The Most Mind‑Blowing Places to Paraglide

What is the quintessential adrenaline rush exactly? For some it’s free-falling out of an airplane into endless sky while for others it’s diving into the deep depths of the ocean into waters teeming with eager sharks. The essential ingredient of any adventure trip is most definitely adrenaline, no matter what form it comes in. For those less willing to leap out of a perfectly good airplane, paragliding is a great alternative; a sort of slow-motion jump from a mountain top or towering hill that offers a similar experience to a free fall with the chance to take it all in at a slower pace.

8. Bazaruto Archipelago, Mozambique

Mozambique’s Bazaruto Archipelago is just 16 kilometers off the coast, one of the most remote places along the east coast of Africa and also one of the most beautiful with alabaster beaches and water like glass. It’s here where paragliders will find the ultimate in options; simply scale the massive dune, choose any launching point, and coast through the clouds through sun and along the sea. One of the most popular facets of this unparalleled paragliding location is the lack of obstacles: many people don’t bother with helmets or even shoes because there’s simply nothing to hit, making it a great place for novices to practice and for the more experienced to try more daring stunts. Condition are most dependable between May and October and low tide is ideal: paragliders can cost to the ocean and land along the beach.

7. Wengen, Canton of Bern, Switzerland

Valleys, vistas, and waterfalls make the base village of Wengen, Canton of Bern, Switzerland, an incredible, year-round destination for paragliding, hang gliding, and sky diving. Originally renowned for world=class hiking and skiing, Wengen has become a paramount European destination for heart-pumping, mountain-scaling adventures. Wengen gives way to the Lauterbrunnen Valley, known as the Valley of Waterfalls, where more than 70 waterfalls plummet down sky-scraping cliffs in an area with more than 11,000 feet between base camp and the Jungfrau summit–higher even than Mount Everest’s 10,000-foot elevation from base camp. For some paragliders, that’s reason enough to book a trip. Soar past immense alpine meadows, lush green valleys, snow capped chalets, and 19th century timber houses back into base camp and start over again or try out some equally blood-pumping activities like canyoneering (traversing canyons using various techniques like climbing and swimming) or river rafting.

6. Oludeniz, Turkey

Babadag Mountain is the place to be when planning any adventure sports in Fethiye, Turkey. It’s known as a Mecca for paragliders and other sky surfers: it towers over 5,900 feet and offers sublime views of the mountains and surrounding areas. That first view from the top can definitely induce some queasy feelings if you’ve never paraglided from that kind of height–everything below appears absolutely minuscule. Outfitters provide all necessary equipment, a jeep ride up the steep mountain, and a tandem jump that lasts over 20 minutes soaring over white sand beaches, lush green forest, and cobalt water before landing directly on Belcekiz Beach. Any adrenaline junkie will love the elevation here and the ease of the jump but be sure to watch out for fog which comes in regularly–it can turn a fantastic jump lethal.

5. Point of the Mountain, Utah, USA

For those less willing to paraglide from heights pushing into thousands of feet, Utah’s Point of the Mountain near Salt Lake City is great place to languidly fly from the top of the mountain to escape gravity and take in the surrounding scenery, whether on short flight or a longer haul adventure, the conditions are legendary; winds are consistently smooth, offering the greatest potential for both paragliding and hang gliding. Point of the Mountain is ideal for beginners, with several professional paragliding companies offering lessons, tandem flights, and tours, and advanced instruction. If you’re just a beginner wanting to take to the skies, Point of the Mountain is perfect. Beginner tandem flights can start as low as just five feet and range up to 2,000 feet, offering a level of comfort for just about anyone.

4. Valle de Bravo, Mexico

El Penon in Valle de Bravo, Mexico is one of the most famous sites for flying in the world, offering consistent conditions that can lead up to four hours flying every day. the inland thermal site is situated on the boundary of a strong network of ancient, inactive volcanoes enveloped by lush hills and blanketed in temperate, emerald forest. From December through March, these elements combine, providing incredible thermal soaring conditions within an area that perfectly compliments the lifestyle and flying schedule. Launching from El Penon is at more than 7,000 feet and the glide is easy given good conditions without too much wind. The access road is ideal for driving up, making it a cinch to arrive at the top and onsite amenities ensure you’re primed and ready to go before take off.

3. Kamshet, India

Anyone who’s been paragliding in India maintains that Kamshet, just 110 kilometers from Mumbai in the Western Ghats, is a paradise for sky launches and an ideal destination for adventure-seekers looking for a major rush. Avoiding monsoon season–typically from June through October–paragliders can head to Kamshet during the summer season between March and May for ideal conditions and temperatures. From the launch points of either east or west Tower Hill, gliders can experience some breathtaking scenes, including tiny villages dotting the entire mountain expanse. There are several guesthouses in the area accommodating paragliders in the immediate vicinity wanting to spend their entire time flying, with either tandem lessons and solo flying or strictly tandem flights. Outfitters also offer transport to Tower Hill each day. In thermal seasons, depending on conditions, launches can be extended, cross-country flights with incredible views and panoramas of the entire region.

2. Danyang, South Korea

Undescribable freedom ensues when defying gravity in Danyang, South Korea. Heading to the take-off points of either Mount Dusan or Mountan Yangbangsan, gliders enjoy a facility that’s well designed and only a two-hour drive from Seoul. If coming in from Seoul, booking a jump is easy and includes transportation from the city, equipment, tandem jumps, and extended lessons if desired (if you’re planning on the approach independently, there’s a direct bus to Danyang from the East Seoul Bus Terminal). Beginners generally always fly from Mount Yangbangsan which is near the downtown area and the site for standard training prior to departure. The views from this jump point are incredible and feature the Manhangang River below and the city spread out before you while mountains pass alongside. International and national competitions happen at this location, proving it’s better than any other paragliding point in the country.

1. Castelluccio, Umbria, Italy

The Apennines Mountains are a range in Italy comprised of a network of smaller chains spanning more than 1,100 kilometers along the peninsular length of Italy. They’re beautiful, home to countless lovely towns and villages, and offer one of the best spots in Europe for paragliding. The highest village in the Apennines Mountains is Castelluccio, most notable for vibrant valleys that begin showing off their blooms in early spring and through the summer months. It’s these kinds of scenes paired with alpine heights that have attracted numerous hang gliding and para gliding schools to establish themselves in the vicinity. The thermals here are extremely smooth and the air perfectly calm most of the year creating good conditions for first-time flyers while experienced pilots enjoy the challenges offered by heading to the summit of Monte Vettore and flying a different, more challenging route.

The World’s 8 Most Remote Hotels

Imagine touching down somewhere that few people have ever been, discovering a remote world that you didn’t know existed. Travelers are becoming more interested in places that offer more remoteness, that often take a journey to get to. Luckily the call for these types of places have been answered and throughout the world, remote hotels are popping up in places you didn’t even know existed. From a beachfront hotel in Iceland to a surfing getaway in Samoa, these 8 remote hotels all have a few things in common- exceptional accommodations, stunning scenery, delicious cuisine and an air of privacy.

8. Hotel Budir, Iceland

The only real beachfront hotel in Iceland lies next to a lava field with views over the Snaefellsnes glacier. The accommodations here are simple, chic and unpretentious offering a variety of rooms including eight rooms in the attic, one suite, nine deluxe rooms and ten standard rooms. In the wintertime, guests cozy up by the fireplace in the lobby while staring out the large windows at the breathtaking surroundings.

Summertime brings bonfire parties on the beach and swimming during the day. Guests here will be treated to exceptional service, an exquisite restaurant and one of the most beautiful landscapes in the world. The possibilities for activities here are endless and hotel staff is delighted to help guests plan whatever their heart desires, whether they want to take a tour by helicopter, go horseback riding, fishing and more.

Via Iceland Times

7. Fogo Island Inn, Newfoundland, Canada

Fogo Island is a remote island off the coast of Newfoundland, halfway between the North Pole and the Equator and home to the simple yet charming Fogo Island Inn. Open all year round, guests here are treated to the floor to ceiling views of the North Atlantic Ocean in one of 29 guest suites. Every piece of furniture and textile in the rooms are handcrafted, from the quilts to the chairs to the wallpaper.

Three meals a day are catered to suit your personal preferences along with snacks and focuses on fresh seasonal ingredients. In wintertime watch, as winter storms crash through, try your hand at cross-country skiing or ice fishing. In the spring the gigantic icebergs float by, bonfires are lit and wildlife viewing is at its finest. To get here, visitors have to take a ferry from Farewell Harbor or arrive in style in a helicopter.

Via Hospitality Net

6. Ultima Thule Lodge, Alaska

Deep in the Alaskan wilderness, hundreds of miles from paved roads sits this incredible remote lodge, taking people to places where nobody has gone before. It is a six-hour drive from Anchorage and then a 90-minute flight into the Wrangell Mountains to reach this lodge, set amongst the largest protected wilderness on earth. Visitors here should expect luxurious like bearskin rugs, floor-to-ceiling windows, a wood-fired sauna, freshly baked goods and stunning scenery.

There are no set itineraries at this lodge; every day is customized depending on the time of year, flying conditions and interests. Activities range from kayaking in a glacier-fed river, flying over the largest vertical rock face on earth, driving over glacier fields, and hiking across arctic tundra. Every experience at this lodge is unique and unforgettable and entirely worth the journey.

Via LiveTheLife.tv

5. Aganoa Lodge, Samoa

Surfing is the main draw at this ultra-remote lodge, located on Savai’i, the more remote of the two main islands of Samoa. This lodge offers fully guided surfing experiences for a maximum of eight guests while catering to non-surfers and families who want an active travel experience. Eight open-air bungalows set the stage for this beautiful experience, each one constructed of reclaimed timber and lava rocks that were collected on site.

Beautiful white sand and crystal clear water beckon guests to swim, snorkel, surf, kayak and more; with the included equipment from the lodge. Dinner is served nightly in the open lounge and features the fresh catch of the day, along with other incredible seasonal ingredients. Whether you are looking to surf, dine or relax; this remote lodge will appeal to you.

Via PegasusLodges

4. Lyngen Lodge, Norway

The ultimate remote getaway for winter sports enthusiasts is Lyngen Lodge, a remote lodge offering luxury accommodation, top quality cuisine and epic adventures in the world’s most beautiful and undisturbed arctic regions on earth. The lodge only caters to 18 guests at a time so expect a personalized retreat with incredible cuisine and exceptional customer service. Relax in the center of the lodge where large panoramic windows offer spectacular views of the Lyngen Alps and a crackling fireplace keeps you warm.

Activities here include dog sledding, snowmobiling, skiing, Northern Lights viewing, boat tours, water sports, and Heli-hiking. Whether you choose to come in the winter for the unforgettable skiing or the summer for the abundance of activities, chances are, the experience will be unforgettable.

Via Natural World Safari

3. Yemaya Island Hideaway, Little Corn Island, Nicaragua

Little Corn Island is literally a speck in the in Caribbean Ocean, 43 miles off the east coast of Nicaragua. Getting here requires multiple forms of transportation including flight, taxi, panga boat and your own two feet. The reward is well worth it though, 16 private cabanas nestled among swaying coco palms with views of the crystal clear ocean. Private outdoor verandahs, a rainforest shower, and beautiful handcrafted furnishings await you.

Dining is done in the open-air restaurant that serves up local and organic ingredients grown on site along with fresh seafood. Guests here can enjoy activities such as daily yoga, sailing, kayaking, snorkeling, paddle boarding and incredible spa treatments. This hideaway offers the chance to reconnect, explore nature and live carefree, if only for a few short days.

Via Small Luxury Hotels

2. The Oberoi Vanyavilas, India

Situated just ten minutes from Ranthambhore National Park, this is a chance for visitors to get up close and personal with the incredible Royal Bengal Tigers in the wild, while staying at an amazing remote hotel. Accommodations are in luxury tents, complete with a four-poster bed, a claw-footed tub, personal stocked bar, silk bathrobes and more.

Dining is done in the main hall of the restaurant in the winter time in front of an open wood fireplace while the outside courtyard becomes transformed into a restaurant in the summer complete with bonfires, candles and folk musicians. Explore the national park with its incredible ruins, elephants; hundreds of species of birds and of course the majestic tigers. Pamper yourself at the beautiful spa, have a private candlelit dinner or learn how to cook with Indian Spices; whatever your heart desires, you will find it here.

Via Jetsetter

1. Mashpi Lodge, Ecuador

Perched at 3,116 feet above sea level in between rainforest and cloud forests sits an incredible lodge, surrounded by plants, orchids and a staggering 500 species of birds; along with monkeys, pumas and an abundance of waterfalls. Luxury and nature merge here at this five-star lodge where rooms feature floor-to-ceiling windows and glass walls that look out into the lush forest.

The towering two-story dining room features fully panoramic views and seasonal menu items that are prepared fresh by fine dining chefs. Top naturalist guides are on hand to take you through the surrounding trails and explain the flora and fauna that surrounds you. Voted as one of the most unique lodges in the world by National Geographic; this remote hotel is not to be missed.

Via Mashpi Lodge

The 12 Most Unique Movie Theaters in the World

Forget watching Netflix at home or going to a regular movie theatre, all around the world from the United States to Norway to the UK there are some extremely unique theatres to visit. Some take credit for being hundreds of years old while others use new technology to wow moviegoers. From an elementary school turned brewpub/theatre to an outdoor cinema set up in a cemetery; here are our top 12 choices for the most unique movie theatres in the world.

12. Kennedy School, Portland, OR

This one time elementary school has been turned into a 35-room hotel, restaurant, and movie theatre, all thanks to McMenamins, a local empire of brewpubs and entertainment venues. The movie theatre located in the school’s old auditorium is a mix of comfortable sofas, armchairs, and tables for two. It can fit up to 300 guests inside where second-run feature films are shown nightly.

Mommy matinees are shown during the day from Tuesdays to Thursday s where kids and their parents can come enjoy the first show, and it won’t matter to anyone if the wee ones fuss. Admission here is a steal, at just $4 per person and just $2 a child. There is a special theatre lounge and lobby to grab a drink and bite to eat before the show, or put in your order, as servers will come to your seat throughout the movie so you don’t have to miss a minute of it. Not surprisingly there are a number of McMenamins Craft Beers on tap here!

Via Lonely Planet

11. Colosseum Kino, Oslo, Norway

It is the largest cinema in Northern Europe and the largest THX cinema in the world and is dominating in structure due to its large spherical dome. The grey and cream dome looks more like a futuristic spaceship rather than a movie theatre but it was actually built in 1921.

Throughout its 90 year history, the Colosseum Kino has managed to keep up with technological advances such as sounds systems, and ticketing systems. In 1998 the theatre closed down for a period of time in which major interior and exterior renovations were made.

Via Cinemaholic

10. The Castro Theatre, San Francisco

Built in 1922 by pioneer San Francisco theatre entrepreneurs, this is one of the last remaining movie palaces in the nation that was built in the 1920’s that is still in operation. Both outside and it is breathtakingly gorgeous with the inside being just a touch more luxurious. Expect to see foamy balconies, wall-mounted busts of heroic figures and an auditorium that seat over 1,400 guests in a fantasy setting that is both lavish and intimate.

On either side of the screen are large organ grills, a large art deco chandelier hangs from the room and two dramatic staircases lead to the mezzanine and balcony. Showing here are foreign films, classic revivals, festivals and some of the most intense audiences in town.  In recent years the sound quality has been improved, new stage lighting was installed and larger and more comfortable seats were put on the main floor.

9. Electric Cinema, London

Visitors to the Electric Cinema in London should expect luxury service in this adults aimed hideout in the chic Notting Hill Neighborhood. It is one of the oldest working cinemas in the country, opening in 1910 and has run almost continuously since that time. The interior of the theater is made up of 65 leather armchairs with footstools and side tables, three 2-seater sofas at the rear and six double beds in the front row.

To make things even better, individual cashmere blankets are provided for guests. The bar opens 10 minutes before screening time, whereas the movie starts 30 minutes after screening time. Offering wine, beer, champagne and a variety of snacks; one must get their food and drinks ahead of time. On Monday mornings babies and their caregivers are invited to Electric Scream, a screening designed especially for them.

Via YouTube

8. Raj Mandir Cinema, Jaipur, India

It is nicknamed the “Pride of Asia” and is considered the crown jewel of India’s cinemas, and certainly lives up to its reputation. The theatre was created to make guests feel as though they were royal guests of a palace, a place full of style and elegance. Walking into this theatre is an experience unlike any other, high ceilings hung with huge chandeliers, lighting that changes from white to blue and walls covered in artistic artwork.

The seating here is divided into four sections, Pearl, Ruby, Emerald, and Diamond and once you are seated you will be faced with a huge screen covered by velvet curtains. This is such an experience that every single movie showing over the past 25 years has had a full house, now that is something to brag about. There certainly doesn’t seem to be any better place to take in the colorful sights and sounds of a Bollywood film.

7. Cine de Chef, Seoul, South Korea

This cinema gives a new meaning to “dinner and a movie” with its small luxurious theatre. Couples will begin their night by dropping their car off at the valet and taking the private elevator up to Cordon Bleu café for a quick meal before the show. Think upscale cuisine with a twist. Moviegoers are than put into a private screening room that seats just a handful of patrons.

The comfortable reclining chairs were designed by the same people who design seats for the United Arab Emirates Royalty and once you sit down you may never want to get back up. Footstools, side tables, and lamps complete the picture of this awesome yet small venue. Tickets start at just $54 per person for both dinner and a movie.

Via designseoda

6. Rooftop Cinema, Melbourne, Australia

Sitting on a rooftop bar watching a movie play on a large projection screen sounds like a dream come true. In fact, it is actually reality at the Rooftop Cinema in Melbourne Australia. Open daily from 11am-1am it is easy to grab a drink before the movie starts and hang around long after the credits roll. The rooftop cinema is open from December to April and prices start at $22 per person.

The seating up here is incredibly comfortable deck chairs and blankets are available to rent for just $5 for the course of the movie. Showings include art house films, classics, and recent releases. It is fully licensed up on this roof and moviegoers often bring up their cocktails and brews from the bar below. Enjoy the sky above you, the grass beneath you and an incredible view of the Melbourne skyline.

Via Time Out

5. Cinespia at Hollywood Forever Cemetery, Los Angeles, CA

The outdoor movie screenings here are hard to beat in terms of being unique as they are held on Fairbanks Lawn, an open grassy field inside the Hollywood Forever Cemetery; yes we did just say cemetery. Moviegoers here are responsible for bringing their own low lying chairs, blankets and pillows as well as picnics, wine and beer (note that no spirits are allowed). The Forever Cemetery is the final resting place for many, including John Huston, Peter Lorre, Bugsy Siegel and more.

The showing range from comedies to horror to old school classics and tickets generally cost $10-$15. Guests arriving at the showing will walk through the beautiful and historic cemetery before plunking down in front of the screen. There are restrooms on site to use and there are no in and out privileges. If you thought that watching a scary movie in a normal cinema was scary, wait until you watch one in a cemetery.

Via Hollywood Reporter

4. Alamo Drafthouse, Austin, TX

This quirky indie movie chain was started by a husband and wife team that had no movie qualifications, other than being devoted movie fans. Striving to create the perfect viewing experience for movie lovers there are some strict rules to follow here in order for everyone to enjoy. Some of these rules include absolutely no talking, no cell-phone usage, no unaccompanied children, no babies and no ads before the movies.

What you can expect is high quality and locally sourced food and beer that are served to your seat. This movie chain also runs some incredible events across their theatres. It once showed the Lord of the Rings Trilogy where viewers were only permitted to eat when the characters ate on screen, or how about the events when they call for every viewer to dress like a certain character. Its how movie showing should be, uninterrupted, fun and enjoyable.

Via Alamo Drafthouse Cinema

3. Secret Cinema, Unknown

Once a month moviegoers can be part of a secret audience, secret location and essentially a secret world. Secret Cinema brings together film, music, art, and theatre to create a larger than life experience in abandoned spaces. This is an entirely immersive experience where audiences must dress up as the characters or of the era of the film. They also have the chance to interact with the spectators and actors while having food and drinks, living in the world of the film before setting in to watch the film.

Tickets are not cheap for the event and start around $75 Great British Pounds per adult. Viewers must register online to receive the secret email for which film will be next on the list. Although this is not a standalone theatre, the concept and the delivery of these movies is a once in a lifetime opportunity.

Via Stevenfollows.com

2. Hot Tub Cinema, UK, USA, Ibiza

One way to get people talking is to combine hot tubs and movies, because who doesn’t love both! This company started by combining great films with amazing space, lots of hot tubs and incredible people. The mantra here is that they don’t want you to watch films but instead celebrate them. This means your movie experience will be unlike any other you have had before.

Moviegoers are encouraged to dress up, sing, dance, drink and play, as well as spending plenty of time in the hot tub. With movies such as Dirty Dancing, Free Willy, Back to the Future and other classics, tickets sell out fast. Whole tubs can be rented out by buying 6 tickets for a friend or you can buy a pair of tickets and make some new friends as you share a hot tub. There are personalized tub waiters for each hot tub and you can assure this may just be the best night of your life.

Via AWOL

1. Sol Cinema, South Wales

It prides itself as the world’s smallest solar movie theatre and we have to say this may, in fact, be the most unique movie theatre in the world. The Sol Cinema is actually a mobile cinema in a caravan that is powered entirely by the sun. It can accommodate up to 8 adults comfortably and the choice is yours as to which movie is playing. Inside comfortable benches and surround sounds create the perfect viewing experience.

Guests here will get the utmost luxury treatment complete with a red carpet, usherette service and popcorn to snack on. The idea behind this solar movie theatre came when they wanted to reduce their own CO2 emissions but also show what is achievable with solar power. Creating this small cinema allows hundreds of people to be entertained on a daily basis and gives something unique and incredible to both creators and viewers.

Via Digital Spy

The 9 Best Street Foods in India

India and street food truly go hand in hand with streets in every city lined with vendors looking to fill your belly with delicious eats. These street vendors have been operating for generations and although each city has its own specialties, the following are street foods that must be tried on any trip here. From rolls to puff pastries to spicy green chutney; these mouthwatering delights will have you booking your trip to India in no time.

9. Pani Puri

You will find this street food pretty much anywhere in India and you certainly cannot go wrong when you stop to grab some Pani Puri. What exactly is this dish though? A crisp fried sphere which is hollow is filled with a delicious combination of potato, chickpeas, onion and sprouted lentils. The sphere is then dunked into a mix of tamarind and jaggery and then into a liquid blend of coriander, mint and masala. The end result is an incredible ball of flavor that pops in your mouth as you eat it. One thing to watch out for with this dish is ensuring that the vendor is using mineral water, unless you have a stomach of steel. Find it everywhere, order and pull up a stool with the locals as you chow down on one of India’s most favorite street foods.

Pani Puri

8. Chole Bhature

This dish is famous all over India but most eaten in Delhi where there seem to be vendors on every corner. This heavy breakfast food consists of a combination of spicy and creamy chick peas and puffy hot fried bread called Bhatura. This bread is achieved after the dough is fermented for almost an hour then sprinkled with Indian masalas and stuffed with fresh crumbled paneer. It is generally accompanied by a yogurt-type drink and onion, pickle and green chutney. If you happen to be in Delhi eating this dish, most locals recommend going to Sita Ram Diwan Chand. Here the filling is both sweet and spicy; the bread puffy but not overbearing and it is served with incredible sweet and sour chutney.

Photo by: Little Black Book
Photo by: Little Black Book

7. Vada Pav

It is truly the Indian version of the American hamburger, and everyone’s grab and go snack in India. It is one of the most loved street foods across the country and is not only cheap but incredibly delicious as well. What this “burger” consists of are potato patties that have been mashed with garlic, chilies and coriander that are then dipped in chickpea flour, fried golden, then laid in the bun or as they call it the “pav”. The pav is a springy white bun that’s well buttered, spread with coriander chutney and sprinkled with garlic and chili powder. It is often accompanied by red or green chutneys and fried green chilies. Most famous in Mumbai, it seems anywhere you get this treat, it’s amazing.

Vada Pav

6. Chaat

It is a North Indian staple that is now offered across every city and state in a variety of different options. Over the course of time this dish has evolved and every town and every vendor serves up something a little different. Legend has it that Chaat was born out of the royal kitchen of emperor Shah Jahan who was ordered to consume foods that were light in his stomach but high on spice. What Chaat actually consists of will vary from vendor to vendor but they will all have something in common; they are crispy, sweet, spicy and sour all rolled into one. Some of the more famous chaats are bhel puri, dahi puri, paani puri and papdi chaat.

Chaat india

5. Litti-Chokha

This street food is mostly found in India’s Bihar state and although one often confuses it with Baati, it is actually prepared completely different and has its own unique textures and taste. Litti consists of wheat and powdered gram or lentil that is formed into balls and covered with spices. They are then injected with clarified butter by a hole and cooked in a wok of boiling oil. Ingredients used in this dish include sattu, chana, and chokha. Most people tuck this treat into breakfast, lunch or dinner, as there is no bad time to indulge in this awesome street food.

Photo by: Rachnas Kitchen
Photo by: Rachnas Kitchen

4. Aloo Tikki

This North Indian snack means potato croquette when translated and can be found in almost every shop and stall in Delhi and throughout the country. This piping hot snack is prepared from boiled potatoes, onions and various spices. Along with the potatoes and onion you can expect red and green chutney, coriander-mint sauce or sometimes even yogurt and chick peas.

Aloo Tiki

3. Kachori

This spicy street snack is found all over India although rumor has it the best place to have it is in Bikaner, a former princely state in Rajasthan. Kachori are small, crisp, golden fried puri, stuffed with a dry, spiced filling and sometimes served with curried potato. There are different variations of the Kachori including the Pyaaj Kachori (onion kachori and the Mawa Kachori which is a sweet dish dipped in sugar syrup. Crispy, tasty and readily available, it doesn’t get much better than that.

Kachori

2. Bhelpuri

Often associated with the beaches of Mumbai, Bhelpuri is a mixture of Muri (puffed rice), crushed papri, chopped onions, potato and coriander, sev or bhujiya and mix of sweet chili chutney and tamarind sauce. It is most often served in a cone of newspaper and it comes with a wooden ice cream spoon, making it not only delicious but a lot of fun to eat.

Bhelpuri

1. Kati Roll

Originating from Kolkata, India, this skewer-roasted kebab (chicken, lamb or sometimes meat) wrapped in paratha bread is perfect for the meat eater. It is layered with onion, sauces including ketchup and chili, and normally a spicy green chutney. Some people like to add on a layer of egg to add even more taste and protein. The whole thing is wrapped in newspaper and although countries around the world are trying to replicate this dish, there is nothing better than an authentic Kati Roll in India.

Photo by: The Worldly Vegetarian
Photo by: The Worldly Vegetarian

India’s 9 Coolest Cultural Festivals

India is renowned throughout the world as a country with abounding traditional and cultural festivals because of the many different religions and cultures it has. It doesn’t matter which month of the year it is, it isn’t difficult to find at least a few exciting festivals to attend within almost any vicinity–that’s the beauty of India. India’s people love to celebrate, to honor, to dance, to sing, to perform, to challenge–you’ll find almost every form of the arts in many festivals across the country. With thousands of customs and traditions, there’s never a lack of excitement, awe, passion, and intrigue in each unique Indian cultural festival.

9. Ladakh Festival

Each year from September 20th-September 26th, the Ladakh Festival kicks off in the Himalayas coldest reaches, a secluded destination that comes alive come the summer months with a colorful burst of life lasting through the short warm period. As a goodbye to summer, the festival highlights regional culture and sports in a week long dynamic event of archery and polo, sports, handicrafts, and ritual dancing. The destination itself is stunning and worth a visit, especially this time of year. The exhibitions of thanga, a rare type of embroidery painting done on silk, are an exceptional sight. There are also organized treks and white water expeditions to be enjoyed.

Ladakh Festival

8. Kala Ghoda Arts Festival

The nine-day-long Kala Ghoda Arts Festival begins annually on the first Saturday of February and traditionally comes to an end on the final Sunday of the same month in Mumbai’s Kala Ghoda region. Inaugurated in 1999, the festival has seen massive growth over the years in both popularity and stature, attracting people from all over the country and the world. The non-profit team organizing the festival aims to bring awareness to the arts in this particular area and make Mumbai an official art district. A wealth of literary workshop, cultural performances, special theater events, and rows upon rows of food stalls are the focal point. Heritage walks, film screenings, and kid’s events are also at the forefront of this lively and exciting festival.

Photo by: 19idealogues
Photo by: 19idealogues

7. Prithvi Theatre Festival

In Mumbai’s Maharashtra district, Prithvi Theatre Festival is a huge event, one that begins in the first week of November. Started by one of Bollywood’s most popular actors, Prithviraj Kapoor, this event honors the finest of performing arts and promotes and nurtures the most impressive talent going. In the past, one of the most unique aspects of the festival is the Fringe Theater, where experimental performances are performed in front of smaller audiences. There are acoustic jam sessions, and a program called Stage Talk, where actors reminisce about some of their most interesting experiences. If you’re a stage show buff or just enjoy the odd theater piece, this festival is well worth attending, even if just for one show.

Photo by: My Theatre Cafe
Photo by: My Theatre Cafe

6. Hornbill Festival

The Hornbill Festival in Nagaland is a premier cultural festival which was started by the Indian government to encourage and promote interaction between separate tribes and to boost the state’s cultural heritage. The cultural displays at this festival are wondrous and a solid introduction to India’s many unique traditions. Nagaland, situated in India’s northeast region, borders Burma, Asam, Arunchal Pradesh and Manipur, and boasts lush hills and mountains, small traditional villages, and scenic rice terraces within one of India’s smallest states. There are 16 major tribes in Nagaland, all of whom take part in the Hornbill Festival in Naga Heritage Village, less than 10 kilometers from the capital of Kohima. Major food events, ceremonies, crafts markets, and dynamic performances are part of the celebration. On display are some incredible local arts including wood carvings, painting, and sculptures. Herbal medicine stalls are a big favorite as is the Naga wrestling and music concerts.

Hornbill Festival

5. Khajuraho Dance Festival

The Khajuraho Dance Festival is Indian dance at its finest, coming back to its birthplace inside the 1,000 year-old Khajurho temples which are an exceptional backdrop to the ancient art form. Khajuraho Dance Festival is a week-long festival that happens annually in the first week of February in the Madhya Pradesh district of Chhatarpur in India’s central region. Once the sun sets, spectators really get a show as when the temples are illuminated in golden light, the perfect backdrop for a journey from past to present. The sounds of the tanpura and flute set the mood while the tabla beat and the mridangam (a double-headed, barrel shaped Indian drum) carry out the rhythms echoed by a string of bells called the ghungroo often strapped to the dancer and carrying out the beats of the movements. This festival, in one of India’s most famous temple towns, is a highlight for any performance art enthusiast.

Khajuraho Dance Festival

4. Onam

Onam is one of the most significant festivals in the state of Kerala, in southern India. This distinguished Hindu festival is a harvest celebration revered by people from all across the state to cherish King Mahabali–it is said his spirit visit’s Kerala during Onam. Onam starts at the onset of the month of Chingam, the Malayalam calendar’s first month and lasts anywhere from four days to ten days with the first day and the last day being most prominent. Prior to any festival celebrations, around ten days before Onam officially kicks off, locals prepare floral arrangements and set them outside their front doors on the ground, like an offering. During the festival, the shining star is an event called Puli Kali, which is a unique and electrifying type of dance, drama, folk art, and music. There are also snake boat races, elephant processions, exquisite dances, lively games, and extravagant feats.

Onam flowers india

3. Nehru Trophy Boat Race

In beautiful Kerala, on the Malabar Coast in southern India, the Nehru Trophy Boat Race proceeds along the languid backwaters of the Alleppey, a regatta held on the second Saturday each August since 1952. The power coming from the rowers in this championship race is palpable–you’ve not seen or heard such enthusiasm since the World Cup. The best way to catch the race is to head there as early as you can manage and grab a spot along Punnamada riverbanks where you can watch the lengthy “snake” boats, called Chundan Vallam, each holding four rowers at the helm and more than 100 at the main oars. Though the Chundan Vallam races are the most exciting and popular, there are several different racing categories featuring different boats. You can buy VIP passes to Nehru Trophy Boat Race for under $30 USD or go with the basic standing room along the bamboo terraces for less than $2 USD.

Nehru Trophy Boat Race

2. Jaisalmer Desert Festival

Rajasthan’s Jaisalmer Desert Festival is another celebration held in mid-February, which almost seems to be festival month in India. This is the ultimate in India’s exotic festivals, and one that features an incredible and completely unforgettable fiesta. For three long and tireless days, locals play mesmerizing music, dance without end, host fascinating competitions–think turban-tying, a pageant for “Best Desert Man,” and best mustache along with fantastic handicraft bazaars. This is, hands-down, the essential festival for all things Rajasthani and one of the most popular festivals attended by tourists, both foreign and Indian. Besides the cultural performances, food, and music, there is camel polo, camel rides, and a tug-of-war with (you guessed it) camels! This all happens with an ideal backdrop: the Jaisalmer fort, with fireworks lighting up the sky at night to end the perfectly festive days.

Jaisalmer Desert Festival

1. Goa Carnival

Goa’s biggest and best street carnival is one you won’t want to miss if traveling into the region in the first week of March. In fact, it’s a festival worth traveling for if at all possible. The Goa Carnival is a kaleidoscopic show of bright, dazzling floats adorned with dancers and performers dressed in a rainbow of colorful costumes–the air is filled with spirit, celebration, and endless music. This carnival is a legacy, one that follows Christian traditions heralded into Goa by the Portuguese in 1510. Each year, the carnival begins on the Saturday prior to Ash Wednesday and continues for four straight days. This fete combines the celebration of diverse beliefs, cultures, and religions with street shows happening alongside religious ceremonies. The vivid and energetic parades take place in four cities: Vasco, Margao, Mapusa and the capital of Panaji.

Photo by: Youtube/JoeGoaUk
Photo by: Youtube/JoeGoaUk

The 6 Worst Luxury Hotel Openings of 2015

Luxury Travel Intelligence (LTI), a members-only luxury travel organization aimed at high rollers and those with deep pockets has released their annual list of the Worst Luxury Hotel Openings of 2015. While most of us would probably give our right arm for a chance to stay in these high end establishments, the company described many of the properties to make this years list as underwhelming and disenchanting. Maybe they’re being a little harsh or perhaps you just come to expect certain things when paying these kind of nightly rates… either way, here are the six worst luxury hotel openings of 2015:

6. Lanesborough, London

The 5 star, 93-room Lanesborough Hotel was re-opened this year in central London after being closed for renovations since December 2013. The renovations cost a reported £80 million, but bucking the trend for simplistic, pared-down style hasn’t won them any praise.

Photo by: Luxury Hotel Experts
Photo by: Luxury Hotel Experts

5. EDITION, Miami Beach

The Mariott/Ian Schrager owned EDITION Hotel in Miami Beach, Florida was closed for renovations for nearly four years and officially re-opened at the beginning of 2015. After that kind of time, you expect it to have been worth the wait, but according to reports, it lands on this year’s luxury worst list as a result of terrible service.

Photo by: Edition Hotels
Photo by: Edition Hotels

4. Zaya Nurai, Abu Dhabi

Abu Dhabi’s Zaya Nurai Island resort touts itself as “the most sought-after luxury beach resort” according to the resort website, but finds itself in the number four spot on this years worst luxury hotel opening list. Reports say the hotel just isn’t on par with the amazing beauty of it’s island location.

Photo by: Expedia
Photo by: Expedia

3. St. Regis, Mumbai

Coming in third is the St. Regis Hotel in Mumbai, India. Normally a very highly regarded hotel brand, this St. Regis property seems to have landed itself on this years worst luxury hotel list as a result of “a rushed and badly executed takeover of an existing (and troubled) property – The Palladium” reports LTI.

Photo by: CNN Traveler
Photo by: CNN Traveler

2. Shangri-La’s Le Touessrok, Mauritius

The Shangri-La Le Touessrok Resort on the East African island of Mauritius re-opened in November of this year after an extensive 6 month renovation. Despite these efforts to upgrade, LTI named the property as #2 on this years list due to customer reports of “poor service and inadequate staff training plus a distinct impression that management is not present.”

Photo by: CPP Luxury
Photo by: CPP Luxury

1. Nobu, Manilla

Oscar-winning actor Robert De Niro won’t be please to see his Manila, Philippines property ranked as this years number one worst luxury hotel opening of 2015. The American Actor co-owns the Nobu Hotel with chef Nobu Matsuhisa and Hollywood producer Meir Teper. While the 312-room City of Dreams property only opened in May of this year, reports say the 5-star hotel underwhelms at every turn and LTI reports “some questionable developments and over expansion.”

Philippines New Casino

The 8 Oldest Hotels in the World

Since the dawn of time, humans have been wanderers, from our forager ancestors to today’s modern travelers. But at the end of the day, we always seek shelter: a room and perhaps a nice meal. Until we lose our natural instinct to wander, hotels and inns will always be a staple of human culture. Proof of the longevity of our wandering ways exists in hotel establishments that have existed for centuries—like these 8 historic hotels, at least 1 of which has been offering room and board to travelers for over a millennium.

8. Rambagh Palace, India

Brian A. Vikander / Getty Images

Simply put, Rambagh Palace has a storied history. The “Jewel of Jaipur” was built in 1835 for the queen’s favorite handmaiden, a woman called Kesar Bedaran. Later, the building was refurbished and renovated, eventually becoming the royal residence of Maharaja Sawai Man Singh II in 1925. Before that, the mansion had been a hunting lodge and a school. What was destined to become the hotel became a lively scene for Jaipur’s charismatic royalty and the guests they entertained. In 1957, the building became a hotel; its legacy of hosting illustrious guests continued with stays by the likes of Prince Charles and Jackie O., among others. Rambagh Palace continues to live up to its name and its history by pulling out all the stops for those travelers who want to travel in the lap of luxury—even for just a day or two.

7. Hotel Balzac, France

Swanky hotels and Paris seem to go hand in hand, but nowhere is that more true than the Hotel Balzac. The hotel was built in the early 19th century by banker Nicolas Beaujon and was admired for its exotic style. After Beaujon’s death, the building changed hands a few times, before becoming a salon for epicureans and champagne aficionados. It was purchased in 1846 by Honore de Balzac, one of the founders of realist literature and author of over 100 novels and plays that depicted life in post-Napoleonic France. Balzac’s legacy lives on, as many famous writers have been influenced by his work. The hotel features collections of books, scenes from Balzac’s works and lithographs that depict the author. Minutes away from the Arc de Triomphe, the hotel’s restaurant is still famed for its contemporary French cuisine offerings.

 

6. Claridge’s, UK

Located in Mayfair, London, on the corner of Brook and Davies Streets, Claridge’s has sometimes been described as an annex to Buckingham Palace, thanks to its connections with Europe’s royals. The hotel began life in 1812—more than 200 years ago—as the Mivart’s Hotel. In 1850, the Claridges, who operated a small hotel near the property (which had expanded into several houses around it) purchased it and combined the businesses. In 1860, Empress Eugenie, the wife of Napoleon III, made an extended stay. The hotel was purchased by the Savoy Group in the 1890s and demolished, then rebuilt. The 1898 building still stands today. The hotel also still plays host to guests of the royal family, as well as celebrities. Claridge’s hosts a Michelin-starred restaurant, currently Fera, and is famed for their Christmas tree display.

5. Villa Orso Grigio, Italy

This cute little hotel may seem, at first glance, pretty modern. Its architecture is undecided about whether it’s a castle or a church, and it only has 10 rooms—a boutique hotel, to be sure. Even the services offered by the hotel—including wine tastings and spa services—can seem rather modern. But the Orso Grigio originally opened in the 14th century, then known as the Grauer Bär (the Grey Bear, in German). Since then, the property has changed not only hands but countries too—the market town of Ronzone, in the Dolomite Alps, was annexed by Italy from Austria in the 20th century. The Orso Grigio was originally built to serve nobility and merchants, and if you look closely, you can see that hotelier brothers Christian and Renzo Bertol keep the old world charm alive in their hotel, offering amenities like a cigar room and private gardens.

 

4. Blaue Gans, Austria

The Blaue Gans is a medieval hotel and you can tell; it is called the Blue Goose, after all. The inn is the oldest in the Austrian city of Salzburg, opening its doors in 1350. It’s located near prime historic sites in the city, such as the birthplace of Mozart, which is just a short walk away. These days, the hotel is also Salzburg’s first “art hotel,” housing almost 100 original works of art, which you can find strewn about in hallways, reception, and other public areas—making the hotel almost like your own private art gallery. The contrast between modernity and medieval sensibility makes for a striking atmosphere. The hotel also boasts a bar and restaurant and plays host to celebrations. Visit their “Wine Archive” after a long day of sight-seeing and unwind in the sunshine in their outdoor dining area.

3. Zum Roten Bären, Germany

The name loosely translates as “the red bear” and this Freiburg hotel is reputedly Germany’s oldest. Zum Roten Bären has been around since 1311, and the long line of innkeepers over the centuries can be traced back to the Bienger family that took possession of the inn that year; Wolf Eschger, the current landlord, is the 51st in this line! The building is also one of the oldest in Freiburg itself, with its foundations predating the foundation of the city 1120. The historic hotel is located in the heart of the Old Town, near the Freiburg Cathedral and the Swabian gate, as well as other popular tourist attractions in this university town. If you want local hospitality with access to some of the city’s storied sights, you can’t go wrong choosing Zum Roten Bären as your home away from home.

 

2. The Old Bell Hotel, UK

Loretta Damska / Shutterstock

This Malmsebury hotel first opened its doors to travelers in 1220. The inn was envisioned by an abbot, probably thinking of putting up world-weary pilgrims traveling through Wiltshire. In a building this old, you can probably expect a haunt or 2. The Old Bell is rumored to be haunted by the Grey Lady, said to be the spirit of a young bride who was stood up at the altar. In the “new” wing of the building, constructed during the 1700s, you can find a bar and restaurant, so you can pick up a bite to eat as you pass through, even if you don’t plan to spend the night. Of course, the Old Bell, which bills itself as England’s oldest hotel, offers a full English breakfast and traditional afternoon tea.

1. Hoshi Ryokan, Japan

Where in the world is the oldest hotel? Consult the Guinness Book of World Records and they’ll tell you it’s in Japan: the Hoshi Ryokan was long purported to be the oldest hotel, although it has since been displaced by another Japanese hotel. Nonetheless, the Hoshi Ryokan opened its doors in 718 and never looked back; the inn has been in the family for 46 generations and has been serving guests for over 1,200 years. The hotel is a traditional Japanese inn (ryokan) and features an ofuro, a traditional Japanese bathing room. In areas with onsen, hot springs, the ofuro will use water from the spring. Ryokan also allows visitors to wear yukata, a more relaxed version of traditional Japanese dress, and most have a relatively informal entrance where guests can congregate and even speak with the owner. Hoshi Ryokan is located in the Awazu Onsen area of Komatsu.

The Top Places To See Before It’s Too Late

Technically we are all in places that are about to change drastically. There are many remote idyllic, places being threatened by climate change that face melting glaciers or catastrophic flooding. But then so does Miami. Whether it’s rising sea levels, desertification, torrential monsoons, melting glaciers or ocean acidification, climate change is rapidly altering the landscape of our planet and perhaps about to destroy some of the world’s legendary vacation spots. Then there is the traditional destruction inflicted by human error and downright imbecility. More hotel rooms, spas and golf courses are part of the inherent contradictions of tourism increasing accessibility means increasing degradation. There seems to be no solution to that equation. We will be one of the last generations to see some of the Earth’s most cherished places. Here’s our list of 20 places to see before they vanish to climate change, over development and encroachment. It’s a survey of various sources from CNN to MNN (as in Mother Nature Network), at the same time being quite conscious of the other contradiction that advising more people to visit already vulnerable sites is farther contributing to the degradation. Perhaps you can solve that moral quandary by designing am environmentally sensitive visit. Or contribute to conservancy groups that are fighting to save them.

20. Gozo, Malta

CNN has this theory that once a foreign city is featured in a blockbuster movie, it takes a hit from an influx of curious tourists. Gozo, population 37,000 is a short ferry ride from Malta. Its website proudly proclaims its natural beauty, its “tortoise-like pace” and amazing history. Gozo means ‘joy’ in Castilian, so named at its founding in 1282. Last year Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt shot their latest film “By the Sea” there. Directed by Jolie, it appears to be a drama about an artistic couple’s fading marriage with Gozo subbing for France. CNN warns that “There are few better advertisements for a destination than a good movie,” and expects hordes of Brangelina fans to disturb the tranquility in search of the places the couple tried to rekindle their romance.

Gozo Malta

19. St. Kitts

With its neighbor and sidekick Nevis known as the decadent playground of the idle rich, St. Kitts is passing under the spell of the Evil Trinity of tourism; Big name hotel chains, golf course designers and marina builders. It is being done in the name of sustainability which may be easier to do environmentally that in preserving the spirit of a place heading to over development. When they open the world’s first edible golf course, you know the gimmicks have just begun.

St. Kitts

18. The Seychelles

National Geographic rates the beach at Anse Source d’Argent as the best in the world. One of nature’s most convincing versions of paradise. The beauty of the pink sand, the coral reef sheltered by massive granite boulders brings many beach lovers to this archipelago of more than a hundred islands in the Indian Ocean but the water rises relentlessly, the perfect beaches are eroding and its coral reef, like others around the world is being degraded. Barring some miraculous engineering innovation or divine intervention, many of the islands could be lost in the next 50 years.

Seychelles

17. The Athabasca Glacier, Canada

With its relatively convenient location in mid-Alberta between Banff and Jasper National Parks, The Athabasca Glacier attracts more tourists than any other on the continent. It is also the largest ice field between the poles. It’s a kind of frozen tributary of the massive Columbia Ice Fields. But with ice fields north of 90, as old hands call the Arctic, the Athabasca at 52 degrees north latitude is in for The Big Melt. Parks Canada estimates it’s receding up to ten feet a year. At this rate maybe too far gone for the next generation to experience.

Athabasca Glacier Canada

16. St. Helena

In its own way, St. Helena is an exotic destination. A volcanic speck of 50 square miles in the middle of the south Atlantic, it is the definition of remote, 4,000 miles east of Rio de Janeiro. Let’s face it, after Waterloo, the British were not about to exile Napoleon in Paradise. Part of its cache is that getting there is a challenge, by the Royal Mail ship St. Helena from Cape Town, Walvis Bay or Ascension Island. It’s somewhat for bird watching and its rugged terrain protects well preserved Georgian buildings. After Longwood, Napoleon’s home after 1815 (now a museum), the island’s biggest celebrity draw is Jonathon the tortoise, age 180 and going strong. The British have sunk the better part of half a billion dollars into an airport for the tiny island to open early in 2016. For that chunk of change, expect more than the usual 3,000 or so visitors soon.

St. Helena Island

15. Taj Mahal, India

Even the great frescoes of the Sistine Chapel dulled with age and the emission from centuries of candle smoke and neglect. But they were inside the walls of a building in the First World, whereas the Taj Mahal is neither. The whole point of the spectacular tribute to an Emperor’s late wife, is its pristine whiteness indicative of the purity of their love. But the air quality in India’s major cities is worse than the horrific pollution levels of Beijing. Fading to yellow or rust is not just a cosmetic downgrade it degrades its very meaning. An ornate mausoleum of white marble, The Taj Mahal is the sparkling jewel of Muslim art in India. Built in the 17th century by Emperor Shah Jahan as a memorial to his favorite wife, The Taj currently has more than 3 million visitors a year and the heat, foot traffic and toxic air are beginning to undermine the building’s structural integrity. It’s not hard to see a lengthy shutdown for restoration in the near future, not to mention banning people from going inside.

Taj Mahal

14. Dead Sea

There is the old joke that someone says he’s so old he remembers when the Dead Sea was only sick. Sadly that’s no longer just a joke. It is being sucked dry by the water-desperate countries around it who are helping themselves to the water in the River Jordan, the sea’s main source. It has shrunk by a third in size and scientists fear if the rate of attrition continues, the intensely salted water some claim has medicinal qualities, has maybe 50 years of life left.

Dead Sea

13. The Galapagos Islands

Truth be told Europeans have been abusing the Galapagos since the late 19th century when pirates used it as a base to launch their raids. Darwin didn’t arrive until 1835 to begin on what would become The Origin of the Species 25 years later. Now there are pages of tours echoing the name of his ship The Beagle. The islands are threatened by too many people. Too many insensitive people acting reprehensibly to degrade this natural treasure to take the greatest selfies and poach plants and animals (not necessarily at the same time.) The prognosis is much better than many other sites however because the ecosystem, while delicate, can still be saved by limiting if not stopping altogether, the onslaught of tourists. So if it’s on your bucket list…tread lightly.

Galapagos Islands

12. Glacier National Park Montana

In fact, anything with the word “Glacier’ in its name or title may be at risk, barring some miraculous reversal in climate change, the effects are well documented. They are living on borrowed time, the more temperate the climate the more critical the patient. The number of glaciers in the stunningly beautiful Glacier National Park on the Montana-Canada border has shrunk by 75% in the last century. Pessimistic estimates say the glaciers and the ecosystem that depends on them could be gone by 2030. The good news if you’re into dark humor; the surfing in Montana is about to improve dramatically.

Glacier Bay National Park Montana

11. South Australia

One of those areas facing the climate change double whammy, coastal flooding and interior desertification the Australian government has studied and published many daunting studies on the effects. Rising sea levels will threaten hundreds of miles of beaches and the lovely city of Adelaide will be put at risk. The soaring temperatures and absence of rain in the interior will challenge some of the most renowned wine growing regions in the world, including the Barossa and Clare Valleys. While the region accounts for only 7% of Australia’s population, it is also responsible for half of the $1.3 billion in wine exports. Unless you are entertained somehow by catastrophic flooding and drought, best to go soon.

McLaren Vale, South Australia

10. Greek Islands

There are 6,000 islands from Aegina to Zaforas in the Ionian and Aegean seas off the Greek coast. Only 227 are inhabited and only 50 have airports. Traveling between them has always been a question of taking leisurely ferries with shall we say occasionally regular schedules. Until now after a Greek airline has announced to connect another 100 by seaplane. As always accessibility is a mixed blessing. The islands of Crete, Skyros and Pelion are first on the list with more to come as early as year’s end. Book accordingly. Unless you like crowded beaches, then this is your lucky year.

Aigiali village in Amorgos island in Greece

9. Victoria Falls, Zimbabwe/Zambia

The famous falls are twice the height of Niagara with a fraction of the tourists. At least until the new Victoria Falls International Airport, on the Zimbabwe/Zambia, border opens in the fall of 2015. It’s being built to handle what pilots call “Heavy Metal”, wide body A340’s and Boeing 777’s and their human cargo. It will be a huge boost for the tourism sector in the long-suffering country. The five regional airlines that used the old airport will be joined by British British Airways, Qatar Airways, Etihad, Emirates, and Kenya Airways, just to start.

Victoria Falls Zimbabwe

8. St. Vincent and the Grenadines, Caribbean

An idyllic place. Everything you wish for in a Caribbean destination. And less, without the crowds, partiers and such. Beaches rank among the best in the world, coral reefs provide diving that’s to die for, it’s care free relaxation in a setting almost too beautiful to be true. But it’s always been a bit of a schlep to get there by connecting flight. The new $250,000,000 Argyle International Airport , will come with direct flights to North American and European cities increasing capacity by at least 400%. Plus it is upgrading its port infrastructure to bring in more cruise ships whose environmental record has been somewhere between bad and wretched. The good news for would-be visitors is that the airport is behind schedule for those who would like to have the island experience before it gets paved and up go the condos.

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

7. Nicaragua

Lake Nicaragua is a scenic, unspoiled place with coastal towns lost to time and lots of fishing spots locals love. It has been fast-tracked to the environmental critical list by a crazy ambitious $50 billion Chinese-backed project to build a canal three times the length of the Panama Canal from the Pacific to the Caribbean Sea and hence the Atlantic, in the process trampling through prized lakes, wetlands, coral reefs and any number of delicate ecosystems in Central America and the Caribbean. The Nicaraguan Academy of Sciences warns “this canal would create an environmental disaster in Nicaragua and beyond. Tourist visits have soared since the construction started.

Lake Nicaragua

6. Papua New Guinea

There is an automatic exoticism to the south Pacific and in the case of Papua New Guinea, it’s enhanced by its status as one of the last truly unexplored places on earth. The government has expressed a “wish” to maintain the rarely seen villages as the basis for its society. It’s a nice gesture, but at the same time they’re expanding the almost non-existent tourism infrastructure starting with cruise ships and with them a fading chance to experience a land not far removed from first contact.

Amy Nichole Harris / Shutterstock.com
Amy Nichole Harris / Shutterstock.com

5. The Alps, Europe

The mighty Alps are facing an uphill battle they can’t win. The evidence is incremental but unmistakable. The temperature, even on peaks over 10,000 feet has been steadily rising. The elevation at which snow falls and accumulates is falling. Towns and cities dependent on skiing for their livelihoods are taking strong measures to lower local CO2 emissions, but climate change scientists say the effects of climate change could hit hard by 2040. So maybe the problem will be solved by then, it still leaves you at least 25 years to book, but after that forget the skies and take hiking boots and sunblock.

French Alps

4. Venice, Italy

Like the famous writer Mark Twain, reports of the death of Venice have been greatly exaggerated. The magical kingdom of canals and Renaissance masterpieces has been written off many times before. But the severe flooding it has long suffered has become deeper and more chronic. When you can stop on your way to St. Mark’s and, bend down and catch fish with your bare hands, the fat lady may not be singing but is definitely warming up. The prognosis: the only people to see Venice past the 22nd century are likely scuba divers and snorkelers. However, the city has miraculously hung tough before. It may not be clear just how just yet, but surely no expense will be spared to save one of the greatest treasures on the planet.

Venice Italy Lagoons

3. Great Barrier Reef, Australia

Another long running natural disaster that could have been easily mitigated by sustainable practices. The fabulous reef has been assaulted not only by climate change but by human stupidity. Higher water temperatures and its older foes of pollution and acidification from ever rising carbon dioxide emissions are killing off the corals at an alarming rate. More recent threats are damage caused by the development of Australian ports to export coal to China, thereby contributing to more CO2, hence more damage to the reef and its $4 billion in tourist income. A whole new enemy has emerged as well in industrial overfishing which doesn’t directly damage reefs around the world, but destroys the fish stocks that are part of its ecosystem. The wonderful reef in Belize is facing the same threat of death by coral bleaching.

Great Barrier Reef Fish

2. Cuba

Oh the irony. According to CNN, the son of Che Guevara, the iconic Marxist guerrilla leader, has turned out to be quite the entrepreneur, launching a motorcycle tour company for the biking crowd to see the island from behind their choppers. With the easing of American travel restrictions, the fabric of the island is in for rapid change for the less impoverished though not necessarily better. Not to revel in other’s poverty but the anachronism of the island frozen in a time warp by antiquated Communist central planning was part of the charm, like the famous 1950’s vintage vehicles constantly repaired and rebuilt out of economic necessity. The wonderful beaches are already popular and if there are bikers, the massive cruise ships won’t be far behind. Hemingway’s Havana is already on borrowed time.

Kamira / Shutterstock.com
Kamira / Shutterstock.com

1. Antarctica

Expect to see more headlines like this one from the BBC: “Should tourists be banned from Antarctica?” It’s feared that Antarctica is shedding up to 160 billion tons of ice annually and rising. The biggest threat to the ice cap is warming temperatures, not humans. Less than 40,000 people visit every year and only a quarter of them actually go ashore. Tour companies abide by strict international guidelines to limit human impact but those guidelines are voluntary. That human impact may be minimal, but any additional pressure on an increasingly vulnerable ecosystem is critical. There will be many more calls for restrictions to follow the BBC’s warnings. It won’t disappear in a century but trips to see it may be extinct long before.

Antarctica

The Top Countries You Can Visit For Less Than $50 a Day

With more people traveling around the world, countries are getting even more expensive to visit. Despite popular beliefs, it is possible to pick the right place where you can stretch your dollar for days, even weeks. Doing your research, opting for public transportation, and eating in local spots will all go a long way to helping you stick to your budget.

10. Thailand

Despite its popularity, Thailand has remained one of the cheapest countries to visit over the years. The north side of the country is definitely cheaper than Bangkok and the islands but you will be hard-pressed to spend more than $50 a day. Rooms go for about $6-10 per day and a meal from a local restaurant will run you $5. The picture-perfect islands are even a bargain here, provided you don’t want to stay in a luxury resort. Local buses are cheap, beers are cheap and activities and sightseeing rarely runs you over $15. It is no wonder Thailand remains a hugely popular destination for budget travelers and although many continue to flock here, there is still plenty to explore without being engulfed in the crowds.

Phang Nga Bay Thailand

9. Greece

Greece has always been a bit of a budget traveler’s paradise when it comes to Europe. The fall of the economy in Greece has only made it more affordable to visit. Whether you are choosing to visit one of the islands or the mainland, there are bargains to be found. In the past few years, tourism has actually been on the decline of this beautiful country and has dragged the low prices even lower. Street vendors will sell you fresh delicious gyros for under $3 where a huge lamb meal complete with local alcohol might run you $10. Hotels and rooms can be as cheap as $20 a night and take local buses to save even more. Stay away from the touristy islands to save on accommodations and meals and choose to visit the roads less traveled.

Athens, Greece

8. Peru

Peru is one of South America’s liveliest and friendliest countries and it just so happens to be one of the cheapest to travel in. Although most travelers come here for the Inca trail, Peru is absolutely loaded with other things to see and do. Stay in a hostel for around $10 or splurge for a guesthouse that will run you $25 a night. Sit down meals are rarely over $5 and the local intracity buses cost around $1. What costs the most in this country are the activities you do. Book last minute specials when you arrive in Peru to visit Machu Picchu at half price or explore other ruins of Inca destinations for less. Hit the deserted white sand beaches, sail the Amazon and explore a beautiful country full of happy and funny people.

Lima Peru

7. Romania

Romania is the perfect country to experience old-world charm at half the price. Although many people associate this country as a decrepit ex-Communist nation, Romania is actually full of awesome things to discover. This Eastern European country offers medieval villages, castles and beautiful countryside. The time to travel here is holiday season which is the low season where you can stay for even cheaper. Expect to pay around $10 for a room and $5 for most meals. Entrance to the museums and galleries are quite cheap at $5-10 and makes for a perfect way to explore the cities. Try to stick to the smaller towns here as the touristy ones can charge double or triple for rooms and meals. If you have always wanted to explore Europe but found the price point to be high, try hitting up Romania for the ultimate European adventure.

Radu Bercan / Shutterstock.com
Radu Bercan / Shutterstock.com

6. Portugal

The cheapest place to visit in Western Europe is the beautiful and lively country of Portugal. Beaches, wine country, historical cities, and towering cliffs make it an exciting place to discover. Dorm beds can be found for about $20 a night and an even cheaper option is to camp as this country is home to spotless campgrounds located right on the beach. Meals can be a bit pricey and the bigger cities such as Lisbon often offer the most affordable food choices. Lisbon also happens to be one of the most affordable cities to stay in a five-star hotel, just in case you feel like splurging for a night. Take advantage of the free admission days that most cities offer with access to museums and galleries, ride the cheap and efficient public transit systems and enjoy this wonderful country at an extremely low price.

Porto Santo, Portugal

5. Cambodia

Cambodia is one of the cheapest countries on this list to visit and much like its neighboring country of Thailand it offers rich history, great cuisine, and a good nightlife.  This country is also less developed and less explored and therefore comes in even cheaper than Thailand. A fully private room in a typical hostel with air conditioning will only cost you about $8 a night where a typical hotel room with A/C will only run you $15-20. Food is even cheaper, most costing $2 for local food and $6-8 for a more typical Western meal. Even exploring the jungles, the cities, and the ruins won’t cost you a lot. With some of the nicest people around and raw rugged beauty at every turn, it is easy to understand why travelers often call this country their favorite. You will be hard-pressed to spend $50 a day here unless you want to live like a king.

Cambodia Floating Market Seller

4. Nicaragua

It’s the largest country in Central America but one of the least discovered and therefore extremely cheap to travel in. That is until it becomes more popular like neighboring Costa Rica. For now, though it is easy to make your way through the country experiencing the lively people, colorful towns, surfing, wildlife and volcano trekking that will keep you entertained for weeks and all for the cost of less than $50 a day. Sleep in a hammock for $5 or splurge for a room with a bathroom for $20. Food costs just mere dollars whether you are eating from a street vendor or local restaurant. Getting around is cheap and easy, either by using local buses or hopping in the back of a local truck, an ever-popular choice with locals and visitors alike. Stay away from the touristy area of San Juan del Sur as prices tend to be inflated and there are more beautiful beaches and jungles to the north.

Nicaragua

3. Indonesia

This beautiful chain of islands looks to be expensive with its stunning blue waters and silky sands. But don’t let the pictures fool you. If you can get away from the more touristy places it is actually quite affordable to travel within the country. In fact, it’s the plane ticket to get here that costs so much. The touristy south near Ubud and Kuta are where visitors will want to avoid, as they are full of dirty beaches and overpriced resorts. Head to the rather unexplored areas instead and it is easy to find a room in a hostel or guest house for less than $4 a night. Street food will only cost you a couple of dollars where a restaurant meal may run you $6. For well under $50 a day you will find rice terraces, black and white sand beaches, volcanoes, food markets, and jungles.

Mount Bromo, Indonesia

2. India

India is extremely cheap to travel to and instead of asking how one should survive on $50 a day most people ask how they can do it on $20 a day. Yes, it is possible. Local Indian vegetarian food is the way to stick on budget with the occasional splurge on meat and you can bank on spending no more than $10 a day total on food. Rooms can be found for about $5 a night. Take rickshaws instead of taxis and local buses. The flight to India is definitely the most expensive part about traveling here but once you have arrived, everything else is truly a bargain. With the exchange rate being as it is, changing dollars into rupees is advantageous for the traveler and they are seeing 50% more money to travel with, thus making India one of the best bargain countries on this list.

India Market

1. Turkey

Turkey is a unique mix of eastern and western culture which visitors should plan on spending at least a few weeks discovering. Luckily it is easy to live on much less than $50 a day here and despite popular beliefs, it’s actually not that expensive to reach. Istanbul happens to be one of the handfuls of cities around the world where airfare bargains are the norm. Hostels will be your most expensive part costing about $20 a night but the quality is high and often includes a wonderful breakfast. Typical food such as kebabs and shawarmas will only cost you about $2. The good news is the buses run frequently and are cheap, offering the chance to explore a lot of this country. Turkey offers spectacular landscapes, delicious food, fantastic sights and plenty of things to do all for the mere price of $50 a day.

Istanbul, Turkey

A Global Soup Tour: 10 Fall Favorites From Around the World

There’s nothing more comforting than a steaming bowl of soup on a chilly day, so as the seasons change in the northern hemisphere and the air starts to exhibit that nip we know means that winter is coming, we start to search for warmth anyway we can. For many, soup isn’t just a seasonal favorite but rather a go to meal any time of year, and each country/region/cuisine has their own local specialties. Chowders are notorious to the American East coast while in India you’ll find spice-filled delights like Mulligatawny and Rasam, so take a global tour this Fall without having to leave the comfort of your own home with these international soups that are guaranteed to warm and delight.

10. Bouillabaisse -France

If you’re looking for an impressive soup to serve to company or you’re crazy about seafood, this French soup is sure to satisfy. Bouillabaisse originates from the city of Marseille, France where fishermen would make this seafood stew using the left over fish they were unable to sell to markets or restaurants. The dish blends several types of local fish and shellfish such as mussels and crabs with fish stock and a selection of Provençal herbs and spices.

Bouillabaisse

9. Caldo Verde -Portugal

This popular type of Portuguese soup combines potatoes, kale, olive oil and salt and will not only warm you but also fill you up on those cold Autumn evenings. Often, sausage or ham hock is added to the soup at the end of cooking to make it an even more filling meal. In Portugal, you’ll find this soup typically served during celebrations such as birthdays, weddings and festivals like the Festival of St. John of Porto.

Caldo Verde

8. Cullen Skink -Scotland

This thick Scottish soup is filled with smoked haddock, potatoes and onions along with milk or cream for a hearty satisfying soup that really ‘sticks to your ribs’. Cullen Skink originated in the town of Cullen in Moray Scotland but the dish is now a popular everyday dish throughout the northeast of the country. This soup is considered more assertive than an American fish chowder and heartier than a French bisque.

Cullen Skink (2)

7. Fasolada -Greece

Fasolada is a traditional Greek bean soup that’s often called the “national food of the Greeks”. While recipes vary widely, the original version of ancient Greece blended dried white beans, olive oil and grains with vegetables like carrot, celery and onions and was served as an offering to the Greek God Apollo during the Pyanopsia festival in Athens.

Fasolada

6. Harira -Morocco

Harira is a popular tomato based soup from Morocco and Algeria where the dish is commonly eaten as a starter before a meal or as a light snack. The main components of Harira are tomatoes, lentils, chickpeas, onions, rice, meat (usually lamb or beef) and flour for thickening. Herbs and spices are also added and vary depending on region but typically they include parsley, coriander, saffron, ginger, pepper, turmeric and cumin.

Harira

5. Mulligatawny -India

Mulligatawny may be an English spin on an Indian tradition but it’s still delicious none the less! The funny sounding name comes from the Tamil words mullaga and thanni which translate to ‘pepper-water’. Today’s version of this soup typically consists of chicken broth, curry powder, nutmeg and blended lentils and vegetables. The original Indian dish this soup was based on wasn’t actually a soup at all, but rather a sauce that was served over rice.

Mulligatawny

4. Tom Yum -Thailand

This traditional Thai hot and sour soup is a favorite not only in Thailand but also in Laos and throughout other neighboring countries. The soups distinct base is made from stock that’s simmered with fragrant herbs and spices like lemongrass, kaffir lime, galangal, fish sauce and fresh chilies. Vegetables and meats are added and very depending on region and recipe but commonly you’ll find chicken, beef, pork and shrimp.

Tom Yum

Laksa -Malaysia

Laksa is a spicy noddle soup popular in the Peranakan style of cuisine which is a blend of both Chinese and Malay cuisines. The popular curry Laksa combines a rich broth of curry spices and coconut milk with rice or laksa noodles, vegetables and meat such as chicken, fish, prawns or bean curd puff. This satisfying noodle soup is popular in Malaysia but variants are also found throughout Singapore, Indonesia and southern Thailand.

Laksa

2. Solyanka -Russia

Russia is known for hearty food and this popular spicy-sour soup is no exception. While there are 3 basic types of Solyanka, all of them contain pickled cucumbers with brine, cabbage and mushrooms. Meat Solyanka adds beef, ham, sausage or chicken along with tomatoes, onions, olives, capers, allspice, parsley and dill, while mushroom Solyanka sees layers of mushrooms and cabbage alternated and topped with grated lemon zest, breadcrumbs and butter before the soup is baked.

Solyanka

1. Clam Chowder -USA

Clam Chowder is an east coast favorite and one of the most popular soups in America. The New England clam chowder is a milk or cream based type that is usually a little thicker than other regional varieties and is usually topped or thickened with oyster crackers, a regional specialty. Diced potato, bacon, onion and celery are added to the clams and simmered until tender. In the New England region, adding tomatoes to chowder is frowned upon and in 1939, a bill was introduced to Maine legislature making tomatoes in clam chowder illegal.

Clam Chowder