, which suggests things may be getting worse in Nashville.

However, this doesn’t mean you should cancel your trip to “Music City, USA”. As long as you take precautions and avoid Nashville’s most dangerous spots, there’s no reason you can’t safely take in the Grand Ole Opry.

Source: Shutterstock

19. New Orleans, Louisiana

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,163
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,557

The home of Creole cuisine and Mardi Gras, New Orleans is one of the most unique cities in the United States. But while the city has benefited greatly from redevelopment efforts in the wake of Hurricane Katrina’s mass devastation, crime continues to be a major issue in “The Big Easy”.

Homicides are especially high in New Orleans, with the city’s homicide rate (37 per 100,000 people) ranking fifth-highest among mid – to large-size American cities. Fortunately, the 141 homicides New Orleans saw in 2018 were actually the lowest total since 1971 and that downward trend has continued in 2019, so things might be looking up for Louisiana’s most populous city.

Source: Shutterstock

18. Wichita, Kansas

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,179
Property Crimes Per 100k: 5,618

Wichita is the largest city in the state of Kansas and a major aeronautical hub, earning it the nickname of “The Air Capital of the World”. While Wichita’s unemployment and poverty rates fall within national averages, the city has experienced a “precipitous increase” in violent crime over the last three years.

The situation has gotten bad enough that earlier this year, Wichita sought federal help. The city is now a participant in the U.S. Department of Justice National Safety Partnership, a national program that aims to drive down crime. The three-year program provides training and technical assistance to the Wichita Police Department at no extra cost.

Source: Shutterstock

17. Indianapolis, Indiana

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,272
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,129

Home to the Pacers and Colts, Indianapolis is also where you’ll find the world’s largest children’s museum and one of the largest privately funded zoos in the country. The city is an economic hub for the state of Indiana and boasts an unemployment rate lower than the national average. Unfortunately, Indianapolis’s violent crime rate makes it the most dangerous city in the state, with hate crimes and firearm violence, in particular, standing out as pain points.

The good news is that Indianapolis has made great strides in tackling its firearm problems in recent years. There are now several intervention programs in place, including firearm buyback events designed to get firearms off the streets.

Source: Shutterstock

16. Oakland, California

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,273
Property Crimes Per 100k: 5,390

For years, Oakland has struggled to break free of its reputation as a dangerous city. Unfortunately, statistics only help support the reality of Oakland being one of the most dangerous places to live in California. While the city’s violent crime rate did go down a bit in 2018, it still sits nearly four times the national average. The robbery rate in Oakland (610 incidents per 100,000 people) is especially concerning, trailing only Baltimore as the highest in the country.

There is reason to be optimistic about crime prevention in Oakland though. The city’s police department now uses a high tech program developed in nearby Silicon Valley called Law Enforcement Analysis Portal to help collect and analyze large amounts of crime data.

Source: Shutterstock

15. Anchorage, Alaska

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,309
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,927

Home to more than 41% of Alaska’s entire population, Anchorage is an important northern economic center that boasts spectacular views (six different mountain ranges make up its skyline). Sadly, along with being the most northern capital city in the U.S., Anchorage holds the unfortunate distinction of being the country’s sexual assault capital.

With 210 reported sexual assaults for every 100,000 people, Anchorage has the highest rate of any US city with a population of at least 100,000. The reasons for this are complex but it’s not just Anchorage suffering from violent crimes. Alaska as a whole is considered the most dangerous state for women, with 59% of women who live there having experienced violence.

Source: Shutterstock

14. Springfield, Missouri

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,316
Property Crimes Per 100k: 7,019

Home to three universities — Missouri State University, Drury University, and Evangel University — Springfield has the look and feel of your average midwestern college town. However, this unassuming city has a surprisingly high violent crime rate, nearly three times that of Missouri as a whole.

In an effort to curb violent crime, Springfield Police recently formed the “Career Criminal Task Force” alongside the FBI to target repeat offenders. “We’re going to go after the bad guys and we’re going to put them in jail. People deserve to feel safe,” Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt told KSPR.

Source: Shutterstock

13. San Bernardino, California

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,333
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,135

Home to the very first McDonald’s restaurant (now a McDonald’s Museum), San Bernardino is an inland California city that lies along the iconic Route 66. Unfortunately, the city has become better known for its struggling economy over the last 25 years. The closing of Norton Air Force Base in 1994 cost San Bernardino 10,000 jobs and the city has never truly recovered.

San Bernardino was declared America’s second poorest city behind Detroit in 2011 and while things have somewhat improved, more than 30% of residents still live below the poverty line. Areas with limited economic opportunities tend to have high crime, so it’s little surprise the violent crime rate in San Bernardino is nearly four times the national average.

Source: Shutterstock

12. Albuquerque, New Mexico

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,364
Property Crimes Per 100k: 6,179

Although it never had to deal with a drug kingpin named Heisenberg, the real-life Albuquerque, New Mexico has crime problems of its own. Incidents of sexual assault and homicide are more than double the national average, while aggravated assaults are three times as common.

The fact that Albuquerque accounts for half of all crime in New Mexico while only being home to a quarter of the state’s population prompted the city’s mayor Tim Keller to ask for state help. We’ll have to wait until the FBI releases its 2020 data to see if the situation in Albuquerque improves.

Source: Shutterstock

11. Rockford, Illinois

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,386
Property Crimes Per 100k: 3,671

Although Chicago is probably the first city that springs to mind when you think of crime in Illinois, the Windy City is actually not the most dangerous place in the state. With a violent crime rate of 1,386 incidents per 100,000 people, Rockford stands as the most dangerous city in Illinois.

Despite economic revitalization efforts creating new jobs in the automotive, aerospace, and healthcare industries over the last few decades, Rockford continues to struggle economically. Both its unemployment rate (6.8%) and poverty rate (22.2%) sit well above national averages.

Source: Shutterstock

10. Stockton, California

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,399
Property Crimes Per 100k: 3,768

With a violent crime rate of 1,399 incidents per 100,000 people, Stockton ranks as California’s most dangerous city and the 10th most dangerous in the country. Home to the oldest university in California — The University of the Pacific — Stockton has a rich history, being one of the hubs of the 19th century Gold Rush.

Unfortunately, the 2008 financial crisis hit Stockton especially hard and in 2012, it became the largest city in US history to file for bankruptcy protection (Detroit would surpass it the following year). Despite exiting bankruptcy in 2013, job opportunities in Stockton remain slim, with 6.9% of the city’s labor force unemployed in 2018.

Source: Todd A. Merport / Shutterstock.com

9. Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,413
Property Crimes Per 100k: 2,971

Milwaukee is often associated with its proud brewing tradition and cold Midwestern winters; not violent crime. Alas, with 1,413 violent crimes for every 100,000 people, the home of the Bucks is not only the most dangerous city in Wisconsin but the United States as a whole. Researchers have pointed to segregation and the opioid crisis being major factors behind Milwaukee’s violence, though a poverty rate nearly doubles the national average also hasn’t helped matters.

Much like the young Parkland survivors, Milwaukee’s youth have become heavily involved in violence prevention. 414LIFE and other organizations are currently working to establish a youth violence interruption coalition in the city’s school system.

Source: Shutterstock

8. Little Rock, Arkansas

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,446
Property Crimes Per 100k: 6,547

Don’t let the name fool you. Despite having a name one would associate with a quaint American town, Little Rock has a shockingly high crime rate. In 2018, the city saw 1,446 violent crimes for every 100,000 people, nearly quadruple the national rate.

Property crime is also a major problem in Little Rock, with non-violent crimes like burglary and larceny leading the way. The city’s property crime rate ranks third among U.S. cities with populations of 100,000 or more. It’s a shame too, as Little Rock does have some decent attractions and boasts great walks down by the Arkansas River.

Source: Shutterstock

7. Cleveland, Ohio

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,449
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,411

Crime is a serious issue in all major Ohio cities with the exception of Columbus, which does not rank on the FBI’s list of the 50 most dangerous U.S. cities. Out of all of them, Cleveland has the unfortunate distinction of being the most dangerous city in Ohio.

Despite thriving healthcare and tech sectors, Cleveland has alarming poverty and unemployment figures. 6.5% of the labor force is out of work, while a staggering 35.2% of the population live below the poverty line. These factors have helped drive a violent crime rate four times the national average.

Source: Shutterstock

6. Kansas City, Missouri

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,590
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,306

The biggest question most people have about Kansas City is, “Why isn’t it in Kansas?” But the question we really should be asking is, “Why is the city so violent?” After all, poverty isn’t a major problem in Kansas City and its unemployment rate is actually lower than the national average.

And yet, violent crime is out of control in Kansas City, with the city on course to see a record number of homicides in 2019. A 4-year wave of firearm violence has left Kansas City grasping for solutions. However, firearm violence is a problem across Missouri as a whole, meaning KC will likely have to wait for a solution to be found at the state level.

Source: Shutterstock

5. St. Louis, Missouri

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,800
Property Crimes Per 100k: 5,911

Believe it or not, Kansas City is not the most dangerous place in Missouri. That title goes to St. Louis, a major economic hub and home to ten Fortune 500 companies. Unfortunately, low unemployment has done little to curb violence in St. Louis, which saw 187 homicides in 2018.

When adjusted for population, St. Louis’s homicide rate of 61 incidents per 100,000 people make it the homicide capital of the U.S. In recent years, fed up residents have been putting pressure on Missouri lawmakers to change the state’s firearm laws. But with no solutions in sight, it may be some time before St. Louis residents see any relief.

Source: Shutterstock

4. Baltimore, Maryland

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,833
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,495

Baltimore, Maryland is a city obsessed with preservation. Nearly one-third of the city’s buildings are designated as historic, more than any other U.S. city. Unfortunately, recent history is something the city’s residents likely want to forget, as Baltimore continues to rank as one of the country’s most dangerous places.

With 309 recorded homicides in 2018, Baltimore is easily one of the most violent and dangerous major cities in America. The city’s homicide rate of 51 per 100,000 only trails St. Louis while the robbery rate of 837 incidents per 100,000 people is the highest in the country. According to the New York Times, violent crime has spiked since the infamous passing of Freddie Gray in 2015 and it’s showing no signs of getting better anytime soon.

Source: Shutterstock

3. Birmingham, Alabama

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,911
Property Crimes Per 100k: 6,313

Once known as “The Magic City”, today Birmingham is the most populous city in Alabama and one of the largest banking centers in the U.S. Yet for all its economic successes, Birmingham has an alarming crime rate that sits 112% higher than the national average. Aggravated assaults are the primary concern, as they accounted for nearly 70% of all violent crimes reported in 2018.

The homicide rate is also shockingly high. Although the 88 homicides the city saw in 2018 is much lower than other cities on this list, the homicide rate is actually third highest in the country once the population is taken into account.

Source: Shutterstock

2. Memphis, Tennessee

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,943
Property Crimes Per 100k: 6,405

With a violent crime rate of 1,943 incidents per 100,000 people, Memphis, Tennessee ranks as the most dangerous city in America’s south. One could argue that violence is just as much a part of Memphis’s identity as blues music and barbeque. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis in 1968 and since the Civil Rights Movement, the city has become ground zero for some of the worst firearm violence in the country.

In fact, the majority of the city’s 186 homicides last year were firearm-related. Recently, U.S. Attorney General William Barr unveiled a new plan to reduce firearm violence in Memphis, Project Guardian, so hopefully, Memphis will start to see some relief in the coming years.

Source: f11photo / Shutterstock.com

1. Detroit, Michigan

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 2,007
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,304

The Motor City just can’t seem to catch a break. While most major U.S. cities continue to grow, Detroit has seen one of the steepest population declines over the last half-century. At its peak, the city was home to 1.8 million people in the 1950s. But the decline in manufacturing jobs has driven the population down to less than 700,000 today. The city’s massive unemployment and poverty rates (9% and 37.9%, respectively) amount to a city with the highest violent crime rate in the country.

Today, large swaths of Detroit lie abandoned; a living reminder of the city’s decline. Unfortunately, until Detroit’s public administration gets its act together and starts attracting business and economic growth, its status as America’s most dangerous city will only continue.

Source: Shutterstock

25 Most Dangerous Cities In The US In 2019

When it comes to travel, one of the most important things to consider is safety. Most people would assume safety is something they have to worry about when traveling to other countries where they don’t speak the same language or are unfamiliar with the culture, and while that is true, there is also a risk of danger even closer to home. You might be surprised to learn there are many cities within the United States that aren’t exactly all peaches and cream. You wouldn’t want to walk around alone at night or wander aimlessly as a tourist in any of the following cities on this list because they’re considered to be the most dangerous in America.

This list was created based off information from the FBI’s crime statistics which were gathered from US cities with a population over 100,000 between January 2017 and June 2017. The data looks specifically at the amount of violent crimes in a city which includes rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. It’s important to note that the data used to create this Uniform Crime Report is collected voluntarily by police forces in cities across the country and not every city or state chooses to participate, so this list doesn’t necessarily give the full picture. However, it does give a big picture look at some of the more dangerous cities which can be helpful for people who are planning their next big city vacation in 2019.

Here’s a look at some of the most dangerous cities in the U.S. in 2019…

25. Lansing, Michigan

First up on this list is the capital of Michigan, Lansing. Business Insider reported that this city experienced 52.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents which converts to about 14 homicides in the year 2017. Unfortunately, unlike most cities where crime rates are going down, this was the highest it had been in the previous five years.

In 2017 the poverty rate was 29.5-percent and the unemployment rate sat at about 6.3-percent. Police Chief Mike Yankowski told the Lansing State Journal that their high crime rates were due to domestic violence and mental illness.

24. Minneapolis, Minnesota

Minneapolis is best known for being a very diverse and artsy city, but now it’s also known as one of the most dangerous cities in the U.S. When considering a trip to this city in 2019, just remember that it didn’t fare so well in 2017. Only two years ago the violent crime rates were pretty high in Minneapolis with a rate of about 53.7 per 10,000 residents, according to Business Insider.

USA Today translates this violent crime rate to 1,101 per 100,000 residents with a grand total of 42 homicides in 2017. The poverty rate was 21.3-percent and the unemployment rate was 3.1-percent.

23. New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans is actually a pretty popular tourist hotspot, mainly because if its vibrant music scene, rich history, and round the clock party atmosphere. However what many people don’t often talk about is the fact that it’s actually quite dangerous, statistically. Business Insider writes that this city had 56.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents in 2017 and 24/7 Wall St. notes that the city has some of the highest murder rates.

USA Today writes that in 2017 this touristy city had a violent crime rate of 1,121 per 100,000 residents and 157 homicides. The poverty rate here was 26.2-percent with an unemployment rate of 5.1-percent. Luckily mayor LaToya Cantrell has vowed to do something about it with a new program called Cure Violence.

Photo by: Bill Staney via Flickr

22. Newark, New Jersey

You’d think we’d see New York City on here ahead of one in New Jersey, but surprisingly, Newark is more prone to violence than the big apple (at least when population is factored in). In fact New York City is actually one of the safest big cities in the country. Not too far away is the city of Newark, New Jersey, one of the most dangerous cities in America. Business Insider writes that Newark had 42.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents in 2017.

In 2016 there were 36 murders per 100,000 Newark residents which was about three times higher than any other city in New Jersey and the fifth highest in the country, at the time. One of the biggest factors in this city is unemployment. Cities with high unemployment rates tend to have more crime and Newark had an unemployment rate of about 8-percent which is about 5-percent higher than the national average. The poverty rate in 2016 was 29.7-percent which is also 15.5-percent higher than the national average. Not surprisingly, most of the crime takes place in the cities poorest areas, writes 24/7 Wall St. A report by the Safer Newark Council found that most of the violent crime occurred in only about 20-percent of the city streets, primarily in the West and South Wards. The report also said most of the homicide in the city is drug and gang related.

21. San Bernardino, California

In addition to being known as the site for the world’s first McDonald’s and the largest outdoor amphitheater in the United States, San Bernardino also has a reputation for being one of the most dangerous cities in the country (according to 2017 statistics) and the largest city to file for protection under Chapter 9 of the U.S. Bankruptcy code. This bankruptcy plays a huge role in the crime rate of this city because there have been major cutbacks to the police force.

In 2017 there were 1,291 violent crimes reported which includes murder, rapes, robberies, and aggravated assaults. This is the 15th highest in the entire country. USA Today reports that in 2017 San Bernardino had a violent crime rate of 1,291 per 100,000 residents, there were 34 homicides, and the city experienced a poverty rate of 32.3-percent with an unemployment rate of 6.3-percent.

20. Indianapolis, Indiana

When planning a trip in 2019, keep in mind that Indianapolis had a violent crime rate of 1,334 per 100,000 residents in 2017 which was one of the worst years this city has ever seen. As Indiana’s capital city, Indianapolis, sometimes referred to as ‘Indy’ is densely populated with an estimated population of about 863,002. On Dec. 28, 2017 Fox 59 reported there were 156 homicides in this city. This goes alongside a poverty rate of 20.9-percent and an unemployment rate of 3.6-percent. According to the FBI Uniform Crime Report, the violent crime rate in Indianapolis in 2017 was about 1,334 crimes per 100,000 residents.

19. Stockton, California

California is an extremely popular vacation spot, but it’s also an extremely big state with lots of cities, some nicer than others. We’re sure Stockton would be a lovely place to visit in 2019, but we think tourists should be wary about the unusually high crime rate here, especially in 2019 considering it wasn’t that long ago that the country claimed bankruptcy and landed on many lists as one of the U.S. cities with the highest crime rates. According to 2017 reports, this city had 68.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

The city claimed bankruptcy back in 2012 making it one of the most populous cities to do so. The lack of funding could possibly affecting their ability to fight crime by limiting the amount of resources available. The violent crime rate in 2017 was 1,415 per 100,000 residents with a total of 55 homicides. The unemployment rate was 8-percent, which is among the highest in the country, and the poverty rate was 23.7-percent.

18. Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Milwaukee is the largest city in Wisconsin. It’s a beautiful city that has a stunning waterfront along Lake Michigan. To a lot of tourists, this city is known for its cultural events and festivals and for those who live here, it’s a great city that has tons of stuff to do and a booming economy with several universities and Fortune 500 companies, but there is one major thing to be wary about when traveling to this city. It’s has high crime rates. In fact, according to crime reports presented by the FBI for the year 2017,  Milwaukee had a violent crime rate of 1,597 per 100,000. This ranks as the seventh highest in the entire country and means that for every 10,000 residents in Milwaukee there were 75.6 violent crimes in 2017.

USA Today takes a deeper look and reports that there were 118 homicides in this city in 2017, along with a poverty rate of 28.4-percent and an unemployment rate of 4.6-percent. Luckily, the amount of homicides is actually going down. In 2016 it was 141 which is slightly higher than 2017. It seems the Milwaukee Police Department are working hard to lower these numbers by focusing their attention on a two-mile section, where most of these crimes occur.

17. Kansas City, Missouri

We’re not in Kansas anymore Toto! Okay, so it’s not the same Kansas as Wizard of Oz, but close enough. Turns out the state of Missouri is much more dangerous than the state of Kansas, specifically Kansas City (and St. Louis, but more on that later on). You might be wondering what this city is doing on this list considering it was just praised for doing such a good job bringing their homicide rate down. Unfortunately, it was short lived and it’s once again on the rise again. Be wary of this when planning a trip in 2019.

USA Today crunched the numbers from 2017 and found that Kansas City had a violent crime rate of 1,724 per 100,000 residents. There were 150 homicides which is up from the 129 in 2016. In addition to that, the unemployment rate was 4.3-percent and the poverty rate sat at about 18.3-percent.

Sharon Day / Shutterstock.com

16. Rockford, Illinois

You might not have ever heard of Rockford Illinois, but it’s actually the third largest city in Illinois and surprisingly, one of the most violent. While it’s not nearly as bad as Chicago and the number of homicides was actually quite low in 2017. There were only 18 murders reported that year. Rockford is still no walk in the park in terms of safety because homicide is not their biggest problem. According to data collected from 2017, Rockford had 78 violent crimes per 10,000 residents. There were 1,773 aggravated assault cases reported in 2017 which is a lot more than many other cities with the same population. For example, Naperville, Illinois has an even bigger population than Rockford and it’s reported cases of aggravated assault were only 80.

USA Today reports there was a violent crime rate of 1,588 per 100,000 residents and lists an unemployment rate of 7.5-percent and a poverty rate of 22.7-percent. Luckily, this city isn’t exactly a hot tourist spot, especially considering it’s in the same state of Chicago which is one of the most visited cities in the country, so Rockford often gets overlooked.

15. Birmingham, Alabama

Located in the South, Birmingham is the most populous city in Alabama and is often associated as being part of the “deep south.” Sadly, in addition to its southern roots, this city lands in the top 5 on Business Insider’s list of the most violent cities in the U.S., as well as Forbes top 5. Business Insider writes that Birmingham, Alabama had 86.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents in 2017 and Forbes writes that there were 1,483 violent crimes per 100,000 residents.

If we wanted to look on the bright side of all this, Birmingham is actually making progress despite the fact that it’s still quite dangerous. The crime here is down 40-percent from what it was in the mid-1990s. Forbes writes that according to the U.S. Census Department, much of the crime in this city is due to the high drug trade and the high poverty rate. The poverty rate in Birmingham is 26-percent. This is quite a lot considering the state average is 17-percent.

14. Nashville, Tennessee

There’s no denying that Nashville is having a bit of a moment in terms of tourism. In the past few years this city has been crawling with tourists between the months of May and September. What most people probably don’t realize is that this city is actually statistically one of the more dangerous cities in the country.

In the year 2017 there were 110 homicides in the Nashville metropolitan area. Also, the crime rate was 1,138 per 100,000 residents and the poverty rate sat at about 18-percent. The murder rate in this city is so bad that the Oasis Center of Nashville which works to help at risk youth in the area called it an epidemic, according to 24/7 Wall St. Outsiders traveling in probably didn’t hear about the high homicide rate in this city because Metro Police spokeswoman Kristin Mumford told Nashville News4 that most of these homicides were between people who knew each other and were engaged in “risky behavior.”

13. Cleveland, Ohio

For the past several years, Cleveland has been considered one of the most dangerous cities in the U.S. based on national crime rankings. Cleveland is the second largest city in Ohio which means it also has a large population. Unfortunately, a good chunk of this population lives in poverty and is unemployed. The city has some of the highest rates of unemployment in the country. In 2017 the unemployment rate sat at 7.4-percent and the poverty rate was 36-percent.

Not surprisingly, these numbers contribute to the higher violent crime rates. In 2017, Cleveland experienced 107 homicides and nearly 6,000 violent crimes were reported. The violent crime rate was calculated to be 69.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents or 1,557 per 100,000 residents. While it’s still considered to be a great city to visit (I mean, it is the home of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame), but travellers should just be wary of the high crime rate in this city when traveling here in 2019, and practice common sense.

12. Detroit, Michigan

It might not be too surprising to see this city on the list. Detroit has a reputation for being a bit of an urban graveyard with thousands of empty buildings, a massive population decline, and a high poverty rate. In 2017 the city’s poverty rate sat at a whopping 39-percent with an unemployment rate of 9.3-percent. Not surprisingly, these traits all contribute to a high crime rate.

A closer look at Detroit’s violent crime rate in 2017 showed that there were 2,057 per 100,000 residents and 267 homicides.

11. Chicago, Illinois

Chicago has a notorious reputation when it comes to crime, but it’s actually not as bad as some smaller cities on this list like New Orleans, Newark, and Detroit. Chicago is the third largest city in the country and while it does have a higher murder rate than the two larger cities, Los Angeles and New York City, it’s still not the most dangerous city in the country. The latest data from 2017 shows that the murder rate in Chicago was 24 per 100,000 residents. That same year 650 people were murdered in this city, down from 771 in 2016, which isn’t hard considering it was the deadliest year the city had seen in decades.

Despite the higher risk of danger in this city, it doesn’t seem to deter tourists at all. In 2017 it was the second most visited city in the United States with 55 million visitors, right behind New York City which had 65 million visitors.

10. Anchorage, Alaska

Tourism is actually a big part of Alaska’s economy, so it does get a lot of visitors throughout the year, but it also has a pretty high crime rate. This is mainly due to the fact that it is such a large state. It is the largest state, the 3rd least populous and the most sparsely populated state in America. This probably plays a big role in why Alaska has higher crime rates because the police are unable to get to a crime scene as quickly as they would in a more densely populated city. This also affects their ability to solve a lot of crimes. In 2017, Anchorage had 57.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

Road Snacks writes that Anchorage ranked as the 16th most dangerous city in terms of violent crimes in 2017 with 1,203 per 100,000 residents and the 25th most dangerous for property crimes with a rate of 5,415 per 100,000 residents. 24/7 Wall St. writes that many experts blame drug and gang violence for these high crime rates and that more drug addiction and mental health treatment centers are needed in the city.

9. Baltimore, Maryland

Baltimore is no joke when it comes to violent crime. In fact, there’s a reason HBO chose Baltimore, Maryland as the set for the American crime drama series The Wire. This show was supposed to depict a fictionalized version of the real crime issues in this city. So what are the real crime issues in Baltimore? Well for starters, this city has the third highest rate of violent crimes per 100,000 people. In 2017 there were 8,879 robberies reported which means the rate per 100,000 is 959 or 2,027 to 100,000 residents. To give a little perspective, this is nearly 10 times higher than the national robbery rate and the highest in any other major U.S. city. There were also 342 homicides in 2017 and a poverty rate of 23.1-percent. On a smaller scale, Business Insider found that Baltimore had 98.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents in 2017.

USA Today reiterates this with a look at the violent crime rate per 100,000 residents which is 2,027. It also lists 2017 as having 342 homicides – that is pretty darn close to one every single day. This city also held a poverty rate of 23.1-percent and an unemployment rate of 6.1-percent.

Jon Bilous / Shutterstock.com

8. Pueblo, Colorado

When we think of Colorado we usually think of Rocky Mountains and a ski vacation getaway, but that’s not what Pueblo is known for. This city saw 48.9 violent crimes per 10,000 residents in 2017. What’s impressive is that this city is actually the smallest city on this list, but yet it still ranks pretty high up. It only just clocks over 100,000 people. While it may be smaller than some of the other cities on this list, it ranks in the eight spot for worst property crime rate with the majority of them being burglaries. Road Snacks reports there being 1,052 violent crimes per 100,000 people and 6,167 property crimes per 100,000 people.

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7. Chattanooga, Tennessee

Tennessee is a popular tourist destination because of Nashville, also known as ‘Music City,’ which also landed on this list. In addition to Nashville, the lesser known city of Chattanooga is another dangerous city to visit. It has the same kind of feel as Memphis and Nashville, but just not as touristy, and for good reason. It is one of the worst cities in America for property crime. It lands in the number 10 spot for property crime with 5,985 per 100,000 residents and is the 23rd most dangerous for violent crimes with 1,065 per 100,000 residents.

In 2017, there were 31 homicides. In most American cities the number of crime goes down each year, but for Chattanooga, the number of homicides in 2017 was at a record high. Local police said the major thing that did go down in 2017 was gang violence, writes 24/7 Wall St. In 2016 there were 132 shooting incidents, most of which were a result of a bloody gang war. While gang violence in this city is on the decline, the violent crime rate is on the rise. It was 1,023 per 100,000 in 2016, and in 2017 it rose to 1,066 per 100,000.

6. Oakland, California

Despite the high crime rates in this city, it’s actually become a desirable place to live and that’s because it’s so much cheaper than San Fransisco. Even though Oakland’s property prices are cheaper, there may be a price for safety. San Francisco ranks over 30 spots higher on the list of safe cities over Oakland. Now it’s not all doom and gloom for this city. To be fair their crime rates have actually been improving the past few years. It wasn’t that long ago that Oakland was known for having high rates of homicides, rapes, and aggravated assaults. According to 24.7 Wall St., the crime in this area skyrocketed after the recession, then went down, only to go back up again in 2012. Luckily it’s now on the decline again, but it’s still higher than most would like.

According to Road Snacks, “Oakland has the 10th highest violent crime rank in the country and the fifteenth highest property crime rate.” Yikes! In 2017 the violent crime rate was 1,299 per 100,000 residents and 69 homicides. The city had an unemployment rate of 4.2-percent and a poverty rate of 20-percent.

5. Albuquerque, New Mexico

For those who are surprised to see Albuquerque on this list, it’s more due to property crimes than violent crimes, but don’t be fooled by that. This is still one of the most dangerous cities in America. In 2016, Albuquerque had one of the worst crime rates in the country with 1,112 reported incidents of rape, assault, homicide, and robbery per 100,000 residents. Unfortuantely, 2017 didn’t fair much better for this city. In fact, the rates rose by a whopping 23-percent. In 2017 it became the 11th most dangerous city in America with 1,369 violent crimes per 100,000 residents, 70 of these incidents were homicides.

The poverty rate in Albuquerque is 18.9-percent with an unemployment rate of 5.5-percent. What’s even worse than being ranked as the 11th most violent city in the country? It’s ranked as the third most dangerous city for property crimes with 7, 365 per 100,000 residents in 2017. Many of these property crimes are a result of robberies. In 2016 the city reported 2,000 robberies which then rose to 2,930 in 2017.

 

4. Springfield, Missouri

As the first Springfield in America, this city made history. It’s making history once again, but this time as one of the most dangerous cities in the U.S. Business Insider looked at FBI data from 2017 and found that Springfield had 40.3 violent crimes per 10,000 residents. According to 24/7 Wall St., this number is on the rise. The homicide rate nearly doubled between 2016 and 2017 going from 4.8 to 8.3 per 100,000. The same source writes, “Murder and non-negligent manslaughter represent a relatively small share of overall violent crime, and Springfield’s violent crime rate remained effectively unchanged between 2016 and 2017.”

Road Snacks lists it as the number one most dangerous city in terms of property crimes with 8,853 per 100,000 people and the 12th most dangerous for violent crimes with 1,338 per 100,000 residents. There were 14 homicides in 2017, a poverty rate of 25.9-percent and an unemployment rate of 3.2-percent. Yet another reason to be wary of traveling to this city in 2019, this city sadly has the highest rate of reported incidents of rape in the country with an average of 209 per 100,000 residents. To give some perspective on this, the national average is 42 per 100,000.

3. Little Rock, Arkansas

Little Rock’s crime rate ain’t so little! This city is the capital of Arkansas and the largest city in the state. Not only did it have the highest crime rate in the state, but is also one of the highest in the country! Little Rock had 87.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents, says Business Insider and according to Road Snacks, it ranks in the top 10 in the country for both property and violent crimes per capita. The same source lists it as the sixth most dangerous in terms of violent crimes with 1,633 per 100,000 people and the fifth most dangerous in terms of property crimes with 6,932 per 100,000 people.

There were 55 homicides in this city in 2017, a poverty rate of 18.5-percent, and an employment rate of 3.3-percent, according to USA Today. The rate of criminal offenses in 2017 rose 1.1-percent from 2016, and 24/7 Wall St. says the police blame it on rival gang activity.

2. Memphis, Tennessee

Violence and crime probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when thinking about Memphis, Tennessee. It’s more commonly known for it’s blues on Beale Street, being the home of Elvis, and of course, the site of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. But according to crime data from 2017, it’s currently one of the most dangerous cities in America with one of the highest violent crime rates in the country. In fact, Road Snacks lists it as being the third highest in America.

According to 24/7 Wall St., there were 653,000 violent crimes and 181 homicides committed in this city in 2017 which gives residents about a one in 50 chance at being a victim. We’re guessing the high rate of poverty has something to do with these statistics because Memphis has a poverty rate of about 27.6-percent which is much higher than the national 15.1-percent.

 

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1. St. Louis, Missouri

St. Louis is typically known for it’s range of barbecue restaurants and blues music, but it’s also got another trick up it’s sleeve…one that probably isn’t advertised as much to tourists. It lands in the number one spot on several different lists as being the most dangerous city in America. Since this city ranks as the most dangerous city in America, at least based on crime data from 2017, we also consider it to be the most dangerous U.S. city to travel to in 2019.

Business Insider writes that St. Louis, Missouri had 91.5 violent crimes per 10,000 people in 2017. There were 205 homicides reported in St. Louis that same year which isn’t actually the highest number for a U.S. city in 2017, but once it’s adjusted to it’s population, it ends up being the highest murder rate in the country. According to 24/7 Wall St., St. Louis has a murder rate of 67 per 100,000 people which is extremely high, especially when it’s compared to the national average of 5 per 100,000. On top of all the violent crimes, the murder count for St. Louis in 2017 was 6,461 or 2,082 per 100,000 residents. This is the highest violent crime rate of any major U.S. city.

Wondering what has changed in 2020? Check out our updated list of the most dangerous cities in the US for 2020.

The Most Underrated American Architectural Gems

The list of America’s Favourite Works of Architecture is dominated by three cities I the northeast and one 9n the Midwest. New York has 32 places on the list (SPOILER ALERT) including #1 the Empire State Building. Chicago has 17 one more than Washington D.C. The list is especially top heavy with NYC and DC with only 5 of the top 23 outside their city limits. But a closer inspection of the rest of the list reveals a number of unjustly relegated gems masterpieces who deserve to be celebrated, along with the men who built them. And yes they are all men but that’s another issue. But get introduced to some of the giants of the 20th center. Eero Saarinen. Richard Meier whose work looks like he graduated from the Starfleet Academy in Star Date 2214.9. Fay Jones who described his work as “Ozark Gothic.” Also, meet three sports venues. One each for hockey, baseball and football. Basketball didn’t make the cut. Many of them reflect the Iron Law of Retail: Three things matter. Location. Location. Location. You might think that if a great building were in Manhattan as opposed to say, Eureka Springs, Arkansas it might have been nearer the top. In any case here are 20 reasons why the non-Northeast hinterland is well stocked with iconic architecture.

20. Ingalls Ice Arena, Yale University – New Haven, CT #149

Barely made the cut but really, how many chances are there to put a hockey rink on a list of memorable works of architecture? Answer: one. At its unveiling in 1958 it was disparagingly nicknamed The Yale Whale for tis double curve and tail. It was designed by the Finnish-American and Yale alumnus Eero Saarinen one of the greatest architects of the 20th century. The structure is unique and for its time innovative. A concrete arch supported by a cable net and later cable ties made for a marvel of engineering. Canadian hockey fans may be reminded of the Calgary Saddledome decades later. Interesting that he Top 150 list contains a number of baseball stadiums and a football stadium but no basketball venues or other historic venues such as Madison Square or Boston Garden.

19. Brown Palace Hotel – Denver 148

When the famously triangle-shaped Brown Palace opened its doors in 1892, the term Wild West was still appropriate. The iconic hotel was the height of sophistication with rare luxuries like a bathroom in every room. One Denver website says the historic and gorgeous lobby ” with its turn-of-the-century luxury finishes and the dazzling stained glass roof” qualifies as a Historic Landmark on its own. The architect F.E. Edbroke used Arizona sandstone and local Colorado red granite crafted in the Italian Renaissance style. Never mind it has hosted royalty, every U.S. President but wo and he Beatles, it was here the God known as legendary Bronco quarterback John Elway had lunch before signing the hometown Broncos. Now THAT is true immortality.

18. Corning Museum of Glass – Corning, NY #136

The Corning company campus in upstate New York is a magical enclave of glass buildings designed and built by notable architects over three generations. What began as a single low building with walls made of (what else?) glass, its fabulous collection grew and necessitated extensions which are works of art on their own in 1980, 2002 and the latest in 2015. It is a stark white box which on closer inspection reveals an intricate layering of glass sheets, with white and grey silicon. The renowned collection of artifacts dating back 3,500 years, the website says the entire history of art through a single material.”

17. Safeco Field – Seattle 135

Though 15 years old “The Safe’ is still a state of the art facility. It presents itself with a curved brick facade retro homage to the great ballparks of old, like Ebbetts Field and Yankee Stadium. Some regard the juxtaposition with the ultra-modern facets of the rest an ungainly hybrid. The unique 22 million pound retractable roof protects field and fans from inclement weather. An underground heating system induces the 7 grass blend of Kentucky blue and perennial rye to turn green by opening day. It affords grand views of the Seattle skyline and Puget Sound. More importantly, the sightlines for fans are among the highest-rated in the league and player testimonials are glowing. Maybe the more the Mariners on field product is a winning one the better everyone feels about the park.

16. Douglas House – Harbor Springs, MI Richard Meier #130

If you haven’t met before, welcome to the wild, white world of Richard Meier one of architecture’s towering geniuses. Architecture aficionados will note the influences of Le Corbusier and Miles van de Rohe in the building and the furniture which Meier also designed. It is an extremely ambitious structure, packing a lot into its small residential size. The material is reinforced concrete. The front faces a the rock wall of the shore while the four-story back faces Lake Michigan and provides floor to ceiling views with stairways tucked away in corners. With a skylight on top and unimpeded views of the lake make it an exercise in sublime space, a futuristic enclosure springing from primordial lakeside bedrock.

15. Union Station Kansas City #127

The beautiful BeauxArts station was the second largest in the U.S when it opened in the fall of 1914. It was huge, 850,000 square feet and 95 feet up to is gloriously ornate ceiling with a trio of chandeliers each weighing 3500 pounds. But it withered as traffic dried up, dropping from almost 700,000 in 1945 to just 33.000 in 1973. By the 90’s, the website says, “was a broken and empty shell begging for attention.” When government decided to save it, the assembled an all- star team for what was more of a resurrection than restoration. Much of the roof had to be replaced with tiles of the exact same shape and color. The grand chandeliers were rewired, the original paint color was reproduced. The tram included experts who had work on restoration projects on Windsor Castle, Grand Central Station, and the Lincoln Memorial. Now the Station is alive and thriving with shops, restaurants and a Science Center, an architectural Lazarus brought back from the dead.

14. The Athenaeum – New Harmony, IN

Another striking exercise in white by Richard Meier New Harmony began life in 1814 as utopian community founded by a group of dissenting Germans who formed the New Harmonie Society before selling to a wealthy industrialist who made it a model community for education and social justice. As it came to be called the Athens of the West, Meier’s gateway porcelain-paneled building was called The Athenaeum… The AIA nomination called it building “one of Meier’s seminal works of architecture … a classic Meier design.” Visitors are taken up through 3 floors of exhibits to a fourth floor panorama of the Indiana flatlands and Wabash River before being led down exterior ramps to town, as if transitioning from our deeply-flawed world mankind has made to the utopian dream ha might have been.

13. Humana Building – Louisville, KY Michael Graves, #98

The 26- story post-modern skyscraper opened in 1985 and has won multiple awards for architect Michael Graves, one of the greatest interpreters of the style. TIME Magazine listed it as one of the 10 best buildings of the 1980’s. Most of the exterior its pink granite and gold leaf. It is a building with many faces and styles, each side being different. Its eight-floor Main Street façade mirrors the low-rise historical buildings alongside.
Above it explodes into energetic collisions of loggia and colonnades. The interior office space with tis modern statues and marble finishes is immaculate and looks more like the residence of a billionaire with impeccable taste than a place where people actually work. Graves did have his playful side. Humana was once dubbed The Milk Carton for its unusual shape(s). He also designed a postmodern teakettle for Target.

12. United States Courthouse, Islip NY #97

Yes another example of the Whiter Shade of Richard Meier. Islip is an historic town on the south coast off Long Island that opened in 2000. For a change, here is the building in his own words. “This federal courthouse takes advantage of panoramic views over both the Great South Bay and the Atlantic Ocean. The 12-story building is placed on a podium to gain an extra presence on an otherwise flat and undifferentiated suburban site. Visitors ascend two wide tiers of steps and enter the building through a monumental 9-story, top-lit rotunda in the form of an opaque cone clad in white metal panels. The rest of the south elevation consists of a gently inflected curtain wall that allows light into the corridors and permits uninterrupted views of the ocean. The north façade is faced with metal panels and pierced by horizontal windows. This building reinterprets the courthouse as a new type of civic institution, receptive to public events as well as to the formalities of the judicial process. The terraced forecourt, articulated by a modulated surface and rectilinear plantings of trees, provides an appropriate setting for a building of such civic stature.

11. Dolphin and Swan Hotels, Walt Disney World Orlando #70

Before you roll your eyes at the inclusion of Disney hotels as some kind of déclassé architectural comfort food like Kraft dinner, rest assure this is a serious, if whimsical piece of architecture by Michel Graves, the same man who revolutionized the skyscraper with he Urbana building in Louisville. He began by creating a whole new mythical story with no existing Disney characters. Once upon a time, a submerged island was suddenly propelled to the surface with the dolphins on top and two birds who went in for closer inspection were transformed into swans, in this case, 28 ton 47 feet high swans. The dolphins were inspired by the master Italian sculptor Gian Lorenzo Bernini whose work will be known to anyone who has had the good fortune to stroll the Piazza Navona in Rome. The dolphin subplot is ha Bernini’s frowned and Disney ownership insisted they put on a happy face. And there was no skimping on materials. European-made chandeliers with accents of Asian Golden Onyx and tropical Pao rosewood. As Mickey would say, “Oh boy, that sure is swell.”

10. Salt Lake City Public Library #69

Born in Israel, educated in Canada and based in Boston, architect Moshe Safdie burst onto the international scene before the age of 30 with his stunning design of the model housing complex, Habitat, a centerpiece of the 1967 World Exposition in Montreal. The dazzling library is a good deal more transparent that allows for lovely natural light and views of the Wasatch mountains. A virtuoso performance in glass and geometry has one building a triangle, another wing a rectangle enclosed with a crescent. At the base is a garden in a piazza and on top is a roof garden. Fireplaces swirling four floors up resemble a wall of flame at night from some angles. The windows though extensive have a very high UV rating for energy efficiency and are the sunblock for the library’s book collection.

9. Nebraska State Capital – Lincoln, NE #67

The Nebraska State Capitol building is ground breaking in more than one way. It was the first to be built as a tower. Perhaps more importantly I was far ahead of is time incorporating and paying tribute to the indigenous cultures of the plaints Indians. In parts Gothic and Byzantine Revival in style, the 400t foot tower is crowned by a massive figure The Sower” the people who came to plant and grow the crops and the very state itself. Inscriptions dot the exterior drawing on quotes from Aristotle, Plato and Navajo school wisdom.The doors to the East Chamber are especially striking and memorable together weighing the better part of a ton, eloquently commemorating the culture of the Plains Indians that the Americans and Europeans displaced…

8. Thorncrown Chapel – Eureka Springs 60

If any place can be said to be The Middle of Nowhere, Eureka Springs might be it. Two hundredf miles north of Little Rock, 250 east of Oklahoma City and 300 southeast of St. Louis It is also a renowned as a centre for the Arts with a School of the Arts, Writers’ Colony, dance studio Opera and Shakespeare in the Ozarks. A fitting home to one of the greatest architectural creations of the 20th century, the chapel which award- winning designer and Frank Lloyd Wright disciple Fay Jones jokingly labelled “Ozark Gothic. Its inspiration was the truly fabulous real Gothic 13th century Ste Chappelle in Paris. Thorncrown does not have Ste Chappelle’s incomparable stained glass but instead uses a starkly beautiful design, 425 windows and the light of the Ozark countryside as its ‘organic’ stained glass, changing hue and colour .As its website describes, and “Its appearance changes during each hour of the day and during the different seasons of the year.” A classic example of organic architecture, it appears to be ‘of’ the place not ‘on’ it.

7. Milwaukee Art Museum – Milwaukee # 59

Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava was asked to undertake the daunting task to design and build an addition to the Museum’s striking original bui8lding dopne by the great Eero Saarinen who you’ve already met here. He succeeded in a spectacular post-modern manner. The Quaddraci pavilion (named after its primary donors) is huge. Just the Gothic Cathedral-style entrance hall can hold a two-story house. It is a unique combination of technology and craftsmanship. There are many nautical visual references. A ship’s prow, a remarkable set of steel fins, called the Burke Brise Soleil (literally) “sun break” up to a 105 feet in length and weighing 90 tons which Calatrava called the crowning element. Engineered to close automatically whenever wind speed exceeds 23 mph for more than three seconds, they also deploy and close each morning, noon and evening, thereby achieving his desire to reflect “he culture of the lake: the sailboats, the weather, the sense of motion and change.”

6. Denver International Airport – Denver #57

At first the DIA was infamous for its ambitious computerized baggage system that ate whatever it didn’t lose outright. It took 10 years for airlines to abandon it for good. Now, it’s famous for the peaked roof of the Jeppesen terminal that is reminiscent of the iconic Sydney Opera House, but in fact is a now world-famous rendition of the snow-capped Rockies that also evokes the pioneers’ wagons and Indian tepees. It is white but also green. Its translucence allows for generous amounts of natural light while its coating reflects 90% of the heat. The cable systems draws on that of the Brooklyn Bridge more than a century earlier. Also famous is a pedestrian that offers views of the Rockies above and taxiing planes below. With the addition of a solar energy farm, DIA has become a world leader in airport sustainability management. Architect Curtis Fentress , a disciple of the great Chinese American architect I.M. Pei, has gone on to build award-winning airports around the world.

5. Cincinnati Paul Brown Stadium – Cincinnati #45

The Cincinnati may not deliver a world-class product on the field, but the stadium they play in does. The intensely deconstructed design is a standout on the city skyline, especially at night when the lighting system and canopy of Teflon-coated fibreglass make it glow like an alien ladybug. Aside from excellent sightlines foe game action, fans can take advantage of the totally asymmetrical open-ended structure to gaze at the city skyline and riverfront during lulls in the action. From some side angles, the design can seem to recall Marcel Duchamp’s Modernist 1912 classic Nude Descending a Staircase, No. 2, though any resemblance may simply be in the eye of some beholders pushing the beer limit. 

4. Old Faithful Inn – Yellowstone National Park #36

Not a post-modern shred to be seen here. The national historic stone and log landmark dates from 1905 and is the most popular in the park. It is also the biggest log structure in the world. But it’s not famous for size or scale but for its rustic sensibilities like the huge stone fireplace in the lobby, (though it is some lobby at 76 feet in height) and of course for its proximity to Old Faithful. The original part of the Inn, referred to as the “Old House,” is a splendid example of well-preserved so called National Park architecture and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

3. Allegheny County Courthouse – Pittsburgh #35

So compelling was Boston architect HH Richardson’s interpretation of the Romanesque Revival style, it was named after him. While the Allegheny County Courthouse may sound prosaic, Richardson considered it his finest work and one that deeply influenced future superstars like Frank Lloyd Wright and his onetime boss Louis Sullivan. The roughened surface of the granite blocks under a weight and bearing that give it an appearance of the immovable object of physics fame. The courthouse is connected in midair to a prison by “The Bridge of Sighs”, the term given by Byron to a similar link in Venice where prisoners would sigh with regret as the last sight the canals of the Great City. Though Grant Street in Pittsburgh is not be confused with the Grand Canal, it’s a lovely classical reference.

2. Wanamaker’s Department Store – Philadelphia #32

Still a Philly landmark, the dedication of the huge department store was delivered by President Taft. John Wanamaker had opened his clothing store 60 years earlier. The structure at 13th and Market streets was one of the first true department store in the country.one of the first in the country.
The exterior has been variously described as Renaissance palace and Florentine is quite plain in limestone and granite. But inside, the space was spectacular, the central court soaring five stories with eccentric features like the giant Wanamaker organ. It is the most impressive interior space in any commercial building in the city and contains the Wanamaker Organ from the St Louis World fair which joined forces with another St Louis souvenir in the beautifully-marbled Grand Court, the large Bronze Eagle. If today Philadelphians might say “Meet me at the Rocky Statue”, back then Wanamaker shoppers (which were just about everyone) would say “Meet me at the Eagle” and the rendezvous was set.

1. Bellagio #22

Anyone who has actually been to the town of Bellagio in Italy’s Lake District, may struggle to see the resemblance. Bellagio is a collection of Renaissance architecture plunked on the shores of a lake whose setting resembles a piece of pristine Pacific Northwest forest, a setting not even Steve Wynn’s considerable wallet can reproduce in Las Vegas. It does have an impressive scale. The original tower is over 500 feet tall with a staggering 3000 rooms. Standing in for Lake Como an eight-acre body of water leading out to The Strip which features the Dancing Water Fountain that rises and falls to music. There is elegance to be had within too, especially the beauty of the blown glass instillation Fiori di Como (Flowers of Como). At #22, Bellagio is sandwiched by some high-powered American icons, the Brooklyn Bridge at #20 and St. John the Divine cathedral at 23.

10 Amazing Historic Hotels in the Midwest

With a long history as an industrial manufacturing hub, the U.S. Midwest also is home to some of the nation’s finest hotels. But just as the fortunes of the region’s business barons have risen and fallen over the decades, so have many of its longest-standing hotels. Some of the Midwest’s most revered, historic hotels narrowly escaped fires, the Great Depression, and the wrecking ball, but today, they are better than ever thanks to a new generation of forward-thinking preservationists. Here are 10 amazing historic hotels in the Midwest that are still open for business, and the stories behind them.

10. Palmer House Hilton (Chicago, IL)

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The iconic Palmer House Hilton in downtown Chicago got off to a most inauspicious start when the elegant hotel fell victim to the Great Chicago Fire of 1871 only 13 days after its grand opening. But, business magnate and owner Potter Palmer quickly rebuilt the 1,641-room hotel which opened in late 1873 and has been a landmark ever since. Palmer’s wife Bertha decorated the hotel with opulent chandeliers, paintings, and other art inspired by her French heritage including a majestic ceiling fresco by painter Louis Pierre Rigal. The decadent hotel has hosted everyone from Charles Dickens and Oscar Wilde to U.S. presidents, and top entertainers such as Liberace, Frank Sinatra, Louis Armstrong, and Ella Fitzgerald performed in its Golden Empire Room. A $170 million renovation has ensured the Palmer House’s place among the top hotels to be found anywhere. Afternoon tea in the lobby is not to be missed.

9. Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza (Cincinnati, OH)

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Some hotels stand the test of time as a stunning architectural design achievement, like the Hilton Cincinnati Netherland Plaza, an Art Deco masterpiece that’s a registered National Historic Landmark. Elaborately decorated with rare Brazilian rosewood paneling, two-story ceiling murals, and original German silver-nickel sconces, the circa 1931 hotel in downtown Cincinnati is one of the world’s finest examples of French Art Deco style. Its Orchids at Palm Court is among the most beautiful restaurants in America, made even more memorable by Chef Todd Kelly, named the America Culinary Federation’s Chef of the Year (2011-12). The opulent Hall of Mirrors ballroom has been at the heart of Cincinnati’s business and social scene for over 80 with its two-story ceilings, mezzanine, and original light fixtures. The Netherland Plaza is connected to the 49-story Carew Tower which opened in 1931 and has an observation deck with sweeping views of the Ohio River Valley.

8. French Lick Resort (French Lick, IN)

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The mineral spring waters that abound in French Lick were once thought to be the elusive Fountain of Youth due to their reported restorative and healing qualities. This attraction gave birth to the luxurious French Lick Resort that opened in 1845 and continues to be a destination for travelers seeking memorable accommodations. The 443-room hotel was restored to its original grandeur via a $382 million restoration and expansion project that added a 42,000-square-foot casino and restored and reopened the historic “Hill” golf course that originally opened in 1917. Prior to the restoration, the hotel had declined under several different owners. Over the years, it has hosted numerous dignitaries and historic events including the 1931 Democratic Governors Conference where Franklin D. Roosevelt secured support for his party’s presidential nomination. Today, the opulent resort has an array of amenities including a 27,000-square-foot, world-class spa with 24 treatment rooms.

7. Westin Book Cadillac (Detroit, MI)

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The story of most buildings that stand idle for a quarter-century rarely ends well, especially a luxury hotel like the Westin Book Cadillac in downtown Detroit. Originally opened in 1924 as the tallest building in Detroit, the 33-story Hotel Book-Cadillac played host to eight U.S. presidents and the likes of The Beatles, Elvis Presley, Babe Ruth, and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. during its heyday. It boasted more than 1,200 rooms as well as three ballrooms and various restaurants and shops. Its Italian Garden and Venetian Ballroom incorporated architectural elements from Europe, and the hotel was featured in “State of the Union” in 1947, starring Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. Alas, it closed in 1984 as Detroit’s own fortunes began to wane, only to be reborn in 2008 after a $190 million project restored it. Today, it features 455 hotel rooms and 67 luxury condos.

6. Hilton President Kansas City (Kansas City, MO)

Known as the Hotel President when it opened in Kansas City in 1926, the Hilton President Kansas City has lived up to its name. The 453-room hotel hosted the 1928 Republican National Convention where Herbert Hoover received the party’s nomination. Three other U.S. presidents—Eisenhower, Truman, and Nixon—have either stayed or visited the opulent hotel. Its Drum Room lounge became equally famous after opening in 1941, hosting the likes of Benny Goodman, Tommy Dorsey, Glenn Miller, Frank Sinatra, and Sammy Davis, Jr. The hotel closed in 1980 but soon was reborn as a smaller, 213-room luxury hotel following a $45 million restoration. Located in Kansas City’s vibrant Power and Light entertainment district, the Hilton’s immaculate lobby and mezzanine were meticulously restored, and its elegant Congress Ballroom features the original terrazzo floors installed in 1926. It’s Walnut Room restaurant features original stained glass and majestic wood columns as well.

5. West Baden Springs Hotel (West Baden Springs, IN)

Some hotels are famous for their history or their uniqueness and a few like the West Baden Springs Hotel are noted for both. The current West Baden Springs Hotel opened in 1902, but a hotel has occupied the site since 1855. In 1888, it was upgraded to a grand resort for the elite, complete with a casino and opera house. It burned to the ground in 1901 and was rebuilt just a year later with a spectacular circular design topped by an awe-inspiring 200-foot, a free-span dome that was touted as the eighth wonder of the world. The Depression forced the closure of the hotel in 1932 and it later served as a seminary and private college. It reopened in 2007 as part of a special casino district in Indiana after a massive restoration.  The luxurious, 246-room hotel now features a formal garden, an 8,000-square-foot spa, and a 12,000-square-foot indoor pool.

4. The Pfister Hotel (Milwaukee, WI)

When the Pfister Hotel opened in downtown Milwaukee in 1893 at a cost of nearly $1 million, it created quite a stir with unheard of features like individual thermostat controls in each guestroom and electricity throughout the hotel (imagine that). Sporting a Romanesque Revival style, the Pfister also had two billiard rooms (one for both sexes) and a private bar for men only. Owner Charles Pfister utilized the hotel bearing his name to showcase his extensive art collection. Today, the Pfister’s priceless Victorian art is among the world’s top hotel art collections. In 1962, theater operator Ben Marcus purchased the aging hotel at auction. He restored the grand dame of Milwaukee hotels and added a 23-story guestroom tower. The 307-room hotel is now better than ever, with a top-notch spa and a 23rd-floor martini and wine bar with great views of Lake Michigan.

3. Omni William Penn (Pittsburgh, PA)

The Omni William Penn Pittsburgh was once the largest hotel between Pittsburgh and Chicago, with 1,600 guestrooms, when its 600-room, Grant Street Annex addition opened in 1929. The original hotel, opened in 1916 at a cost of $6 million, was industrialist Henry Clay Frick’s dream to build a Pittsburgh landmark to rival the Old World elegance he saw in European hotels. He hired noted architects Franklin Abbott and Benno Janssen to design the hotel, and he spared no expense. The Grand Ballroom on the 17th floor of the original hotel has been lavishly restored. With huge crystal chandeliers and opulent gold and white décor on two levels, the large ballroom looks like a scene from “The Great Gatsby.” Traditional afternoon tea is served at the William Penn, which recently received a multi-million-dollar renovation. It now has 597 guestrooms, 52,000 square feet of function space, and multiple restaurants.

2. Renaissance Cleveland Hotel (Cleveland, OH)

Hotels have occupied the corner of Superior and Public Square in the heart of downtown Cleveland since 1812. Its current occupant, the Renaissance Cleveland, opened in 1918 as a 1,000-room luxury hotel with vaulted ceilings, high arched windows, and an impressive marble fountain in the lobby. It is connected to the Terminal Tower building that opened in 1930 as the city’s rapid transit center. Today, the 52-story Terminal Tower is known as Tower City Center and features shops, restaurants, cinemas, and casinos. After going through several names and owners over the years, the original Hotel Cleveland remains a luxury hotel with 441 guestrooms with marble bathrooms, 50 suites, and three ballrooms among 64,000 square feet of function space. Its aptly-named Grand Ballroom can seat 2,900 people. Its San Souci restaurant features fine dining in elegant surroundings including pastoral murals and wood columns.

1. Omni Severin Hotel (Indianapolis, IN)

The Omni Severin Hotel is one of the last original buildings standing in the Indianapolis Union Station Wholesale District. Built by Henry Severin, Jr. with help from the founders of the famed Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the hotel originally opened in 1913 as the Grand Hotel of Indianapolis. It thrived as a daily stream of train passengers arriving at adjacent Union Station needed a place to stay, and it continues today as the city’s longest-running luxury hotel. Severin’s history is on display throughout the hotel. The original marble staircase remains, as does the crystal chandelier hanging outside the Severin Ballroom. The original 1913 mailbox serves as a working mailbox today, and original furniture from the hotel rests outside the elevator on each floor of the 424-room hotel. Completely modernized while retaining its historic charm, the Severin is connected via skywalks to the downtown Circle Center Mall and Indianapolis Convention Center.

12 Over the Top Stadium Foods to Try This Year

If you are into over the top stadium foods, and not afraid to eat thousands of calories, this is the year to indulge in some crazy foods. From burgers that come complete with half pounds of cheese, nine patties and funnel cakes instead of buns to dessert dogs to vanilla bean apple-pie bacon milkshakes to chicken and waffles that require no cutlery; these over the top stadium foods will either have you begging for more or groaning in stomach pain.

12. Big Mother Funnel Burger – Appleton, Wisconsin

Executive chef Tim Hansen created this monster concoction that debuted at minor league’s Wisconsin Timber Rattlers Stadium. This funnel cake bacon cheeseburger will cost you $20 and contains a whopping 3,500 calories. It consists of 2 funnel cakes dusted with powdered sugar, a 1-lb burger, half a pound of cheese, eight slices of bacon and some lettuce, just to make sure you got your veggies in. We can’t promise that this heart-stopping creation won’t give you a stomach ache but the combination of sweet and beef is well worth it.

Photo by: Timothy Michael Hanson via Twitter
Photo by: Timothy Michael Hanson via Twitter

11. Sweenie Donut Dog – Wilmington, Delaware

This sandwich contains a lot of ingredients that don’t seemingly go together, raspberry jam, bacon, tubular meat and a Krispy Kreme donut. It debuted this year as the Wilmington Blue Rocks stadium and they even let fans choose the name of the dog. The chosen name, is a shout-out to former Blue Rocks player Mike Sweeney, who went on to play for the Kansas City Royals, Seattle Mariners, and the Phillies. This donut dog has a bun made out of a sticky Krispy Kreme donut, with a hot dog in the middle, topped with crumbled bacon and raspberry jam.

Photo by: Our Source University and Information
Photo by: Our Source University and Information

10. Tailgate Stack – Kansas City, Missouri

This sandwich pays tribute to Kansas City’s famous tailgate traditions. The Tailgate Stack features burnt ends topped with cheddar, malted beer grain syrup, bacon and fried egg, all served on a piece of deep fried bread. The Stack will put you back $13 but considering its both breakfast and lunch, we think it’s kind of a steal. Visitors can purchase the Tailgate Stack only at Gridiron Express stands located in sections 103 and 135 of Arrowhead Stadium.

Photo by: The Kansas City Star.
Photo by: The Kansas City Star.

9. Vanilla Bean-Apple Pie-Bacon Milkshake – Cleveland, Ohio

We have heard of bacon apple pie, much in thanks to Pinterest but has anyone ever thought to put it in a milkshake? Apparently Chef Michael Symon who runs the B Spot Restaurant at the Cleveland Browns Stadium thought this would be a wonderful idea. Luckily guests of the restaurant thought so too. This restaurant is actually located on the club level of the stadium so fans will have to shell out serious dough for tickets. This shake even looks delicious with crumbled bacon bits on top, a large straw to slurp through and flickers of vanilla bean throughout. Hold onto your hats Browns fans as this milkshake will knock your socks off.  We suggest making some wealthy fans to eat at this amazing restaurant and hope they pay for your milkshake too.

Photo by: Natalie / Foodspotting
Photo by: Natalie / Foodspotting

8. Chicken and Waffle Cone – Houston, Texas

If you are craving chicken and waffles and prefer to eat something on the go without any sort of cutlery, the Houston Astros have the solution for you. New to the stadium this year is the Chicken and Waffle Cone, and although waffles have been replaced with a cone, you still get that same great taste. What is consists of are pieces of fried chicken, along with mashed potatoes and topped with honey mustard, all stuffed into an easy to eat waffle cone. Although this culinary creation is loaded with calories, the team that produced this cone produced the much loved BBQ baked potato last year and we can assure you that this chicken stuffed waffle cone will be just as big of a hit, if not more.

Photo by: 365 Things to do in Houston
Photo by: 365 Things to do in Houston

7. Triple-Triple Wayback Burger – Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

It contains a remarkable 2,200 calories and the place to get it is at Citizen’s Bank Park. This enormous burger consists of a whopping nine patties and nine slices of cheese, weighing in with 139 grams of fat. It also contains lettuce and tomato, in what looks like an effort to make it look the least bit healthier. Wayback Burgers are the masterminds behind this enormous burger and they can be found at Alley Grill in the stadium. We aren’t quite sure how anyone is going to wrap their mouths around this tall burger, but we cannot wait to see pictures.

Photo by: Wayback Burgers
Photo by: Wayback Burgers

6. Churro Dog – Phoenix, Arizona

Chef Michael Snoke is the man responsible for the invention of this dessert Churro Dog that is now offered at Chase Field, home of the Arizona Diamondbacks. It will set you back about $8.50 and consuming it means consuming over 1100 calories but fans are insisting that it is well worth it. Essentially this dog is a sundae that is designed to look like a hot dog, the churro replaces the dog, A chocolate-glazed Long John doughnut cut in half makes up the bun and instead of the typical hot dog toppings, you get three scoops of vanilla frozen yogurt, a generous serving of whipped cream, and significant drizzles of chocolate and caramel sauces. Every churro dog is made fresh to order and we suggest eating it rather quickly as once it starts to get soggy, things go downhill. There are only two designated churro dog spots in the stadium so prepare to wait with everyone else dying to try this over the top dessert.

Photo by: Jennifer Stewart/Arizona Diamondbacks via ESPN
Photo by: Jennifer Stewart/Arizona Diamondbacks via ESPN

5. Fried Nachos on a Stick – Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Milwaukee truly outdid themselves this year in terms of offering over the top food at their stadiums and fried nachos on a stick are no exception. Appropriately named “Inside the Park” nachos, they can be found at Miller Park, home of the Brewers. Each nacho is stuffed with taco meat, rolled in crushed Doritos, deep fried to a golden crisp and topped with cheese and sour cream. We aren’t sure what kinds of Doritos were used in the making of the deep friend nachos but we can assure you, they picked the right flavor. As an added bonus, this kind of nacho is far less messy than the regular kind and you can keep the stick, as a souvenir, or proof that this food really does exist. Our only question is why didn’t someone come up with this idea earlier?

Photo by: Delaware North Sportservice / Orbitz
Photo by: Delaware North Sportservice / Orbitz

4. Bacon and Sriracha Deviled Eggs – Detroit, Michigan

Detroit has really outdone themselves on this twist of “bacon and eggs” and fans from all over rushed the stadium to try them. Essentially what the culinary team has come up with is a thick slab of flat-top grilled bacon on the bottom with three equally delicious deviled eggs carefully placed on top. These aren’t your typical deviled eggs though. They are made with sriracha and feature fried jalapenos on top. Slightly hard to eat, you may want to make sure you have plenty of napkins on hand for this dish. Deviled eggs lovers will find this concoction at the portable cart at Section 125 and at Michigan Craft Beer, because who doesn’t need a beer to go with their eggs?

Photo by: Go Go Go Gourmet
Photo by: Go Go Go Gourmet

3. Pulled Pork Parfait – Milwaukee, Wisconsin

This stadium food actually has its own Twitter account and although it looks completely unappetizing, fans of the Brewers actually love it. The parfait looks like a typical dessert complete with ice cream but in fact is far from it. Made up of pulled pork, gravy and mashed potatoes; this parfait is served in a parfait cup with a dash of beans on top. It seems as this dish is very American so you may be surprised to learn that it originally made its debut in Canada. Hank Daddy’s BBQ, based in Maple, Ontario, bills itself as the “Original Home of the Pulled Pork Parfait” and debuted the dish back in 2010. Since then companies all over have been replicating it and we see a long strong future ahead of this over the top, weird but delicious parfait.

Photo by: Delaware North Companies / NY Daily News
Photo by: Delaware North Companies / NY Daily News

2. Fried S’mOreo – Dallas, Texas

Texas Rangers fans had something to celebrate when this new dessert dish was introduced to their stadium this year. The Fried S’mOreo looks absolutely delicious, tastes absolutely delicious and we cannot promise it won’t give you a heart attack. So what is it exactly? First off two Oreos are battered and deep fried. A marshmallow is than covered in graham cracker crust and also deep friend. It is placed between the Oreos on a skewer and then the whole shebang is drizzled with an incredible chocolate sauce. In case that wasn’t enough, a side of chocolate is served with it for extra dipping opportunities. At $8 a serving, this heart attack on a skewer isn’t cheap but may just be worth it for the taste.

Photo by: Delaware North / ESPN
Photo by: Delaware North / ESPN

1. Breaded Chicken Waffle Sandwich – St. Louis, Missouri

It was the hottest new food item to hit the stadium in St. Louis this year and the breaded chicken waffle sandwich came out with a bang. The culinary team at the stadium worked long and hard to create this unique dish. Essentially the sandwich consists of a breaded chicken breast that is stuck between two waffles and loaded with maple bacon gravy. The waffles are cooked to order, making them fresh and fluffy while the maple bacon gravy pulls the dish together. This sandwich is served with queso tater tots topped with sour cream and fresh herbs.

Photo by: Susannah Lohr / St. Louis Public Radio
Photo by: Susannah Lohr / St. Louis Public Radio

The 10 Best Brewery Tours in the U.S.

In 2014, the number of craft breweries in the United States topped 3,000. In most cities throughout the country, and in quite a few small towns, it’s pretty easy to find a bar featuring a wide selection of craft beers. If you go straight to the source, you’ll often be well rewarded. From art galleries to souvenir glasses, from obscure facts to samples of rare brews, touring the country’s breweries is both fun and – dare we say it – educational. So many breweries provide fantastic tours that it was difficult to narrow it down to the 10 best, but we managed cook up a list.

10. Boulevard Brewing Company– Kansas City, Missouri

Boulevard began with the goal of providing fantastic beer to the Kansas City area, but it just keeps growing, and its beers are now distributed in 25 states. But that doesn’t mean the brewery has lost its personal touch. Each of the staff that conducts the free 40-minute tour is warm and knowledgeable, and ready to talk you through the different tasting options available at the end. For those ready to dive deeper, Boulevard offers two specialized tours. For $20, the Unfiltered tour offers the chance to see areas off-limits on the general tours and taste limited offerings, while the Smokestack offers a guided tasting session with food pairings.

Photo by: Tech Cocktail via Flickr
Photo by: Tech Cocktail via Flickr

9. Brooklyn Brewery– Brooklyn, New York

Another brewery that builds upon its basic tour with offerings for the true beer geek…er, aficionado. The free tour is short and to the point, ending in the tasting room where you can get five tastes of beers you’re unlikely to find away from the brewery for only $20. The Small Batch Tour, which is limited to 30 people, challenges participants by asserting Brooklyn’s expert guides “can answer just about any beer or Brooklyn Brewery question you can think of.” For $12, you get the tour, a souvenir glass, and four tastings to pour into that glass while the expert outlines exactly what you’re drinking.

Photo by: Jeff Egnaczyk via Flickr
Photo by: Jeff Egnaczyk via Flickr

8. Dogfish Head Brewery– Milton, Delaware

Dogfish Head is one of the more infamous craft breweries in the United States, having been the subject of the Discovery Channel’s Brew Masters and featured in the documentary Beer Wars. Beer lovers know Dogfish is an experimental brewery, loving to combine different spices and fruits for distinctive tastes. The tour reflects the unique vibe of the brewery, taking in the treehouse outside, showing off the state-of-the-art bottling facilities, and inviting guests to play games on the lawn while waiting for their tour to start. After come the samples of the brewery’s standard offerings, while the brewpub in Rehoboth serves the difficult to find beers.

Photo by: fabulousfabs via Flickr
Photo by: fabulousfabs via Flickr

7. Samuel Adams– Boston, Massachusetts

This is the brewery to visit if you want a little history before you get down to the serious business of drinking. The brewery named itself after Samuel Adams, a founding father rumored to be a brewer himself, and the tour includes plenty of tidbits related to both the man and the area. Of course, you also learn plenty about the brewing process on the hour-long tour, and sample a few of the Samuel Adams beers along the way. There’s also a special early tour, called the Morning Mash In, that gives participants the opportunity to taste some of the brewery’s specialty beers.

Photo by: Massachusetts Office of Travel & Tourism via Flickr
Photo by: Massachusetts Office of Travel & Tourism via Flickr

6. Magic Hat Brewing Company– South Burlington, Vermont

Anyone after a distinctive brewery tour must make sure to swing by South Burlington, where Magic Hat entices visitors into its “Artifactory” first with its displays from local artist, then with tantalizing promises of a mysterious and strange ambiance. The brewery’s secrets must be kept, of course, but think of Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory crossed with a trippy circus. Guests have the option to take a guided tour or simply walk through the facility themselves  – either way it’s free, and it comes with four samples of Magic Hat’s characteristic brews.

beer tasting

5. Stone Brewing Company– Escondido, California

If you’ve never tried a beer from Stone Brewing, by the end of this tour you’ll be converted. It’s practically a guarantee: those leading the tours aren’t called guides but rather “indoctrination specialists,” and are known as some of the best in the business. The tour itself lasts about 45 minutes, after which the indoctrination specialist guides participants through a tasting of four of the brewery’s offerings, including one special release. The cost is $3, with $1 from each ticket donated to a local charity. Be sure to check out the beautiful gardens, and do your best to eat at Stone’s bistro after.

Photo by: Stone Brewing Co.
Photo by: Stone Brewing Co.

4. Brewery Ommegang– Cooperstown, New York

Craving a little taste of Europe without leaving the U.S.? Ommegang specializes in Belgian-style brews and provides an idyllic farmhouse setting to go along with them. The brewery is open seven days a week, offering free 30 minute guided tours from entertaining guides. Five dollars buys a sampler of six beers after the tour, along with a souvenir tasting glass. Each summer, the brewery hosts a concert series on its grounds, but the big event of the season is Belgium Comes to Cooperstown, where guests can sample Belgian-style beers offered by over 100 brewers from around the world.

Photo by: Steven Guzzardi via Flickr
Photo by: Steven Guzzardi via Flickr

3. New Belgium Brewing– Fort Collins, Colorado

If you’re headed to Fort Collins, book your New Belgium tour far ahead of time. In busy periods, this popular brewery can fill up weeks in advance. In addition to its delicious, Belgian-inspired beers, New Belgium is known for its progressive views and commitment to sustainability. The company is entirely owned by its employees, and from the 90 minute tour and sampling, it’s obvious they’re enthusiastic about their jobs. New Belgium also brings its enthusiasm to other cities with its Tour de Fat, a bicycling carnival both celebrating beer and enticing others to trade their car keys for bike wheels.

Photo by: Betsy Weber via Flickr
Photo by: Betsy Weber via Flickr

2. Yuengling– Pottsville, Pennsylvania

For the biggest beer nerds, Yuengling might not even register. The brewery doesn’t dabble in experimental flavors or pack as many hops as possible into its ales. But stopping by Pottsville should be a must for anyone interested in the history of beer. Founded in 1829, Yuengling is the oldest brewery in the United States, and the guides fill the 75-minute tours with plenty of facts about the company’s history and the effects of Prohibition. The tour concludes with a trip down to the fermentation caves, where beer was stored before refrigeration, followed by offering up free samples from the current taps.

Photo by: JasonParis via Flickr
Photo by: JasonParis via Flickr

1. Sierra Nevada– Chico, California

The country’s oldest craft brewery wants you to get up close and personal with its beers  – provided that’s what you want, of course. For those who just want to poke their nose around the facilities, a pamphlet is available to help you along a self-guided tour. The free 90-minute tour has participants getting their hands dirty. Literally, as you rub your hands over the hops. The Sustainability Tour takes guests throughout the grounds, finishing with a tasting in a beautiful garden. Finally, the $30 Beer Geek tour provides three fantastic hours to beer nerds, outlining the history of craft brewing while allowing the small group to taste brews right from the tanks.

Photo by: michaelsmithchico via Flickr
Photo by: michaelsmithchico via Flickr

6 Kansas City BBQ Joints That Rule the Grill

They don’t call it the KC strip for nothing. Nor is the mention of “Kansas City barbecue,” “Midwestern ribs,” “Kansas pulled pork,” or “KC Masterpiece” ever used in vein. Each name – whether formal or a phrase – has been working to earn its tradition for decades. Years of flavor and master roasting all pulling for this one, simple fact: Kansas City BBQ is delicious. It’s full of flavor. It’s tangy, spicy, sweet, and smoky – all at once. And you can smell it cooking for miles away. There’s even entire competitions on who’s meat is cooked best. Giving judges and paying spectators alike an incredible way to spend the day; sniffing and taste testing incredible barbecue. Thanks to popular opinion, however, we’ve narrowed down the favorites. Restaurants who’ve received the biggest amounts of praise over the years. After all, just because they can’t agree on a uniform way to spell barbecue – or is that BBQ, bar-b-que, or barbeque? It doesn’t mean they can’t all cook it! The next time you’re in the KC area, remember to stop and get your grub on at:

6. Jack Stack

It’s name might rhyme, but the fun doesn’t stop there. This place goes beyond traditional barbecue meats and adds on additional fare, including lamb, Polish sausage, and even seafood. Much of which is hickory smoked! Wood-grilled, marinaded, and mouth-watering seafood. It might sound weird, but it’s a delicious combination that the locals can’t seem to get enough of. There’s generally a wait, but all who enter say it’s well worth their troubles. Be sure to place on your KC “must stop” list and earn yourself a serious helping of quality meats.

Photo by: No Bull BBQ
Photo by: No Bull BBQ

5. Brobeck’s Barbeque

You know you’re in for a treat when there are ribbons and rave reviews posted right on the walls. Which is exactly what you get when you head into Brobeck’s. Known for their flavorful dry rubs, customers order meats and platters for the delicious scents alone. (Sauces are an option, though most agree they aren’t needed; the meat is that moist.) Order a side of cheesy corn or smoky beans to top off your meal – each of which is served in a personalized crock to help keep them warm. And to add to customer experience, of course.

Photo by: Brobeck's Barbeque/a>
Photo by: Brobeck’s Barbeque/a>

4. LC’s Barbeque

Having been around for years, LC’s is a Kansas City legend. This place makes their own hot sauce (eat it if you dare), and encourages cooks to use it in their own sauces at home. But that’s not their only area of hospitality, the wait staff is as friendly as they come, and will help point newcomers in the right direction. Though, when it comes to LC’s cooking, there really isn’t a wrong path. Just start slow and enjoy each dish they have to offer.

Photo by: LC's Barbeque
Photo by: LC’s Barbeque

3. Arthur Bryant’s

The absolute best barbecue spot in the city has long-since been debated, though Arthur Bryant’s gets regular mention. With the delicious food, there’s no doubt as to why. However, they’re also known for an incredible atmosphere. Where those of all backgrounds (and all dress attire, especially over the lunch hour) come to eat. Stay and socialize or hit the road running. You won’t be disappointed with the food either way.

Photo by: Ochym's Razyr Productions
Photo by: Ochym’s Razyr Productions

2. Woodyard Bar-B-Q

At Woodyard’s you can not only order great meats, you can watch them get smoked. The joint features large trophy smokers, the heart of the restaurant, where customers can watch the pros in action. And if you get lost on the way there, just look up – blowing smoke from the massive stacks can lead you in the right direction. Show up hungry and sample their best sides, or if you can’t decide on a meat, order them all – the place hosts a sampler platter with all eight versions.

Photo by: Woodyard Bar-B-Q
Photo by: Woodyard Bar-B-Q

1. Joe’s Kansas City Bar-B-Que

No list of barbecue joints is complete without Joe’s in the KC area. Around for years and having been renamed from its original “Oklahoma Joe’s,” because after all, it’s not in Oklahoma, this place is often voted best in the area. In fact, it’s so tasty that Anthony Bourdain listed it as “one of thirteen places to eat before you die.” Now that’s a serious compliment. And good explanation as to why you should put it on your BBQ list. Can’t decide what to order? Opt for their Z-Man sandwich, a crowd favorite of brisket provolone, and onion rings, or test out their chicken gumbo on the side of any traditional smoked meats!

Photo by: Joe's Kansas City Bar-B-Que
Photo by: Joe’s Kansas City Bar-B-Que

10 Best Baseball Stadiums to Watch America’s Pastime This Summer

There are few things more American than baseball, and there’s little more enjoyable than staking out a spot in the bleachers to bask in the sun while the players get put through their paces. The key, though, is knowing which ballparks are the best for catching a game. It’s not just about which teams are leading their division. Consider which stadiums have the best sightlines to catch all the action, which offer up spectacular views of their surroundings, and which have unique amenities. We’ve considered all these points and come up with a list of the top 10 Major League Baseball stadiums to visit around the country:

10. Kauffman Stadium -Home of the Kansas City Royals

Kauffman Stadium, just outside Kansas City, Missouri is actually one of the oldest in the major leagues, but you’d never guess it was built in 1973 just by looking. Extensive renovations completed in 2009 make this one of the best places to watch a game. Gaze into the outfield to watch the stadium’s signature feature, the magnificent fountains, and enjoy the feeling of being among some of the friendliest fans in the country. And while you’re in Kansas City, take a trip to the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, which charts the progress of the Negro Leagues and hosts a large collection of artifacts from the period.

Ffooter / Shutterstock.com
Ffooter / Shutterstock.com

9. Safeco Field -Home of the Seattle Mariners

Safeco might have a chance to pull itself higher up the list if the Mariners ever manage to become relevant. But even without any hope of the team challenging in the American League west, Safeco Field remains a beautiful spot to catch a game, particularly on a summer’s evening. Grab a craft beer and a box of sushi, then angle your view toward the Puget Sound for one of Seattle’s gorgeous sunsets. If Seattle’s frequent rain makes this an impossibility, worry not: Safeco Field is one of just two stadiums in the world with a retractable roof, meaning you’ll stay dry no matter the weather.

alens / Shutterstock.com
alens / Shutterstock.com

8. Target Field -Home of the Minnesota Twins

The Twins’ new home, located in downtown Minneapolis, is the newest ballpark in the United States. Even lovers of history won’t miss the crumbling concrete Metrodome, especially once they snuggle up to the fire pits in left field and gaze out over the city skyline. The sightlines are clean and the stadium feels cozy, and because of Target Field’s location, fans can easily walk or take the light rail to the nearby station – especially important after the stadium installed the major leagues’ first self-serve beer stations.

Ffooter / Shutterstock.com
Ffooter / Shutterstock.com

7. Petco Park -Home of the San Diego Padres

Take a stroll through San Diego’s Gaslamp District and you’ll be sure to stumble upon Petco Park. The Padres’ humble home suits the team  – a quietly lovely stadium that doesn’t seek to overshadow its neighbors, instead using its stucco façade to blend in. The sightlines are nearly perfect and it’s practically impossible to get stuck with a bad seat. Even sitting in the “Park in the Park” above the outfield isn’t a hardship, especially for just five dollars. Choose to sit in the bleachers instead, and you’ll have a beautiful view out over San Diego Bay and Balboa Park.

Petco Park

6. Fenway Park -Home of the Boston Red Sox

If you’re a fan of any baseball team not named the Red Sox, you’re likely sick of fans in your hometown who’ve hopped on the Boston bandwagon after the team finally won another World Series title in 2004, but hanging out with the diehards at Fenway will give you a whole new appreciation for the team. The fans that routinely sellout the stadium are knowledgeable and devoted to their boys, and thanks to the closeness of the seats, you’ll quickly feel like one of them. The packed-together atmosphere is just part of the stadium’s charm, along with the hand-operated scoreboard and the Green Monster.

Joyce Vincent / Shutterstock.com
Joyce Vincent / Shutterstock.com

5. Busch Stadium -Home of the St. Louis Cardinals

There are few things more quintessentially American than taking in a baseball game at Busch Stadium on a summer’s day. Named after Anheuser-Busch, headquartered in the city, you’ll certainly have a chance to down a few cold lagers. Even better though, is that you might get invited to a tailgate party happening before the game even starts. Then you’ll move into a packed stadium, filled with fans all proudly wearing red, and take in the view of the St. Louis Arch rising above the city skyline. Or you can even stay outside, watching the game from the sidewalk with other like-minded souls.

Matt McClain / Shutterstock.com
Matt McClain / Shutterstock.com

4. Camden Yards -Home of the Baltimore Orioles

In 1992, Camden Yards forever changed the course of history. The Orioles moved out of Memorial Stadium, a multipurpose arena like so many others used by baseball teams at the time, and into their new retro-chic home. From the brick outside to the incorporation of the old B&O Warehouse in right field to the regional food served on the concourses, Camden Yards was meant to glorify its locale. Other baseball teams followed suit, and almost every stadium built or renovated since the opening of Camden Yards gives a nod to this game changing stadium.

Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock.com
Joseph Sohm / Shutterstock.com

3. PNC Park -Home of the Pittsburgh Pirates

You want to be close to the baseball action? PNC Park is your best bet. This intimate stadium, opened in 2001, boasts that its highest seats are a mere 88 feet from the field, and it certainly has the best sightlines of any major league park. You’ll also get tremendous views of the Pittsburgh skyline’s distinctive architecture, and on game days the Roberto Clemente Bridge is closed to traffic so fans can walk along the Allegheny River to the game. Locals bring their boats and kayaks alongside the stadium, hoping a foul ball will splash into the water nearby.

Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

2. Wrigley Field -Home of the Chicago Cubs

For fans wanting the best old-school atmosphere, nothing beats a day game with the bleacher bums at Wrigley. The park opened in 1914, meaning it’s never seen a Cubs championship, but that doesn’t mean the fans have given up on their home team. Groups congregate on nearby rooftops to watch the games, while kids hope to catch a home run ball out on the sidewalk. The ivy on the outfield walls grows so thick that sometimes players lose a ball they’re chasing, while the enormous scoreboard remains hand-operated. Bypass the seats and put your own bum in the bleachers, where the wonder of Wrigley is best experienced.

Wrigley Field

1. AT&T Park -Home of the San Francisco Giants

Was it this stadium opened in 2000, that led to the Giants capturing three World Series titles since moving in? Considering they didn’t manage even one championship in the 40 years spent at the drafty dungeon of Candlestick Park, this theory might not be too much of a stretch. Their new home is a gorgeous tribute to their city, from the kayaks waiting to fish balls out of McCovey Cove to the delicious local eats. The giant Coca-Cola bottle, complete with slides, and the enormous glove behind left field add whimsical touches, as does the foghorn that blares each time the Giants hit a home run.

Eric Broder Van Dyke / Shutterstock.com
Eric Broder Van Dyke / Shutterstock.com

10 Places in North America to Escape the Heat

It’s been a long, hot summer – and it’s likely to just keep getting hotter. That jug of fresh iced tea isn’t meant to be sipped inside with the shades drawn and that blow-up kiddie pool you’ve outgrown doesn’t have to be your only means of summer heat relief. Because we have good news! There are quite a few places you can go to escape the heat – and none of them involve heading to the Southern Hemisphere. North America provides plenty of watery getaways, but you’ll also find a couple chill cities on this list. Here are the top 10 places to cool off in North America.

10. Vancouver, Canada

Vancouver does get a little warm at times, but for the most part, the cool breezes off the water that nearly surrounds the entire city are a constant relief. While the city’s public transportation is excellent, getting around on foot lets you see all its splendor. Try walking the Granville Bridge for the most perfect views of the city’s glass-fronted skyline, and then, after exploring the public market, take an Aquabus back across False Creek to downtown. If you’re looking for something a little more refreshing, visit one of the cities secluded swimming holes filled with glacier water. It doesn’t get much colder than that! Lynn Canyon is a great place for cliff diving, or to simply sit on a rock with your feet in the frigid water. There’s also Capilano Canyon located next to the Capilano Suspension Bridge where there are even more cliff diving spots, with some as high as 60 feet in the air!

Photo by: GoToVan via Flickr
Photo by: GoToVan via Flickr

9. Six Flags White Water -Atlanta, GA

There’s no denying Atlanta can be hot and sticky in the summer. But drive 30 minutes away to Marietta, and you’ll cool down in Six Flags’ stand-alone water park. Owned by the amusement park operators famous for their gravity-defying roller coasters, you’ll find more than lazy rivers and looping slides here (although they’ve got those as well). The Dive Bomber is White Water’s premier adrenaline rush, with their feet dangling freely in the air, riders are sent plummeting over a hundred feet, nearly straight down. Talk about a nice breeze! Calm your heart in the wave pool or get it racing again in the pitch-black darkness of Black River Falls.

Photo by: Six Flags White Water
Photo by: Six Flags White Water

8. Nova Scotia, Canada

Halifax, the capital of Nova Scotia, barely breaks a sweat in the summer because of its fresh salty ocean air. Take your camera to Lunenburg, a UNESCO World Heritage Site just a little over an hour away. The town looks remarkably similar to the way it did when it was founded in 1753, and its wooden architecture is perfectly picturesque. From Lunenburg, circle the island, photographing the iconic lighthouses along the coast. Then make for Brier Island, an out-of-the-way gem that features some of the best whale-watching in North America. Marine life is guaranteed (so always keep that camera ready!), but the refreshing breezes might be all you need.

Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

7. Upper Peninsula, Michigan

Remember those lazy summer days you spent as a child, barely leaving the water? You can revisit them at Michigan’s Upper Peninsula, where your biggest problem will be choosing which Great Lake to set your towel alongside – Superior? Huron? Michigan? Travel inland where you can cool off in one of the many glacier lakes, or hike to Tahquamenon Falls, the region’s largest waterfall. Explore the cliffs and beaches of Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, here you can take a glass bottom boat tour of Munising Bay to view some of the area’s shipwreck sites, or paddle on your own through sea caves and around the coves of lighthouses.

Tahquamenon Falls, Michigan

6. Rangeley, Maine

Maine’s coastline gets rather crowded in the summer, so head inland to this charming town, located on the edge of Rangeley Lake. Relax in town while wandering through the historic streets, or use it as a jumping-off point to the Rangeley Lakes Region, which consists of six large lakes and hundreds of smaller lakes and ponds, rivers, streams and waterfalls. It’s known as a fisherman’s paradise, but the area also offers up almost every water sport imaginable, as well as hiking trails, lake cruises and beautiful overlooks along the Rangeley Lakes National Scenic Byway.

Rangeley Maine

5. Mexico City, Mexico

Escape the heat in Mexico? Yes, thanks to its mile-high altitude, the country’s capital rarely gets unpleasantly hot. Put aside any misconceptions of Mexico City, as it’s both beautiful and endlessly intriguing. Visitors can poke around the many markets, seek out public spaces displaying the works of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, take in exhibitions featuring Aztec artifacts, or simply sit and sip the lightly-alcoholic beverage known as pulque. Those wanting a bit of exercise can hike Chapultepec Hill, which offers incredible views from its summit, then immerse themselves in a history lesson at its castle, now the National History Museum.

mexico city

4. Schlitterbahn Waterpark -Kansas City, Kansas

Amusement Today named the Verrückt the “World’s Best New Waterpark Ride,” which alone is a reason to visit. It’s the world’s tallest waterslide, and riders are strapped into a raft before being sent flying down a 168-foot drop, then whooshed up a second hill and down another 50 feet. This ride’s so popular that you need to make a reservation when the park opens, but once your group is assigned a ride time, there’s no need to waste time in line. That leaves you free to cool off in one of the many slides and chutes that transport visitors across the park, making it unnecessary to ever leave the water.

Photo by: Schlitterbahn New Braunfels
Photo by: Schlitterbahn New Braunfels

3. Cannon Beach, Oregon

Babies of the ‘80s will quickly recognize Cannon Beach’s most prominent feature, Haystack Rock, from when the Goonies are checking their map for buried treasure. Ecola State Park might also be familiar to fans of the Twilight movies. But for Oregonians and visitors alike, Cannon Beach is simply a beautiful place to escape the summer’s heat. Even when temperatures push 100 inland, you might need a sweatshirt to walk the sand here. Oregon’s beaches aren’t meant for swimming – unless you’ve got a wet suit – but the dramatic, jagged coastline and the misty morning views will more than make up for it.

Cannon Beach, Oregon

2. Wrangell St. Elias National Park, Alaska

If seeing the continent’s tallest peak isn’t on your bucket list, then skip Denali National Park in favor of the second best with a truer wilderness experience at Wrangell St. Elias National Park. Mount St. Elias weighs in as the second-highest mountain, and along with two neighboring parks, the 24-million-acre wilderness park is the largest internationally protected area. Summer is short, the mountains retain their snowcap all year long, and you can kayak through Icy Bay. This area is also where you’ll find Bagley Ice Field, over 100 miles long, as well as the Malaspina glacier, which is bigger than Rhode Island.

Wrangell St. Elias National Park

1. CHILL Ice House -Toronto, Canada

It might seem strange to build an ice bar in Toronto, where temperatures are near freezing half the year. But wise men and women looking to escape the heat should not only come to this city, where temperatures are rarely stifling, but also get themselves to the CHILL Ice House. Upon entry, guests put on hats and gloves, plus a digital watch that tracks purchases, so no one needs to feel their fingers freeze when handing over cash. Kids are welcome to come and gawk at the frozen interior until 8 p.m., but after that adults remove their coats and head to the speakeasy to sip drinks from ice cold glasses.

Photo by: CHILL Ice House
Photo by: CHILL Ice House

The 8 Best States to Experience American BBQ

In the world of barbecue things get personal. Tempers run high, differences in regions vary greatly and everyone believes they truly produce the best in barbecue. When we talk barbecue we are not talking about grilling a couple of steaks. Barbecue here means mastering the technique of cooking meat for long periods of time at low temperatures with smoke from a wood fire. Competitions are held throughout the nation, barbecue joints are constantly being judged and this growing debate shows no signs of slowing down. There is one thing for sure though; these eight states certainly know how to produce exceptional American barbecue.

8. Florida

You may not think that Florida would be the place to experience some of the best American barbecue, but they are home to some amazing old-fashioned down-home slow cooking barbecue. In fact not one, but three Florida barbecue joints made it onto the top 10 list of the best barbecue restaurants in the United States put out by TripAdvisor. Classics such as ribs and pulled pork sandwiches are available at numerous joints around the state and the constant nice weather allows for this style of cooking to hang around all year. If you thought that Florida wasn’t considered to be “The South” in terms of cooking, think again.

Beach BBQ

7. South Carolina

No one does sauces quite like South Carolina and no one will dare argue with the locals that there barbecue isn’t one of the best in the nation. Cities such as Columbia, Charleston and Greenville have numerous restaurants serving up the classics with the infamous sauces. For it is the sauces that make the barbecue according to locals and most of all, the mustard-style sauce. South Carolina even has a BBQ Trail Map which gives visitors the lowdown on all the barbecue joints across the state, including where to find them, how to get there and which sauces they use. Hailed as the birthplace of barbecue, South Carolina knows how to do it right.

BBQ Ribs

6. New York

Southerners may turn up their nose at this suggestion but the truth is New Yorkers have finally figured out the art of the barbecue and are making waves all over the nation competing with the best of the best. Restaurant owners have invested in high quality proper wood-fueled smokers, hired the best chefs and are producing many classics such as pulled pork, boneless beef ribs and apple cured chicken. New York is currently home to at least eight or 10 amazing barbecue spots, each competing with one another to be on top. Prepare yourself for down-home dishes, fall off the bone meat and innovative sides that are taking barbecue to a new level, New York style.

New Orleans Restaurants 13

5. Georgia

Georgia can certainly claim that it is one of the best states to experience American barbecue seeing as the restaurant that was named number one in the top 10 list of the best barbecue restaurants in the United States put out by TripAdvisor was from here. Georgia barbecues are an eclectic mix of ingredients and styles drawn from all over the American South resulting in some delicious eats. Whether it is pit-smoked, oven-smoked or on the grill, the one thing you can expect from a Georgia barbecue is that the meat is going to be slow cooked. This state also specializes in the famous Brunswick stew, a classic that involves taking the various smoked meats and sauces and combining them with butter beans, tomatoes and corn, among other things.

Steak on the grill

4. North Carolina

There are thousands of barbecue joints in North Carolina, in fact the city of Lexington has self-proclaimed itself to be the barbecue capital of the world. Where you go in this state depends on what type of barbecue you will experience as they do things differently in the East and West. Eastern NC uses the whole hog with a tangy vinegar sauce while the Western part of the state only uses the meat from above the shoulder and the sauce is more tomato based. Like their Southerly neighbors; this state has its own Historic Barbecue Trail, a route that links about 25 joints and places across the state which changes annually.

Texas BBQ (2)

3. Missouri

The place to visit in Missouri is Kansas City as they have spent years building their culinary reputation by slowly and patiently smoking meat, and doing it excellently. The city of Kansas itself is home to over 100 barbecue joints and many highly regarded barbecue cooking contests. Each barbecue spot has its own specialty and one could spend a lifetime sampling the different varieties throughout the state. This state is unique in that it doesn’t necessarily just consider pork to be barbecue, the joints here use a variety of meats. If you ever wanted to witness the who’s who of barbecue, head to Missouri where the The American Royal World Series of Barbecue takes place and is considered the largest barbecue contest in the world.

Photo by: Visit Missouri
Photo by: Visit Missouri

2. Tennessee

Memphis is the city to be in if you are looking for true American BBQ in this state. Pork ribs are the most iconic Memphis specialty, and the most famous ribs here are served dry. Memphis sauce tends to be vinegar based, with a sweet flavor of tomato to it and some joints love to add a little spice. But this state doesn’t just stop at ribs, it excels at all forms of pork. Beef is pretty much non existent except once a year when brisket and beef ribs hit the grill at the World Kosher Barbecue Championship. Outside of the city barbecue joints are known for their wood-smoked whole hog, sometimes taking as long as 20 hours to smoke it before pulling, chopping and slicing it up.

BBQ

1. Texas

Few people will disagree that the state of Texas is the best place to experience real American barbecue. Texas is unique in that is has different styles of barbecue throughout the state. In central Texas the most popular barbecue is brisket, sausage and pork ribs that are served with salt and pepper and smoked over oak coals; a method many Southerners say is not ‘true’ barbecue. East Texas barbecue on the other hand is a direct descendant of the South’s barbecue, brought to the region by slaves who arrived to farm cotton in the 1800s. This traditional method is smoking pork shoulder, sausage, brisket, and pork ribs. Austin, Houston, Dallas; all these cities offer so many different barbecue joints it can be hard to choose where to start.

Southern BBQ