25 Most Dangerous Cities In The US In 2020

The United States is ripe with amazing cities to live in and travel to (in fact, here are some of our favorite cities to visit in the US). Despite ongoing concerns over firearm violence in America, the country as a whole is safer than you might realize. In fact, with a violent crime rate of 369 incidents committed for every 100,000 people in 2018, the U.S. is statistically the safest it’s been in the last three decades. Unfortunately, safety can look quite different at a local level than it does nationally. When it comes to individual cities, there are definitely some that are considered more dangerous than others.

Using the FBI’s most recent crime data from its 2018 Uniform Crime Reporting Program, we’ve ranked the cities with the highest violent crime rates in the country. This population-adjusted statistic measures all violent crimes and is a useful tool for determining how dangerous a city is.

We should note that just because a city is declared dangerous, doesn’t mean it should be avoided altogether. You’ll find there are safe neighborhoods in even the worst cities. Still, we’d recommend exercising caution if you’re thinking of traveling to one of the following 25 cities, which rank as the most dangerous cities in the U.S. in 2020.

25. Chattanooga, Tennessee

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,048
Property Crimes Per 100k: 6,058

Surrounded by mountains and nestled along the Tennessee River, Chattanooga more than lives up to its official nickname of “Scenic City”. However, those looking to explore the great outdoors in Chattanooga should take heed of the city’s high violent crime rate. While homicides were low, the city experienced 783 cases of aggravated assault per 100,000 people in 2018 — more than triple the national average.

The good news is that local authorities are taking steps to address the problem. More than 30 surveillance cameras have been installed across the city over the last three years to help increase public safety in Chattanooga’s most dangerous areas.

Source: Shutterstock

24. Beaumont, Texas

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,059
Property Crimes Per 100k: 3,783

With a violent crime rate of 1,059 per 100,000 residents, Beaumont just narrowly tops Houston as the most dangerous major city in the Lone Star state. Much like Chattanooga, Beaumont has an aggravated assault problem, with a whopping 798 reported in 2018. In 2019, Beaumont has also experienced more homicides than the previous year and city officials are desperate to change the narrative.

“Per ca-pita, we are the murder capital of the state of Texas, and we want to change that, we’re not satisfied with that,” said Jefferson County District Attorney Bob Wortham.

The Beaumont Police Department has implemented a high tech tool to help curb firearm violence. Known as the National Integrated Ballistic Information Network, the tool allows authorities to better track firearms used in different crimes.

Source: Shutterstock

23. Tulsa, Oklahoma

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,065
Property Crimes Per 100k: 5,430

While it may not be under attack by masked criminals like in HBO’s hit 2019 series Watchmen, the real-life city of Tulsa is still a dangerous place. In fact, based on its violent crime rate, Tulsa is the most dangerous major city in the state of Oklahoma.

While there’s a lot to love about Tulsa, including a thriving craft beer scene and a world-renowned art museum, its violent crime rate is not one of them. Firearm violence, in particular, has been a major problem for Tulsa, which has prompted police to more than double the number of firearms confiscated since 2011.

Source: Shutterstock

22. Hartford, Connecticut

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,066
Property Crimes Per 100k: 3,602

The capital city of Connecticut, Hartford is also known as the “Insurance Capital of the World” thanks to the many insurance companies headquartered there. It also holds the distinction of being one of the oldest cities in the United States and a great destination for history buffs. In spite of these distinctions, Hartford is a city currently suffering through a high crime rate and economic woes.

Hartford’s violent crime rate of 1,066 incidents per 100,000 people can be at least partly attributed to the city’s high unemployment and poverty. The unemployment rate (7.0%) and poverty rate (30.5%) are both well above the national average of 3.9% and 14.9%, respectively.

Source: Shutterstock

21. Lansing, Michigan

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,108
Property Crimes Per 100k: 3,030

The capital of Michigan (that’s right, it’s not Detroit!), Lansing is home to Michigan State University — one of the largest universities in the country — and is an important cultural, commercial, and industrial hub. Unfortunately, Lansing is held back by higher than average violent crime and poverty. The city’s main issue is aggravated assault, which accounted for nearly 74% of the 1,301 violent crimes reported in 2018.

The good news is the Department of Justice awarded Michigan more than $122 million earlier this year to help curb violent crime, so the situation stands to get better in Lansing going forward.

Source: Shutterstock

20. Nashville, Tennessee

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,113
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,011

With its unbeatable live music scene and an amazing selection of bars and restaurants, it’s no surprise Nashville is one of the most popular tourist destinations in the US. But what you won’t find on your typical list of the best things to do in Nashville are the city’s crime statistics, which are actually quite alarming.

Believe it or not, Nashville’s violent crime rate is more than triple the national average, with aggravated assaults leading the way. In fact, the city’s Metro Police reported that aggravated assaults were up 23% in 2019, which suggests things may be getting worse in Nashville.

However, this doesn’t mean you should cancel your trip to “Music City, USA”. As long as you take precautions and avoid Nashville’s most dangerous spots, there’s no reason you can’t safely take in the Grand Ole Opry.

Source: Shutterstock

19. New Orleans, Louisiana

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,163
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,557

The home of Creole cuisine and Mardi Gras, New Orleans is one of the most unique cities in the United States. But while the city has benefited greatly from redevelopment efforts in the wake of Hurricane Katrina’s mass devastation, crime continues to be a major issue in “The Big Easy”.

Homicides are especially high in New Orleans, with the city’s homicide rate (37 per 100,000 people) ranking fifth-highest among mid – to large-size American cities. Fortunately, the 141 homicides New Orleans saw in 2018 were actually the lowest total since 1971 and that downward trend has continued in 2019, so things might be looking up for Louisiana’s most populous city.

Source: Shutterstock

18. Wichita, Kansas

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,179
Property Crimes Per 100k: 5,618

Wichita is the largest city in the state of Kansas and a major aeronautical hub, earning it the nickname of “The Air Capital of the World”. While Wichita’s unemployment and poverty rates fall within national averages, the city has experienced a “precipitous increase” in violent crime over the last three years.

The situation has gotten bad enough that earlier this year, Wichita sought federal help. The city is now a participant in the U.S. Department of Justice National Safety Partnership, a national program that aims to drive down crime. The three-year program provides training and technical assistance to the Wichita Police Department at no extra cost.

Source: Shutterstock

17. Indianapolis, Indiana

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,272
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,129

Home to the Pacers and Colts, Indianapolis is also where you’ll find the world’s largest children’s museum and one of the largest privately funded zoos in the country. The city is an economic hub for the state of Indiana and boasts an unemployment rate lower than the national average. Unfortunately, Indianapolis’s violent crime rate makes it the most dangerous city in the state, with hate crimes and firearm violence, in particular, standing out as pain points.

The good news is that Indianapolis has made great strides in tackling its firearm problems in recent years. There are now several intervention programs in place, including firearm buyback events designed to get firearms off the streets.

Source: Shutterstock

16. Oakland, California

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,273
Property Crimes Per 100k: 5,390

For years, Oakland has struggled to break free of its reputation as a dangerous city. Unfortunately, statistics only help support the reality of Oakland being one of the most dangerous places to live in California. While the city’s violent crime rate did go down a bit in 2018, it still sits nearly four times the national average. The robbery rate in Oakland (610 incidents per 100,000 people) is especially concerning, trailing only Baltimore as the highest in the country.

There is reason to be optimistic about crime prevention in Oakland though. The city’s police department now uses a high tech program developed in nearby Silicon Valley called Law Enforcement Analysis Portal to help collect and analyze large amounts of crime data.

Source: Shutterstock

15. Anchorage, Alaska

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,309
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,927

Home to more than 41% of Alaska’s entire population, Anchorage is an important northern economic center that boasts spectacular views (six different mountain ranges make up its skyline). Sadly, along with being the most northern capital city in the U.S., Anchorage holds the unfortunate distinction of being the country’s sexual assault capital.

With 210 reported sexual assaults for every 100,000 people, Anchorage has the highest rate of any US city with a population of at least 100,000. The reasons for this are complex but it’s not just Anchorage suffering from violent crimes. Alaska as a whole is considered the most dangerous state for women, with 59% of women who live there having experienced violence.

Source: Shutterstock

14. Springfield, Missouri

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,316
Property Crimes Per 100k: 7,019

Home to three universities — Missouri State University, Drury University, and Evangel University — Springfield has the look and feel of your average midwestern college town. However, this unassuming city has a surprisingly high violent crime rate, nearly three times that of Missouri as a whole.

In an effort to curb violent crime, Springfield Police recently formed the “Career Criminal Task Force” alongside the FBI to target repeat offenders. “We’re going to go after the bad guys and we’re going to put them in jail. People deserve to feel safe,” Missouri Attorney General Eric Schmitt told KSPR.

Source: Shutterstock

13. San Bernardino, California

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,333
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,135

Home to the very first McDonald’s restaurant (now a McDonald’s Museum), San Bernardino is an inland California city that lies along the iconic Route 66. Unfortunately, the city has become better known for its struggling economy over the last 25 years. The closing of Norton Air Force Base in 1994 cost San Bernardino 10,000 jobs and the city has never truly recovered.

San Bernardino was declared America’s second poorest city behind Detroit in 2011 and while things have somewhat improved, more than 30% of residents still live below the poverty line. Areas with limited economic opportunities tend to have high crime, so it’s little surprise the violent crime rate in San Bernardino is nearly four times the national average.

Source: Shutterstock

12. Albuquerque, New Mexico

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,364
Property Crimes Per 100k: 6,179

Although it never had to deal with a drug kingpin named Heisenberg, the real-life Albuquerque, New Mexico has crime problems of its own. Incidents of sexual assault and homicide are more than double the national average, while aggravated assaults are three times as common.

The fact that Albuquerque accounts for half of all crime in New Mexico while only being home to a quarter of the state’s population prompted the city’s mayor Tim Keller to ask for state help. We’ll have to wait until the FBI releases its 2020 data to see if the situation in Albuquerque improves.

Source: Shutterstock

11. Rockford, Illinois

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,386
Property Crimes Per 100k: 3,671

Although Chicago is probably the first city that springs to mind when you think of crime in Illinois, the Windy City is actually not the most dangerous place in the state. With a violent crime rate of 1,386 incidents per 100,000 people, Rockford stands as the most dangerous city in Illinois.

Despite economic revitalization efforts creating new jobs in the automotive, aerospace, and healthcare industries over the last few decades, Rockford continues to struggle economically. Both its unemployment rate (6.8%) and poverty rate (22.2%) sit well above national averages.

Source: Shutterstock

10. Stockton, California

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,399
Property Crimes Per 100k: 3,768

With a violent crime rate of 1,399 incidents per 100,000 people, Stockton ranks as California’s most dangerous city and the 10th most dangerous in the country. Home to the oldest university in California — The University of the Pacific — Stockton has a rich history, being one of the hubs of the 19th century Gold Rush.

Unfortunately, the 2008 financial crisis hit Stockton especially hard and in 2012, it became the largest city in US history to file for bankruptcy protection (Detroit would surpass it the following year). Despite exiting bankruptcy in 2013, job opportunities in Stockton remain slim, with 6.9% of the city’s labor force unemployed in 2018.

Source: Todd A. Merport / Shutterstock.com

9. Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,413
Property Crimes Per 100k: 2,971

Milwaukee is often associated with its proud brewing tradition and cold Midwestern winters; not violent crime. Alas, with 1,413 violent crimes for every 100,000 people, the home of the Bucks is not only the most dangerous city in Wisconsin but the United States as a whole. Researchers have pointed to segregation and the opioid crisis being major factors behind Milwaukee’s violence, though a poverty rate nearly doubles the national average also hasn’t helped matters.

Much like the young Parkland survivors, Milwaukee’s youth have become heavily involved in violence prevention. 414LIFE and other organizations are currently working to establish a youth violence interruption coalition in the city’s school system.

Source: Shutterstock

8. Little Rock, Arkansas

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,446
Property Crimes Per 100k: 6,547

Don’t let the name fool you. Despite having a name one would associate with a quaint American town, Little Rock has a shockingly high crime rate. In 2018, the city saw 1,446 violent crimes for every 100,000 people, nearly quadruple the national rate.

Property crime is also a major problem in Little Rock, with non-violent crimes like burglary and larceny leading the way. The city’s property crime rate ranks third among U.S. cities with populations of 100,000 or more. It’s a shame too, as Little Rock does have some decent attractions and boasts great walks down by the Arkansas River.

Source: Shutterstock

7. Cleveland, Ohio

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,449
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,411

Crime is a serious issue in all major Ohio cities with the exception of Columbus, which does not rank on the FBI’s list of the 50 most dangerous U.S. cities. Out of all of them, Cleveland has the unfortunate distinction of being the most dangerous city in Ohio.

Despite thriving healthcare and tech sectors, Cleveland has alarming poverty and unemployment figures. 6.5% of the labor force is out of work, while a staggering 35.2% of the population live below the poverty line. These factors have helped drive a violent crime rate four times the national average.

Source: Shutterstock

6. Kansas City, Missouri

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,590
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,306

The biggest question most people have about Kansas City is, “Why isn’t it in Kansas?” But the question we really should be asking is, “Why is the city so violent?” After all, poverty isn’t a major problem in Kansas City and its unemployment rate is actually lower than the national average.

And yet, violent crime is out of control in Kansas City, with the city on course to see a record number of homicides in 2019. A 4-year wave of firearm violence has left Kansas City grasping for solutions. However, firearm violence is a problem across Missouri as a whole, meaning KC will likely have to wait for a solution to be found at the state level.

Source: Shutterstock

5. St. Louis, Missouri

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,800
Property Crimes Per 100k: 5,911

Believe it or not, Kansas City is not the most dangerous place in Missouri. That title goes to St. Louis, a major economic hub and home to ten Fortune 500 companies. Unfortunately, low unemployment has done little to curb violence in St. Louis, which saw 187 homicides in 2018.

When adjusted for population, St. Louis’s homicide rate of 61 incidents per 100,000 people make it the homicide capital of the U.S. In recent years, fed up residents have been putting pressure on Missouri lawmakers to change the state’s firearm laws. But with no solutions in sight, it may be some time before St. Louis residents see any relief.

Source: Shutterstock

4. Baltimore, Maryland

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,833
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,495

Baltimore, Maryland is a city obsessed with preservation. Nearly one-third of the city’s buildings are designated as historic, more than any other U.S. city. Unfortunately, recent history is something the city’s residents likely want to forget, as Baltimore continues to rank as one of the country’s most dangerous places.

With 309 recorded homicides in 2018, Baltimore is easily one of the most violent and dangerous major cities in America. The city’s homicide rate of 51 per 100,000 only trails St. Louis while the robbery rate of 837 incidents per 100,000 people is the highest in the country. According to the New York Times, violent crime has spiked since the infamous passing of Freddie Gray in 2015 and it’s showing no signs of getting better anytime soon.

Source: Shutterstock

3. Birmingham, Alabama

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,911
Property Crimes Per 100k: 6,313

Once known as “The Magic City”, today Birmingham is the most populous city in Alabama and one of the largest banking centers in the U.S. Yet for all its economic successes, Birmingham has an alarming crime rate that sits 112% higher than the national average. Aggravated assaults are the primary concern, as they accounted for nearly 70% of all violent crimes reported in 2018.

The homicide rate is also shockingly high. Although the 88 homicides the city saw in 2018 is much lower than other cities on this list, the homicide rate is actually third highest in the country once the population is taken into account.

Source: Shutterstock

2. Memphis, Tennessee

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 1,943
Property Crimes Per 100k: 6,405

With a violent crime rate of 1,943 incidents per 100,000 people, Memphis, Tennessee ranks as the most dangerous city in America’s south. One could argue that violence is just as much a part of Memphis’s identity as blues music and barbeque. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated in Memphis in 1968 and since the Civil Rights Movement, the city has become ground zero for some of the worst firearm violence in the country.

In fact, the majority of the city’s 186 homicides last year were firearm-related. Recently, U.S. Attorney General William Barr unveiled a new plan to reduce firearm violence in Memphis, Project Guardian, so hopefully, Memphis will start to see some relief in the coming years.

Source: f11photo / Shutterstock.com

1. Detroit, Michigan

Violent Crimes Per 100k: 2,007
Property Crimes Per 100k: 4,304

The Motor City just can’t seem to catch a break. While most major U.S. cities continue to grow, Detroit has seen one of the steepest population declines over the last half-century. At its peak, the city was home to 1.8 million people in the 1950s. But the decline in manufacturing jobs has driven the population down to less than 700,000 today. The city’s massive unemployment and poverty rates (9% and 37.9%, respectively) amount to a city with the highest violent crime rate in the country.

Today, large swaths of Detroit lie abandoned; a living reminder of the city’s decline. Unfortunately, until Detroit’s public administration gets its act together and starts attracting business and economic growth, its status as America’s most dangerous city will only continue.

Source: Shutterstock

25 Most Dangerous Cities In The US In 2019

When it comes to travel, one of the most important things to consider is safety. Most people would assume safety is something they have to worry about when traveling to other countries where they don’t speak the same language or are unfamiliar with the culture, and while that is true, there is also a risk of danger even closer to home. You might be surprised to learn there are many cities within the United States that aren’t exactly all peaches and cream. You wouldn’t want to walk around alone at night or wander aimlessly as a tourist in any of the following cities on this list because they’re considered to be the most dangerous in America.

This list was created based off information from the FBI’s crime statistics which were gathered from US cities with a population over 100,000 between January 2017 and June 2017. The data looks specifically at the amount of violent crimes in a city which includes rape, robbery, and aggravated assault. It’s important to note that the data used to create this Uniform Crime Report is collected voluntarily by police forces in cities across the country and not every city or state chooses to participate, so this list doesn’t necessarily give the full picture. However, it does give a big picture look at some of the more dangerous cities which can be helpful for people who are planning their next big city vacation in 2019.

Here’s a look at some of the most dangerous cities in the U.S. in 2019…

25. Lansing, Michigan

First up on this list is the capital of Michigan, Lansing. Business Insider reported that this city experienced 52.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents which converts to about 14 homicides in the year 2017. Unfortunately, unlike most cities where crime rates are going down, this was the highest it had been in the previous five years.

In 2017 the poverty rate was 29.5-percent and the unemployment rate sat at about 6.3-percent. Police Chief Mike Yankowski told the Lansing State Journal that their high crime rates were due to domestic violence and mental illness.

24. Minneapolis, Minnesota

Minneapolis is best known for being a very diverse and artsy city, but now it’s also known as one of the most dangerous cities in the U.S. When considering a trip to this city in 2019, just remember that it didn’t fare so well in 2017. Only two years ago the violent crime rates were pretty high in Minneapolis with a rate of about 53.7 per 10,000 residents, according to Business Insider.

USA Today translates this violent crime rate to 1,101 per 100,000 residents with a grand total of 42 homicides in 2017. The poverty rate was 21.3-percent and the unemployment rate was 3.1-percent.

23. New Orleans, Louisiana

New Orleans is actually a pretty popular tourist hotspot, mainly because if its vibrant music scene, rich history, and round the clock party atmosphere. However what many people don’t often talk about is the fact that it’s actually quite dangerous, statistically. Business Insider writes that this city had 56.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents in 2017 and 24/7 Wall St. notes that the city has some of the highest murder rates.

USA Today writes that in 2017 this touristy city had a violent crime rate of 1,121 per 100,000 residents and 157 homicides. The poverty rate here was 26.2-percent with an unemployment rate of 5.1-percent. Luckily mayor LaToya Cantrell has vowed to do something about it with a new program called Cure Violence.

Photo by: Bill Staney via Flickr

22. Newark, New Jersey

You’d think we’d see New York City on here ahead of one in New Jersey, but surprisingly, Newark is more prone to violence than the big apple (at least when population is factored in). In fact New York City is actually one of the safest big cities in the country. Not too far away is the city of Newark, New Jersey, one of the most dangerous cities in America. Business Insider writes that Newark had 42.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents in 2017.

In 2016 there were 36 murders per 100,000 Newark residents which was about three times higher than any other city in New Jersey and the fifth highest in the country, at the time. One of the biggest factors in this city is unemployment. Cities with high unemployment rates tend to have more crime and Newark had an unemployment rate of about 8-percent which is about 5-percent higher than the national average. The poverty rate in 2016 was 29.7-percent which is also 15.5-percent higher than the national average. Not surprisingly, most of the crime takes place in the cities poorest areas, writes 24/7 Wall St. A report by the Safer Newark Council found that most of the violent crime occurred in only about 20-percent of the city streets, primarily in the West and South Wards. The report also said most of the homicide in the city is drug and gang related.

21. San Bernardino, California

In addition to being known as the site for the world’s first McDonald’s and the largest outdoor amphitheater in the United States, San Bernardino also has a reputation for being one of the most dangerous cities in the country (according to 2017 statistics) and the largest city to file for protection under Chapter 9 of the U.S. Bankruptcy code. This bankruptcy plays a huge role in the crime rate of this city because there have been major cutbacks to the police force.

In 2017 there were 1,291 violent crimes reported which includes murder, rapes, robberies, and aggravated assaults. This is the 15th highest in the entire country. USA Today reports that in 2017 San Bernardino had a violent crime rate of 1,291 per 100,000 residents, there were 34 homicides, and the city experienced a poverty rate of 32.3-percent with an unemployment rate of 6.3-percent.

20. Indianapolis, Indiana

When planning a trip in 2019, keep in mind that Indianapolis had a violent crime rate of 1,334 per 100,000 residents in 2017 which was one of the worst years this city has ever seen. As Indiana’s capital city, Indianapolis, sometimes referred to as ‘Indy’ is densely populated with an estimated population of about 863,002. On Dec. 28, 2017 Fox 59 reported there were 156 homicides in this city. This goes alongside a poverty rate of 20.9-percent and an unemployment rate of 3.6-percent. According to the FBI Uniform Crime Report, the violent crime rate in Indianapolis in 2017 was about 1,334 crimes per 100,000 residents.

19. Stockton, California

California is an extremely popular vacation spot, but it’s also an extremely big state with lots of cities, some nicer than others. We’re sure Stockton would be a lovely place to visit in 2019, but we think tourists should be wary about the unusually high crime rate here, especially in 2019 considering it wasn’t that long ago that the country claimed bankruptcy and landed on many lists as one of the U.S. cities with the highest crime rates. According to 2017 reports, this city had 68.8 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

The city claimed bankruptcy back in 2012 making it one of the most populous cities to do so. The lack of funding could possibly affecting their ability to fight crime by limiting the amount of resources available. The violent crime rate in 2017 was 1,415 per 100,000 residents with a total of 55 homicides. The unemployment rate was 8-percent, which is among the highest in the country, and the poverty rate was 23.7-percent.

18. Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Milwaukee is the largest city in Wisconsin. It’s a beautiful city that has a stunning waterfront along Lake Michigan. To a lot of tourists, this city is known for its cultural events and festivals and for those who live here, it’s a great city that has tons of stuff to do and a booming economy with several universities and Fortune 500 companies, but there is one major thing to be wary about when traveling to this city. It’s has high crime rates. In fact, according to crime reports presented by the FBI for the year 2017,  Milwaukee had a violent crime rate of 1,597 per 100,000. This ranks as the seventh highest in the entire country and means that for every 10,000 residents in Milwaukee there were 75.6 violent crimes in 2017.

USA Today takes a deeper look and reports that there were 118 homicides in this city in 2017, along with a poverty rate of 28.4-percent and an unemployment rate of 4.6-percent. Luckily, the amount of homicides is actually going down. In 2016 it was 141 which is slightly higher than 2017. It seems the Milwaukee Police Department are working hard to lower these numbers by focusing their attention on a two-mile section, where most of these crimes occur.

17. Kansas City, Missouri

We’re not in Kansas anymore Toto! Okay, so it’s not the same Kansas as Wizard of Oz, but close enough. Turns out the state of Missouri is much more dangerous than the state of Kansas, specifically Kansas City (and St. Louis, but more on that later on). You might be wondering what this city is doing on this list considering it was just praised for doing such a good job bringing their homicide rate down. Unfortunately, it was short lived and it’s once again on the rise again. Be wary of this when planning a trip in 2019.

USA Today crunched the numbers from 2017 and found that Kansas City had a violent crime rate of 1,724 per 100,000 residents. There were 150 homicides which is up from the 129 in 2016. In addition to that, the unemployment rate was 4.3-percent and the poverty rate sat at about 18.3-percent.

Sharon Day / Shutterstock.com

16. Rockford, Illinois

You might not have ever heard of Rockford Illinois, but it’s actually the third largest city in Illinois and surprisingly, one of the most violent. While it’s not nearly as bad as Chicago and the number of homicides was actually quite low in 2017. There were only 18 murders reported that year. Rockford is still no walk in the park in terms of safety because homicide is not their biggest problem. According to data collected from 2017, Rockford had 78 violent crimes per 10,000 residents. There were 1,773 aggravated assault cases reported in 2017 which is a lot more than many other cities with the same population. For example, Naperville, Illinois has an even bigger population than Rockford and it’s reported cases of aggravated assault were only 80.

USA Today reports there was a violent crime rate of 1,588 per 100,000 residents and lists an unemployment rate of 7.5-percent and a poverty rate of 22.7-percent. Luckily, this city isn’t exactly a hot tourist spot, especially considering it’s in the same state of Chicago which is one of the most visited cities in the country, so Rockford often gets overlooked.

15. Birmingham, Alabama

Located in the South, Birmingham is the most populous city in Alabama and is often associated as being part of the “deep south.” Sadly, in addition to its southern roots, this city lands in the top 5 on Business Insider’s list of the most violent cities in the U.S., as well as Forbes top 5. Business Insider writes that Birmingham, Alabama had 86.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents in 2017 and Forbes writes that there were 1,483 violent crimes per 100,000 residents.

If we wanted to look on the bright side of all this, Birmingham is actually making progress despite the fact that it’s still quite dangerous. The crime here is down 40-percent from what it was in the mid-1990s. Forbes writes that according to the U.S. Census Department, much of the crime in this city is due to the high drug trade and the high poverty rate. The poverty rate in Birmingham is 26-percent. This is quite a lot considering the state average is 17-percent.

14. Nashville, Tennessee

There’s no denying that Nashville is having a bit of a moment in terms of tourism. In the past few years this city has been crawling with tourists between the months of May and September. What most people probably don’t realize is that this city is actually statistically one of the more dangerous cities in the country.

In the year 2017 there were 110 homicides in the Nashville metropolitan area. Also, the crime rate was 1,138 per 100,000 residents and the poverty rate sat at about 18-percent. The murder rate in this city is so bad that the Oasis Center of Nashville which works to help at risk youth in the area called it an epidemic, according to 24/7 Wall St. Outsiders traveling in probably didn’t hear about the high homicide rate in this city because Metro Police spokeswoman Kristin Mumford told Nashville News4 that most of these homicides were between people who knew each other and were engaged in “risky behavior.”

13. Cleveland, Ohio

For the past several years, Cleveland has been considered one of the most dangerous cities in the U.S. based on national crime rankings. Cleveland is the second largest city in Ohio which means it also has a large population. Unfortunately, a good chunk of this population lives in poverty and is unemployed. The city has some of the highest rates of unemployment in the country. In 2017 the unemployment rate sat at 7.4-percent and the poverty rate was 36-percent.

Not surprisingly, these numbers contribute to the higher violent crime rates. In 2017, Cleveland experienced 107 homicides and nearly 6,000 violent crimes were reported. The violent crime rate was calculated to be 69.2 violent crimes per 10,000 residents or 1,557 per 100,000 residents. While it’s still considered to be a great city to visit (I mean, it is the home of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame), but travellers should just be wary of the high crime rate in this city when traveling here in 2019, and practice common sense.

12. Detroit, Michigan

It might not be too surprising to see this city on the list. Detroit has a reputation for being a bit of an urban graveyard with thousands of empty buildings, a massive population decline, and a high poverty rate. In 2017 the city’s poverty rate sat at a whopping 39-percent with an unemployment rate of 9.3-percent. Not surprisingly, these traits all contribute to a high crime rate.

A closer look at Detroit’s violent crime rate in 2017 showed that there were 2,057 per 100,000 residents and 267 homicides.

11. Chicago, Illinois

Chicago has a notorious reputation when it comes to crime, but it’s actually not as bad as some smaller cities on this list like New Orleans, Newark, and Detroit. Chicago is the third largest city in the country and while it does have a higher murder rate than the two larger cities, Los Angeles and New York City, it’s still not the most dangerous city in the country. The latest data from 2017 shows that the murder rate in Chicago was 24 per 100,000 residents. That same year 650 people were murdered in this city, down from 771 in 2016, which isn’t hard considering it was the deadliest year the city had seen in decades.

Despite the higher risk of danger in this city, it doesn’t seem to deter tourists at all. In 2017 it was the second most visited city in the United States with 55 million visitors, right behind New York City which had 65 million visitors.

10. Anchorage, Alaska

Tourism is actually a big part of Alaska’s economy, so it does get a lot of visitors throughout the year, but it also has a pretty high crime rate. This is mainly due to the fact that it is such a large state. It is the largest state, the 3rd least populous and the most sparsely populated state in America. This probably plays a big role in why Alaska has higher crime rates because the police are unable to get to a crime scene as quickly as they would in a more densely populated city. This also affects their ability to solve a lot of crimes. In 2017, Anchorage had 57.1 violent crimes per 10,000 residents.

Road Snacks writes that Anchorage ranked as the 16th most dangerous city in terms of violent crimes in 2017 with 1,203 per 100,000 residents and the 25th most dangerous for property crimes with a rate of 5,415 per 100,000 residents. 24/7 Wall St. writes that many experts blame drug and gang violence for these high crime rates and that more drug addiction and mental health treatment centers are needed in the city.

9. Baltimore, Maryland

Baltimore is no joke when it comes to violent crime. In fact, there’s a reason HBO chose Baltimore, Maryland as the set for the American crime drama series The Wire. This show was supposed to depict a fictionalized version of the real crime issues in this city. So what are the real crime issues in Baltimore? Well for starters, this city has the third highest rate of violent crimes per 100,000 people. In 2017 there were 8,879 robberies reported which means the rate per 100,000 is 959 or 2,027 to 100,000 residents. To give a little perspective, this is nearly 10 times higher than the national robbery rate and the highest in any other major U.S. city. There were also 342 homicides in 2017 and a poverty rate of 23.1-percent. On a smaller scale, Business Insider found that Baltimore had 98.6 violent crimes per 10,000 residents in 2017.

USA Today reiterates this with a look at the violent crime rate per 100,000 residents which is 2,027. It also lists 2017 as having 342 homicides – that is pretty darn close to one every single day. This city also held a poverty rate of 23.1-percent and an unemployment rate of 6.1-percent.

Jon Bilous / Shutterstock.com

8. Pueblo, Colorado

When we think of Colorado we usually think of Rocky Mountains and a ski vacation getaway, but that’s not what Pueblo is known for. This city saw 48.9 violent crimes per 10,000 residents in 2017. What’s impressive is that this city is actually the smallest city on this list, but yet it still ranks pretty high up. It only just clocks over 100,000 people. While it may be smaller than some of the other cities on this list, it ranks in the eight spot for worst property crime rate with the majority of them being burglaries. Road Snacks reports there being 1,052 violent crimes per 100,000 people and 6,167 property crimes per 100,000 people.

mese.berg / Shutterstock.com

7. Chattanooga, Tennessee

Tennessee is a popular tourist destination because of Nashville, also known as ‘Music City,’ which also landed on this list. In addition to Nashville, the lesser known city of Chattanooga is another dangerous city to visit. It has the same kind of feel as Memphis and Nashville, but just not as touristy, and for good reason. It is one of the worst cities in America for property crime. It lands in the number 10 spot for property crime with 5,985 per 100,000 residents and is the 23rd most dangerous for violent crimes with 1,065 per 100,000 residents.

In 2017, there were 31 homicides. In most American cities the number of crime goes down each year, but for Chattanooga, the number of homicides in 2017 was at a record high. Local police said the major thing that did go down in 2017 was gang violence, writes 24/7 Wall St. In 2016 there were 132 shooting incidents, most of which were a result of a bloody gang war. While gang violence in this city is on the decline, the violent crime rate is on the rise. It was 1,023 per 100,000 in 2016, and in 2017 it rose to 1,066 per 100,000.

6. Oakland, California

Despite the high crime rates in this city, it’s actually become a desirable place to live and that’s because it’s so much cheaper than San Fransisco. Even though Oakland’s property prices are cheaper, there may be a price for safety. San Francisco ranks over 30 spots higher on the list of safe cities over Oakland. Now it’s not all doom and gloom for this city. To be fair their crime rates have actually been improving the past few years. It wasn’t that long ago that Oakland was known for having high rates of homicides, rapes, and aggravated assaults. According to 24.7 Wall St., the crime in this area skyrocketed after the recession, then went down, only to go back up again in 2012. Luckily it’s now on the decline again, but it’s still higher than most would like.

According to Road Snacks, “Oakland has the 10th highest violent crime rank in the country and the fifteenth highest property crime rate.” Yikes! In 2017 the violent crime rate was 1,299 per 100,000 residents and 69 homicides. The city had an unemployment rate of 4.2-percent and a poverty rate of 20-percent.

5. Albuquerque, New Mexico

For those who are surprised to see Albuquerque on this list, it’s more due to property crimes than violent crimes, but don’t be fooled by that. This is still one of the most dangerous cities in America. In 2016, Albuquerque had one of the worst crime rates in the country with 1,112 reported incidents of rape, assault, homicide, and robbery per 100,000 residents. Unfortuantely, 2017 didn’t fair much better for this city. In fact, the rates rose by a whopping 23-percent. In 2017 it became the 11th most dangerous city in America with 1,369 violent crimes per 100,000 residents, 70 of these incidents were homicides.

The poverty rate in Albuquerque is 18.9-percent with an unemployment rate of 5.5-percent. What’s even worse than being ranked as the 11th most violent city in the country? It’s ranked as the third most dangerous city for property crimes with 7, 365 per 100,000 residents in 2017. Many of these property crimes are a result of robberies. In 2016 the city reported 2,000 robberies which then rose to 2,930 in 2017.

 

4. Springfield, Missouri

As the first Springfield in America, this city made history. It’s making history once again, but this time as one of the most dangerous cities in the U.S. Business Insider looked at FBI data from 2017 and found that Springfield had 40.3 violent crimes per 10,000 residents. According to 24/7 Wall St., this number is on the rise. The homicide rate nearly doubled between 2016 and 2017 going from 4.8 to 8.3 per 100,000. The same source writes, “Murder and non-negligent manslaughter represent a relatively small share of overall violent crime, and Springfield’s violent crime rate remained effectively unchanged between 2016 and 2017.”

Road Snacks lists it as the number one most dangerous city in terms of property crimes with 8,853 per 100,000 people and the 12th most dangerous for violent crimes with 1,338 per 100,000 residents. There were 14 homicides in 2017, a poverty rate of 25.9-percent and an unemployment rate of 3.2-percent. Yet another reason to be wary of traveling to this city in 2019, this city sadly has the highest rate of reported incidents of rape in the country with an average of 209 per 100,000 residents. To give some perspective on this, the national average is 42 per 100,000.

3. Little Rock, Arkansas

Little Rock’s crime rate ain’t so little! This city is the capital of Arkansas and the largest city in the state. Not only did it have the highest crime rate in the state, but is also one of the highest in the country! Little Rock had 87.4 violent crimes per 10,000 residents, says Business Insider and according to Road Snacks, it ranks in the top 10 in the country for both property and violent crimes per capita. The same source lists it as the sixth most dangerous in terms of violent crimes with 1,633 per 100,000 people and the fifth most dangerous in terms of property crimes with 6,932 per 100,000 people.

There were 55 homicides in this city in 2017, a poverty rate of 18.5-percent, and an employment rate of 3.3-percent, according to USA Today. The rate of criminal offenses in 2017 rose 1.1-percent from 2016, and 24/7 Wall St. says the police blame it on rival gang activity.

2. Memphis, Tennessee

Violence and crime probably isn’t the first thing that comes to mind when thinking about Memphis, Tennessee. It’s more commonly known for it’s blues on Beale Street, being the home of Elvis, and of course, the site of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. But according to crime data from 2017, it’s currently one of the most dangerous cities in America with one of the highest violent crime rates in the country. In fact, Road Snacks lists it as being the third highest in America.

According to 24/7 Wall St., there were 653,000 violent crimes and 181 homicides committed in this city in 2017 which gives residents about a one in 50 chance at being a victim. We’re guessing the high rate of poverty has something to do with these statistics because Memphis has a poverty rate of about 27.6-percent which is much higher than the national 15.1-percent.

 

Natalia Bratslavsky / Shutterstock.com

1. St. Louis, Missouri

St. Louis is typically known for it’s range of barbecue restaurants and blues music, but it’s also got another trick up it’s sleeve…one that probably isn’t advertised as much to tourists. It lands in the number one spot on several different lists as being the most dangerous city in America. Since this city ranks as the most dangerous city in America, at least based on crime data from 2017, we also consider it to be the most dangerous U.S. city to travel to in 2019.

Business Insider writes that St. Louis, Missouri had 91.5 violent crimes per 10,000 people in 2017. There were 205 homicides reported in St. Louis that same year which isn’t actually the highest number for a U.S. city in 2017, but once it’s adjusted to it’s population, it ends up being the highest murder rate in the country. According to 24/7 Wall St., St. Louis has a murder rate of 67 per 100,000 people which is extremely high, especially when it’s compared to the national average of 5 per 100,000. On top of all the violent crimes, the murder count for St. Louis in 2017 was 6,461 or 2,082 per 100,000 residents. This is the highest violent crime rate of any major U.S. city.

Wondering what has changed in 2020? Check out our updated list of the most dangerous cities in the US for 2020.

Amazing Destination Bakeries Worth Traveling For

Perhaps paradoxically, at the same time North Americans have been waging war on carbs and gluten-laden treats, there has also been a growing infatuation with bakeries of all stripes. Of course, not all bakeries are created equal and very few of them are worth traveling far from home for. From traditional European shops to all-American classics, here are 8 world-class bakeries that definitely justify the purchase of the plane ticket, all on their own.

8. Konditori Fågelsången (Uppsala)

A konditori is a Swedish café and meeting spot that usually serves pastries, in line with the Swedish tradition of fika (a social coffee break). The Konditori Fågelsången in Uppsala, while maybe not as trendy as some of the cafes in Stockholm, was established in 1954 and still bakes their pastries, cakes and other sweets in-house. While it isn’t headed by a world-renowned pastry chef or perhaps as innovative as some of the other bakeries mentioned here, Konditori Fågelsången makes traditional treats and makes them well. You’re not going to find a better spot for Swedish treats like kladdkaka or prinsesstårta. If you do find yourself here, a traditional Swedish cinnamon roll (kanelbulle) is always a safe choice. A personal favorite is the wienerbröd, similar to American-style Danishes, but infinitely better.

7. Le Panier (Seattle)

Opened in 1983, this Pike Place establishment is committed to making Normandy-style pastries; the owners still make regular trips to France to ensure they’re on the up-and-up with French baking. Given that Seattle’s a bit closer for West Coasters than France (or even Montreal), visiting Le Panier is the next best solution. Try the tarte aux abricots, a fruit tart with almond pastry cream and sour apricots, or one of the bakery’s own creations, like the Feuilletes: puff pastry with savory fillings like spinach and mushrooms. Macarons, eclairs and friands round out the menu. Le Panier offers seasonal variation on some of their staples too, like their pumpkin macaron, the apple friand and the hazelnut éclair. If you’re in Seattle, skip Starbucks and head over to Le Panier instead.

6. Elizabethan Desserts

Whoopie pies, cupcakes and homemade Twinkies are features on the menu of classic, 1950s-style American treats available at Elizabethan Desserts in El Camino Real, California. The strawberry rhubarb pie is made with a shortbread cookie crust and the peanut butter in the chocolate peanut butter praline crunch cake is made from scratch. Vintage cookie jars and a mint-and-white palette add to the old-timey feel. Consensus is that the must-try entry is the Louis Gooey Butter Cake Bar; Elizabethan Desserts adds a fruit topping to their version and the classic yellow cake batter that serves as the foundation of the dessert is mixed with cream cheese to create a decadent delight for your tastebuds. The creamy vanilla custard filling rounds out the flavor experience.

5. Bäckerei Balzer (Berlin)

Germans are noted for their rich pastries and desserts: Black Forest cake and what we call Danishes (known as “Vienna bread,” after the capital of Austria, in some parts of Europe), as well as German chocolate cakes and bundts are all part of the average North American’s catalogue of sweet treats. Many of these treats emigrated to North America in centuries past, but if you want to taste the authentic, you need to get to Germany. The Bäckeri Balzer in Berlin was established in the 1920s and continues to make traditional German treats to this very day, even as other establishments have given way to trendy cafes and shops. The Bäckerie’s streuselschnecken are famous amongst locals, and you’ll have to arrive early if you want a chance at sampling one; they sell out fast. Apple fritters, bread rolls and buttercake round out the bakery’s offerings.

4. Muddy’s Bake Shop (Memphis)

Muddy’s Bake Shop in East Memphis, Tennessee, has ended up on a few best-of lists, and one trip to the bakery itself makes it clear why. Muddy’s is a homey sort of establishment that hands out mismatched coffee mugs to customers perched on vintage furniture. Make no mistake, though: the bakery does it while serving up serious Southern treats, including decadent cupcakes, pies and toffee bars. The Prozac cake, which is 2 layers of devil’s food cake smothered with smooth chocolate buttercream, and the Frankly Scarlett cupcakes, which are red velvet with cream cheese frosting, are 2 of the best items on the menu. Other treats include banana pudding, butter cookies and the Nancy’s Boy pie, a chess pie with coconut. You can’t miss the Shady Wake pie, a classic pecan pie.

3. Bakery Lorraine (San Antonio)

Texas may not be high on your hit list for places with great bakeries, but it should be: Bakery Lorraine is there and it would be a darn shame to miss a bake shop this good. Open since 2012, the bakery has been hailed as one of the best new bakeries in the whole of the U.S., and the shop had already outgrown its original location by 2013. Owners Anne Ng and Jeremy Mandrell take a novel approach to both French and American pastries, ranging from Pop-Tarts to kouign-amann. Most popular are their colorful macarons, which come in a plethora of refined flavors, including dark chocolate lavender, chamomile vanilla, earl grey and pumpkin spice. The menu is ever-changing, based on seasonal ingredients and locally sourced products. If you have a chance, try the fig chevre tarts, which are filled with fig jam and vanilla-flavored goat cheese.

2. Maison Christian Faure (Montreal)

If you want French-style baking without traveling all the way to Paris, a trip to Montreal is on your itinerary. The city has probably more than its fair share of bakeries serving up traditional French treats and New World-twists, like the Montreal-style bagel, but Maison Christian Faure is a standout in a place full of exceptional establishments. Chef Faure maintains his own pastry school in the French tradition, which should give you an inkling about the quality of the pastries available in the shop. Everything is accented by a focus on locally sourced ingredients and seasonal Quebec produce. Enjoy an éclair or a traditional mille-feuille without stepping off the North American landmass. The absolute best menu item is Paris Brest with praline cream. Not feeling something sweet? The shop also has a snack menu and a deli.

1. Dominique Ansel Bakery (New York)

Dominique Ansel, creator of the international sensation known as the cronut, is something of a celebrity chef in the Big Apple, and for good reason. His Soho bakery, located at 189 Spring Street in Manhattan, has a wide variety of delicious goodies up for grabs, including mini-meringues, large cakes, macarons and other gifts. The chef creates a signature item every year; past inventions have included the Frozen S’more and the Cookie Shot. His imagination has earned him the title “Willy Wonka of NYC” and his bakery, opened in 2011, has been named the best bakery in the city by various magazines and newspapers. If you’re in the Big Apple, you need to stop by; in fact, you can probably justify traveling to NYC based on a visit to the now-iconic shop alone.

Blues Highway Itinerary: 10 Best Spots for a Music History Road Trip

If you’ve had enough scenic tours of mountains and fresh air, head out onto the iconic Blues Highway, the famous Route 61 that leads to Nashville, Memphis, and finally to New Orleans, with the sweet and passionate tunes of Soul, R&B, and Jazz in the air. Drive out into the sunset, feel the wind on your face, and follow the same highway that Otis Redding, Muddy Waters and other hopefuls took on their way out of bleak areas of Mississippi and Georgia. With the open road in front of you, pay homage to the same spots that inspired the beloved classics and paved the way for Elvis and the Beatles.

10. Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum – Nashville, Tennessee

Starting out in Nashville, get into the mood of Music City at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum, the headquarters for preserving and collecting artifacts that capture the history and traditions of American country music. At the main exhibit, “Sing Me Back Home: A Journey Through Country Music”, get ready to take in the rich saga of music history that put Nashville on the map. With recorded sound, vintage film footage, and old photographs, visitors can trace the origins of country music and how it had a lasting influence on American culture. After touring the grounds, hop on a vintage tour bus to Music Row and the cherished RCA Studio B, Nashville’s oldest surviving studio where legends like Dolly Parton and Elvis made music history.

Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

9. Grand Ole Opry – Nashville, Tennessee

The Grand Ole Opry is a must-see on your Nashville stop. For 90 years and still going strong, the weekly music venue is known for hosting legends that made country music famous. Dolly Parton, Patsy Cline, Hank Williams, and many others got their start at the Opry with legendary performances. Today, you’ll find a mix of newcomers and stars playing their best songs, that way fans can get a sample of several musicians in one concert. The magic started in 1925 when fiddle player Uncle Jimmy Thompson performed a new show called “The WSM Barn Dance,” which later evolved into a live concert known as the Grand Ole Opry. DeFord Bailey, affectionately known as the Harmonica Wizard, was also a regular performer. Over the years, the famous venue has launched countless music careers. Set against the iconic backdrop of Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium, it is truly an American cultural landmark.

aceshot1 / Shutterstock.com
aceshot1 / Shutterstock.com

8. The District – Nashville, Tennessee

It’s not just the country music that makes Nashville famous but the rock, jazz, and bluegrass playing at venues in the District, a refurbished area of warehouse-style saloons and bars. Stroll down second avenue with the weeknight party parade and stop by for some authentic bluegrass at Station Inn across the street from the Grand Ole Opry. Then take the party to Tootsie’s Orchid Lounge to get your honky tonky on at the iconic country music saloon. But the music tour isn’t over until you stop at BB King’s Blues Club, the world famous hotspot for live blues and Southern comfort food. And don’t forget to try the fried green tomatoes and other down home delicacies at the Opry Backstage Grill on Music Valley Drive.

Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com
Sean Pavone / Shutterstock.com

7. The Stax Museum of American Soul Music – Memphis, Tennessee

After getting your fill of classic country music in Nashville, head to Memphis and follow the origins of Blues. First stop is The Stax Museum of American Soul Music on East McLemore Ave, which is named after the record label that produced talents like Otis Redding, Isaac Hayes, and Wilson Pickett. The Stax sound is passionate and hopeful, giving a voice to the new wave of optimism coming from the Mississippi Delta, a sound as strongly rooted as the old Cyprus trees. In the late 50s and early 60s, something big was happening in music, so epic and transformative that it has its own cherished place in the history of music. In 1960, Stax Records, often considered the birthplace of soul, moved to the old Capitol Theatre and two years later, Otis Redding was discovered and became their biggest star.

Pierre-Jean Durieu / Shutterstock.com
Pierre-Jean Durieu / Shutterstock.com

6. Wild Bill’s – Memphis, Tennessee

After getting an education in blues history at Stax Museum, stop in for a blues jam at Wild Bill’s, a classic juke joint a few miles north of the tourist area of Beale Street. Locals always say there are two reasons to go—when you’re feeling good and when you’re feeling bad. Whatever your mood, the blues will set you free, if you let it. Locals and aficionados swear by it, often joking that it’s cheaper than therapy. Located in Midtown Memphis, Wild Bill’s is a welcome alternative to the tourist clubs downtown and a more authentic blues, soul, and rock sound. From old bands to aspiring indie groups, Wild Bill’s is the spot where musicians sing their hearts out and when back in the day blues evolved into rock ‘n’ roll and soul. The former gas station is like stepping back in time, even hosting the original trumpet player from Otis Redding’s band.

Photo by: Wild Bill's Memphis
Photo by: Wild Bill’s Memphis

5. Rendezvous – Memphis, Tennessee

Memphis might be world famous because of its blues heritage and Elvis, but it also some of the best barbeque this side of the Delta. With over 100 barbecue joints in the city, the competition is fierce and Rendezvous downtown is no exception with its famous dry ribs. The secret is in the charcoal, which was Charles Vergo’s special cooking method, and of course, the sauce. It is considered by many to be the best barbecue in the Delta. Just ask the several 1,000 people that line up outside on a Saturday to sink their teeth into a slab of ribs, a classic Memphis favorite. The joint is still in the family, with Charlie’s kids running the place. It might be all about the ribs, but you can still order the same ham and cheese sandwiches that Charlie cooked up when he started out in 1948. Their sauces are top secret, but you can take a bottle home for some serious backyard grilling sessions.

Photo by: Charlie Vergos Rendezvous
Photo by: Charlie Vergos Rendezvous

4. Madison Hotel – Memphis, Tennessee

Built in 1905, the 14-story former Tennessee Trust building is one of the oldest skyscrapers in the Delta. Standing out with its ornate classical detailing, the Madison Hotel still regains its former glory with the original façade. After years of neglect, the Unison Hotel Company rescued the deteriorating structure in 2002 and converted the interior into an ultra-modern, sleek boutique hotel with 110 rooms. After long hours in the car, treat yourself to luxuries fit for royalty like Egyptian cotton sheets, an award-winning restaurant, and an enchanting evening on the Twilight Sky Terrace overlooking downtown. It might have a posh, European flair, but Madison Hotel still has a warm, Southern charm. Located on Madison Avenue, the hotel is near the historic Beale Street filled with blues clubs, restaurants, and recording studios.

Photo by: Madison Hotel
Photo by: Madison Hotel

3. Gateway to the Blues Museum -Tunica, Mississippi

A good place to start a Mississippi blues tour is Gateway to the Blues Museum in Tunica, a historical wonderland filled with stories of the very origins of blues that had a lasting influence on American music, especially soul, R&B, and rock n roll. It all started in the fields of the Delta, a place of pain and hope, and blues was just the thing to give a voice to the heartache and suffering of a dark time in US history. You’ll also get a chance to channel your inner rock star with interactive exhibits that teach the blues basics and even lets you record a song in the onsite recording studio. Music history buffs will revel in the guitar display with over 20 guitars of all kinds that were played by the legends themselves. Try out the lap steel guitar or diddley bow and play your heart out.

Photo by: Tunica Travel
Photo by: Tunica Travel

2. Ground Zero Blues Club – Clarksdale, Mississippi

For blues fans and music historians, Clarksdale, Mississippi is considered the “Ground Zero” for blues around the world. Established in 2001, the venue was opened to celebrate the area’s rich blues heritage with roots as strong  and ancient as the Delta. With the help of Morgan Freeman and locals Bill Luckett and Howard Stovall, the blues club has been a hotspot for an authentic blues experience. Although big acts come through from time to time, most musicians come from the Delta and follow in the traditions of legends like John Lee Hooker and Muddy Waters. Located on Blues Alley in the heart of historic Clarksdale, the world’s most beloved musicians play Wednesday through Saturday, keeping the blues tradition alive and well. Ground Zero Blues Club is also a good spot to try some Southern comfort food like crispy catfish and slow-cooked Mississippi barbeque.

Ground Zero Blues Club
Photo by: Ground Zero Blues Club

1. The French Quarter – New Orleans, Louisiana

As people fled the dismal areas from Georgia to Mississippi during the Great Depression, they brought with them the bittersweet blues, a new kind of sound that brought a voice to a newfound passion and hope. Many stopped in New Orleans, Louisiana, a meeting place for musicians, artists, and writers. Among them were the world’s best blues musicians, the cherished legends who led the way for jazz and now take a prominent place in the evolution of American music. With its slightly leaning buildings, old streets, and original cafes and bars, the charm of New Orleans is still going strong. Holding onto its French and Spanish immigrant roots, the historic French Quarter is still the stomping grounds for the best musicians in the world and on any given day an impromptu brass band might joyfully stop traffic. The best time to go is during festival season, which starts in April.

IrinaK / Shutterstock.com
IrinaK / Shutterstock.com

The 8 Best States to Experience American BBQ

In the world of barbecue things get personal. Tempers run high, differences in regions vary greatly and everyone believes they truly produce the best in barbecue. When we talk barbecue we are not talking about grilling a couple of steaks. Barbecue here means mastering the technique of cooking meat for long periods of time at low temperatures with smoke from a wood fire. Competitions are held throughout the nation, barbecue joints are constantly being judged and this growing debate shows no signs of slowing down. There is one thing for sure though; these eight states certainly know how to produce exceptional American barbecue.

8. Florida

You may not think that Florida would be the place to experience some of the best American barbecue, but they are home to some amazing old-fashioned down-home slow cooking barbecue. In fact not one, but three Florida barbecue joints made it onto the top 10 list of the best barbecue restaurants in the United States put out by TripAdvisor. Classics such as ribs and pulled pork sandwiches are available at numerous joints around the state and the constant nice weather allows for this style of cooking to hang around all year. If you thought that Florida wasn’t considered to be “The South” in terms of cooking, think again.

Beach BBQ

7. South Carolina

No one does sauces quite like South Carolina and no one will dare argue with the locals that there barbecue isn’t one of the best in the nation. Cities such as Columbia, Charleston and Greenville have numerous restaurants serving up the classics with the infamous sauces. For it is the sauces that make the barbecue according to locals and most of all, the mustard-style sauce. South Carolina even has a BBQ Trail Map which gives visitors the lowdown on all the barbecue joints across the state, including where to find them, how to get there and which sauces they use. Hailed as the birthplace of barbecue, South Carolina knows how to do it right.

BBQ Ribs

6. New York

Southerners may turn up their nose at this suggestion but the truth is New Yorkers have finally figured out the art of the barbecue and are making waves all over the nation competing with the best of the best. Restaurant owners have invested in high quality proper wood-fueled smokers, hired the best chefs and are producing many classics such as pulled pork, boneless beef ribs and apple cured chicken. New York is currently home to at least eight or 10 amazing barbecue spots, each competing with one another to be on top. Prepare yourself for down-home dishes, fall off the bone meat and innovative sides that are taking barbecue to a new level, New York style.

New Orleans Restaurants 13

5. Georgia

Georgia can certainly claim that it is one of the best states to experience American barbecue seeing as the restaurant that was named number one in the top 10 list of the best barbecue restaurants in the United States put out by TripAdvisor was from here. Georgia barbecues are an eclectic mix of ingredients and styles drawn from all over the American South resulting in some delicious eats. Whether it is pit-smoked, oven-smoked or on the grill, the one thing you can expect from a Georgia barbecue is that the meat is going to be slow cooked. This state also specializes in the famous Brunswick stew, a classic that involves taking the various smoked meats and sauces and combining them with butter beans, tomatoes and corn, among other things.

Steak on the grill

4. North Carolina

There are thousands of barbecue joints in North Carolina, in fact the city of Lexington has self-proclaimed itself to be the barbecue capital of the world. Where you go in this state depends on what type of barbecue you will experience as they do things differently in the East and West. Eastern NC uses the whole hog with a tangy vinegar sauce while the Western part of the state only uses the meat from above the shoulder and the sauce is more tomato based. Like their Southerly neighbors; this state has its own Historic Barbecue Trail, a route that links about 25 joints and places across the state which changes annually.

Texas BBQ (2)

3. Missouri

The place to visit in Missouri is Kansas City as they have spent years building their culinary reputation by slowly and patiently smoking meat, and doing it excellently. The city of Kansas itself is home to over 100 barbecue joints and many highly regarded barbecue cooking contests. Each barbecue spot has its own specialty and one could spend a lifetime sampling the different varieties throughout the state. This state is unique in that it doesn’t necessarily just consider pork to be barbecue, the joints here use a variety of meats. If you ever wanted to witness the who’s who of barbecue, head to Missouri where the The American Royal World Series of Barbecue takes place and is considered the largest barbecue contest in the world.

Photo by: Visit Missouri
Photo by: Visit Missouri

2. Tennessee

Memphis is the city to be in if you are looking for true American BBQ in this state. Pork ribs are the most iconic Memphis specialty, and the most famous ribs here are served dry. Memphis sauce tends to be vinegar based, with a sweet flavor of tomato to it and some joints love to add a little spice. But this state doesn’t just stop at ribs, it excels at all forms of pork. Beef is pretty much non existent except once a year when brisket and beef ribs hit the grill at the World Kosher Barbecue Championship. Outside of the city barbecue joints are known for their wood-smoked whole hog, sometimes taking as long as 20 hours to smoke it before pulling, chopping and slicing it up.

BBQ

1. Texas

Few people will disagree that the state of Texas is the best place to experience real American barbecue. Texas is unique in that is has different styles of barbecue throughout the state. In central Texas the most popular barbecue is brisket, sausage and pork ribs that are served with salt and pepper and smoked over oak coals; a method many Southerners say is not ‘true’ barbecue. East Texas barbecue on the other hand is a direct descendant of the South’s barbecue, brought to the region by slaves who arrived to farm cotton in the 1800s. This traditional method is smoking pork shoulder, sausage, brisket, and pork ribs. Austin, Houston, Dallas; all these cities offer so many different barbecue joints it can be hard to choose where to start.

Southern BBQ

10 Things To See And Do In Memphis

Are you stuck inside your hometown with the Memphis blues again?  Saddle up your car, hire a sitter for your houseplants, pack up the family and ride off into the sunset towards the chosen land of Memphis, Tennessee.  Presumably, if you’re interested in visiting Memphis you’re probably a music fan or you are at least interested in the art form’s history. Memphis is a musical Mecca (everyone knows Elvis) and one of the original birthplaces of Soul music as well as the Blues. This holy land has a lot to offer for any “soul searching” musical pilgrims with sacred musical sites abounding.  While Memphis boasts a plethora of musically oriented sites, the city also provides a variety of attractions and experiences for those who are not so interested in music history.  So prepare yourselves, EscapeHere has a list of the Top Ten things to do and see in Memphis, Tennessee.

10. The Sun Studio

The Sun Studio is one of the most musically and historically rich sites in the entirety of The Unites States. It is certainly a legendary site in terms of music history, having been the place where Elvis Presley recorded his very first song. It also served as an initial foundation for recordings by many Rock n’ Roll legends such as Johnny Cash, Roy Orbison, Jerry Lee Lewis and a multitude of other musicians. The studio has also been used by contemporary musicians such as U2, John Mellencamp and Def Leppard as a recording space. Sun Studio is the home base for the equally distinguished record label, Sun Records and was also used as a setting in many films, including “Walk the Line,” “Great Balls of Fire” and “Mystery Train.”

Due to its rich history and importance to the development of American music, the Sun Studio is also a National Historic Landmark, and is protected from demolition by the United States Government.  As an attraction, it includes a high quality gift shop, complete with a coffee house and soda fountain as well as an upstairs museum where any visitor will be directed and informed of Sun Studios’ history by extremely knowledgeable tour guides. The tours offer information for the most die-hard of music fans but they also provide information for the casual visitor.

Mixer

9. National Civil Rights Museum – Lorraine Motel

The Lorraine Motel was the site of Martin Luther King Junior’s assassination, and though some might have had it demolished or allowed its tainted history to dictate its future, the city of Memphis has turned the motel into an incredible homage to the civil rights movement that King labored so diligently to progress. The National Civil Rights Museum underwent a 27.5 million dollar renovation in 2012 and in order to properly exhibit the entire history of civil rights, the museum encompasses not just the Lorraine Motel, but several surrounding buildings as well.

Beginning with the 1700’s, the museum offers an interactive tour that intricately demonstrates the entirety of American Civil Rights. It contains many exhibits and multimedia presentations covering the past, present and future of the civil rights movement. Among the most impressive exhibits that the museum offers is a replica Montgomery, Alabama bus that Rosa Parks would have rode on the day of her protests -which visitors are free to explore.  It also contains The Lorraine Motel’s room 306, the room in which King stayed on the day of his assassination.  Prices range from around ten dollars to thirteen dollars, depending on the visitors’ age, but an experience such as this is worth every penny.

American Spirit / Shutterstock.com
American Spirit / Shutterstock.com

8. The Stax Museum of American Soul Music

This site is for the real “soul searchers” out there. Yes, that’s the second time the same pun has been used in one article. The Stax Museum of American Soul Music is another must-see attraction for music fans and non-music fans alike. An exact replica of the former Stax Records recording studio, it resides at the very address where Stax Records once operated and boasts a gargantuan 17,000 square foot museum full of vintage musical instruments, mementos and exhibits. These exhibits concern the history of soul music and also emphasize the various influential artists who had, at one time or another, signed with Stax Records.

Among the many exhibits are those dedicated to past and present Stax Records artists Isaac Hayes, Otis Redding and Albert King, among many others. Though the museum focuses on Stax Records artists, it also boasts a massive video footage collection of various non-Stax artists such as James Brown, Tina Turner, The Jackson Five, Stevie Wonder and other high-profile soul artists.   Some of The Stax Museum’s most impressive artifacts include a genuine, century-old Mississippi Delta Church, the authentic Soul Train dance floor and Isaac Hayes refurbished Cadillac Eldorado. The museum also hosts a bounty of ever-changing exhibits dedicated to the history and legacy of soul music.

Stax Museum Memphis
Photo by: Stax Museum of American Soul Music

7. Graceland Mansion

If you travel to Memphis, Tennessee then you must visit Graceland. Whether you are a fan of music or merely a sightseer, Elvis Presley’s impact upon the world is far reaching. He not only changed the face of music, but he also impacted American and global culture. This detail is impossible to ignore and there is no better way to show appreciation for or understand his legacy than by visiting Elvis Presley’s former home.

Graceland is the second most visited house in America, only being beaten out by The White House. Now a gallery, the Graceland Mansion and grounds contain a number of museums dedicated to the King of Rock n’ Roll with informative tours and exhibits, as well as virtual iPad tours containing added footage and photos. Visitors can tour Elvis’ “Jungle Room,” view his car, jet and record collections and also pay homage to The King by visiting his grave. There are multiple tours and museums, and their rates vary in price and duration. However, most visitors agree that Graceland is one of, if not the most, important sites in all of Memphis, Tennessee.  The site also offers dining services, various gift shops and is located directly across the street from the Elvis-themed “Heartbreak Hotel.”

American Spirit / Shutterstock.com
American Spirit / Shutterstock.com

6. Beale Street

Ask anyone who has been to Memphis and they will tell you to visit Beale Street. Much like Bourbon Street in New Orleans or 6th Street in Austin, Beale Street is known as the penultimate experience for anyone looking to partake in Memphis’ vibrant and unique culture. This street is the place where Memphis Soul began and continues to this day. Its stages housed shows from soul masters B.B. King, Louis Armstrong and Muddy Waters, among a plethora of others. It was so integral to the evolution of blues and soul music that in 1952 an act of Congress officially declared Beale Street as “Home of The Blues.”

If you are looking for a relaxed shopping and dining experience, it is best to visit Beale Street during the day, because at night, it becomes a non-stop party. From souvenirs to high-end clothing to world-renowned barbeque, Beale Street offers a wide variety of shopping and dining opportunities. However, if you are looking for a nightlife experience that you won’t soon forget, head to Beale Street around sundown and you will find yourself in the midst of one of America’s most unique and exciting assortments of clubs, bars and live music shows.

Natalia Bratslavsky / Shutterstock.com
Natalia Bratslavsky / Shutterstock.com

5. Memphis Rock n’ Soul Museum

The Memphis Rock n’ Soul Museum is a building dedicated to the history and legacy of Memphis musicians who pioneered and furthered the evolution of “the Memphis sound.” The museum was created through the combined efforts of The National Museum of American History and the Smithsonian Institute. Among its many displays, the museum hosts The Smithsonian’s “Rock n’ Roll: Social Crossroads” exhibit. The museum chronicles the evolution of rock and roll music as well as soul, beginning in the 1920’s and gradually moving into the current era of music.

The museum also provides a collection of over 100 songs recorded in the greater Memphis area during the 1930’s and moving into the 1970’s. It also boasts an informative catalog of information containing over 300 minutes of material concerning the musicians, labels and pioneers who have operated in Memphis throughout its history. It is not the largest museum in Memphis and it is more directly oriented towards visitors who are interested in the history and evolution of Memphis music. However, it is very possibly the most informative museum in the city and visitors will leave with an enhanced understanding of music history and Memphis music’s effect upon American music and culture.

JStone / Shutterstock.com
JStone / Shutterstock.com

4. The Orpheum Theatre

The Orpheum Theatre is an auditorium that seats 2,400 people and is one of the few remaining “movie palaces” still in existence. The Theatre was originally built in 1890 as an opera house and was known as The Grand. However, it burned to the ground and was rebuilt in 1928 during the peak of the movie palace boom. It was then renovated in 1982 and reopened in 1984 as a much more luxurious and elegant building. The Orpheum Theater is a non-profit organization managed by The Memphis Development Foundation, and it is home to the Memphis Ballet and the Memphis Opera. However, it also hosts shows and events ranging from films and concerts to Broadway plays. On average, The Orpheum Theatre annually hosts more Broadway shows than any other theatre in the country.

The Orpheum is less of a tourist attraction than it is a legitimate venue and staple of Memphis culture. Its grand appearance and lavish decor provide every attendee with a genuine, vintage experience in a masterfully maintained theatre. Prices range depending on the show but if you find yourself in Memphis, The Orpheum is a fantastic place to begin a night out on the town.

Photo by: Orpheum Theatre
Photo by: Orpheum Theatre

3. The Memphis Zoo

The Memphis Zoo is a family friendly attraction and houses a giant collection of animals. It has undergone over 70 million dollars worth of renovations since the early 1990’s and in 2008 it was even ranked the #1 zoo in America based on visitors’ votes on tripadvisor.com. Overall, the zoo has over 3,500 different animals, and though its animal collection is large, the zoo itself is relatively small. So, it is a pleasant walk for any visitor, whether they are a toddler or a senior citizen.

The zoo is broken down into three main divisions to make it easier to navigate, and it has some of the most famous exhibits in America. Among the zoo’s most impressive attractions are a five-acre primate exhibit, a three-acre cat exhibit and two famous giant pandas named Ya Ya and Le Le. In fact, The Memphis Zoo is one of only four American zoos to exhibit giant pandas. The zoo also contains exhibits featuring komodo dragons, polar bears and an aquarium, among the many other attractions. The zoo has a gift shop, activities for young children and it hosts many events throughout the year. Entry prices range from $10 for children to $15 for adults, with an additional $5 charge for parking.

Giant Panda Zoo

2. Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

Jack and Marilyn Belz started the Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art in the 1990’s when they decided to share much of their massive personal collection with the world. The couple had become enthralled with global art and started the museum to celebrate the legacy of worldwide works of art as well as Asian and Judaic culture. The museum features over 1,000 objects from various time periods and societies including China, Russia, Italy, Israel and many Judaic cultures from around the world. Its exhibits include sculptures, paintings, pottery, photographs and various other cultural artifacts from all around the globe.

The Belz also recently introduced a Holocaust Memorial Gallery that provides personal testimonies, photographs and art associated with the Holocaust, as well as in-depth portraits of many survivors. According to the Belz, this gallery is not meant to memorialize the Holocaust as a general event, but rather to introduce visitors to the intimate and personal testimonies of those who suffered and survived its atrocities. The museum is located within walking distance of Beale Street and is also accessible by trolley from downtown Memphis. The entrance fee ranges from $4 for students, $5 for seniors and $6 for adults.

Photo by: Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art
Photo by: Belz Museum of Asian and Judaic Art

1. Mud Island

Mud Island is the perfect bookend to any trip to Memphis. It is a peaceful common that offers a relaxing experience where any visitor can take a load off and enjoy the serenity of the Mississippi River. Located on a Mississippi River peninsula, it houses a park, an amphitheater, museums and many restaurants. It is located 1.2 miles from downtown Memphis and is also accessible by many methods including monorail, ferry, by car and by walking. The River Park is free to all visitors and contains a scale reproduction of the city of Memphis as well as a replica of the Mississippi River that empties into a model of the Gulf of Mexico. The park also offers bike and hiking trails as well as pedal boats and rafts for rent.

The Mississippi River Museum is dedicated to the history of the Mississippi River and contains a replica of the steamboats that once graced the river’s waters. However, there is a $7 to $10 fee to enter the museum, depending on the visitors’ age. The 5,000-seat amphitheater is used primarily as a host venue for summer concert series and festivals, so if you’re looking for a serene experience, odds are that it will be quiet unless a festival is in progress.

Mud Island Memphis

The Most Dangerous Cities in the US

Forbes has released it’s annual “Most Dangerous Cities” list and we have all the information on which cities made the list this year. Before we begin, we should note that Forbes used a very strategic formula in choosing the cities for the list. “To compile the list, we start with the FBI’s Crime Statistics database, screening for cities with populations above 200,000,” the sites notes. “That eliminates cities like Flint, Mich., with its record-busting murder rate of 63 per 100,000, but allows us to focus on major American cities that presumably have full-fledged police departments.”

So, which cities topped the The Most Dangerous Cities in the US list? Scroll through to find out:

10. Milwaukee, Wisconsin

Violent Crime Rate: 1,295 per 100,000

Milwaukee Wisconsin Flag

9. Atlanta, Georgia

Violent Crime Rate: 1,379 per 100,000

Atlanta Georgia

8. Cleveland, Ohio

Violent Crime Rate: 1,384 per 100,000

Cleveland Ohio Flag

7. Baltimore, Maryland

Violent Crime Rate: 1,405 per 100,000

Baltimore Maryland

6. Birmingham, Alabama

Violent Crime Rate: 1,518 per 100,000

Birmingham California

5. Stockton, California

Violent Crime Rate: 1,548 per 100,000

Stockton California Flag 1

4. Memphis, Tennessee

Violent Crime Rate: 1,750 per 100,000

Memphis Tennessee Flag

3. St. Louis, Missouri

Violent Crime Rate: 1,777 per 100,000

St. Louis Missouri 1

2. Oakland, California

Violent Crime Rate: 1,993 per 100,000

Oakland California Flag

1. Detroit, Michigan

Violent Crime Rate: 2,123 per 100,000

Detroit

Curious which cities made the list in 2020? Read more about most dangerous cities in the US updated for 2020.

The World’s 10 Best Airports for Foodies

Stuck with a long layover at the airport and a hungry tummy?

Don’t worry; airport food isn’t quite as bad as it used to be. In fact, it’s quite surprisingly delicious in the following ten instances. These particular airport eats will have you traveling more often—just for the airport snack-attacks…

1. Atlanta International Airport, Georgia

The greatest thing about the Atlanta International Airport food court is that you don’t have to choose between sushi and a sandwich—you can have both in the form of a delectable sushi roll. These pork belly concoctions are the signature item on the menu at ‘One Flew Over’, the airport’s trendy dinning establishment that serves up entrees and cocktails so fine that you won’t believe you’re in an airport.

atlanta

2. Barcelona Airport, Spain

Not only does the airport in El Prat del Llobregat, Barcelona boast a Michelin-star-rated chef in Carles Gaig, if you’ve developed a taste for traditional Catalan dishes during your trip to Spain, you can have one last parting meal that you won’t forget at Restaurant Gaig, located in Porta Gaig in Terminal 1, where diners dig into succulent roast chicken and spicy veal before takeoff.

barcelona

3. Washington-Dulles International Airport, USA

If it’s good enough for President Obama, it’s good enough for us. Washington Dulles’ Five Guys, in Concourse A and B, isn’t just another burger chain. Made-to-order hamburgers and cheeseburgers served with copious amounts of fresh-cut French fries are the special here. Add on as many toppings as you want, including barbecue sauce, jalapeños, hot sauce, onions, mushrooms, and more. President Obama orders his cheeseburger with lettuce, tomato, jalapeños, and mustard.

washington

4. Seoul-Incheon International Airport, Korea

Not only will you be kept busy if you find yourself laid over in Seoul’s major airport with its full spa, premiere golf course, casino, not to mention the Museum of Korean Culture—your belly will also be happy! Why? Because it will be filled with a hot bowl of bibimbap, a traditional Korean dish that combines fragrant rice, chili paste, fresh thin-sliced vegetables, beef, and a fried egg. And you can procure one at Incheon Bibimbap, between rounds of golf or before a mani-pedi.

Korea

5. Austin-Bergstrom Airport, Texas, USA

One doesn’t venture through Texas without a catching a whiff of authentic, smoky barbecue and being lured into one of the smoke house restaurants at Austin-Bergstrom International Airport. Salt Lick BBQ at Gate 12 houses a traditional meat smoke pit and just the scent of their signature beef brisket or pork ribs will have you forgetting your next destination. Grab desert in the form of a whole made ice cream cone at Amy’s Ice Creams if you can choose from their wall of unique flavors like Sweet Cream, Oreo crush, or Mexican Vanilla.

texas

6. Hong Kong International Airport

If you haven’t had your fill of dumplings, prepare to be stuffed to the brim at Terminal 2 of the Hong Kong Airport, it’s a shopping, eating, shopping, and lounging oasis. Try a sampling at Tian Xia Dumplings for the great prices and the traditional street food-style flare or The Wing, if you want a fancier experience with full cocktail service.

hong kong

7. Memphis Airport, Tennessee, USA

If you don’t mind waiting in a lengthy line up; it’ll be worth your while at Ivar’s Seafood Bar, located at Gate B4 at the Memphis Airport. Sure, it’s a local fast-food seafood chain, however, you would hardly tell by the food—yummy seafood chowders, huge portions of fish and chips, crispy crab cakes, and friendly and gracious servers to boot! Ye haw!

Tennessee

8. London Heathrow Airport, UK

It might seem a tad odd to eat pan-Asian in the UK, but that doesn’t deter the crowds at Wagamama form waiting for some comfort food. This locale quickly serves up bowls of gyoza, soba, udon, and ramen smack-dab in the middle of Heathrow airport’s Terminal 5.

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9. Amsterdam-Schiphol Airport, Netherlands

Sucking juicy oysters and guzzling bubbly doesn’t sound like the typical airport experience—unless you’re dining at Bubbles Seafood & Wine Bar. Here the champagne and seafood never stop flowing. Plus the surroundings are quite lovely and lively with a huge saltwater aquarium and nearby casino.

Netherlands

10. Changi Airport, Singapore

I dare you to even try to rush your way through Changi Airport. The rows of street food stalls will stop you in your tracks with they’re spicy-garlic infused delectables—as strange as they are delicious. Choose from fish-head curries, spiced pork-rib soups, mutton noodles, and laksa, a fragrant coconut-curry soup.


Singapore