The 24 Newest UNESCO World Heritage Sites

The ancient city of Ephesus in Turkey and the Blue and John Crow Mountains in Jamaica are just two of the 24 newly inscribed World Heritage sites approved by the 39th UNESCO committee in Bonn, Germany recently.  From ancient, archaeological sites to complex industrial systems and cultural landscapes, the 2015 list provides no shortage of exciting and intriguing travel ideas for the year, sure to peak even the most veteran travelers’ interests.

1. Aqueduct of Padre Tembleque Hydraulic System – Mexico

Constructed in the 16th century and located on the Central Mexican Plateau, this aqueduct was built with support from local indigenous communities.  Along with tanks, bridges and a water catchment area, this heritage canal system has the “highest single-level arcade ever built in an aqueduct”.

Photo by: UNESCO/Espacio de la Imagen/Edgar Valtiago
Photo by: UNESCO/Espacio de la Imagen/Edgar Valtiago

2. Arab-Norman Palermo and the Cathedral Churches of Cefalú and Monreale – Italy

The nine structures included in this Arab-Norman Palermo are comprised of two palaces, three churches, a cathedral, a bridge, the Cefalù cathedral and the Monreale cathedral.  Located on the northern coast of Sicily, this heritage site, dating from the 12th century, depicts the relationships between the Western, Islamic and Byzantine cultures that eventually led to new spatial, structural and decorative concepts.

Arab-Norman Palermo and the Cathedral Churches of Cefalú and Monreale

3. Baekje Historic Areas – Republic of Korea

The Busosanseong Fortress and the royal palace at Wanggung-ri are among the eight archaeological sites that make up the Baekje Historic Areas.  Found in the mid-west region of the Republic of Korea, these sites, dating from 475 to 660 CE, are an accurate representation of the Baekje Kingdom, a time when the ancient kingdoms in Korea, China and Japan were sharing and exchanging thoughts and ideas on contemporary issues such as artistry, religion and technology.

Gongsanseong fortress Korea

4. Baptism Site “Bethany Beyond the Jordan” (Al-Maghtas) – Jordan

This heritage site, located on the eastern bank of the River Jordan, is believed to be the spot where Jesus of Nazareth was baptized by John the Baptist.  With multiple church and monastery remains, this archaeological site is a place of Christian pilgrimage and a testament to the Roman and Byzantine religious influence in the area.

Bethany Beyond the Jordan

5. Champagne Hillsides, Houses and Cellars – France

Already one of the most popular wine regions in the world, the Champagne Hillsides were given World Heritage designation due to its historical importance in the production of sparkling wines.  Since the early 17th century, these historic vineyards have understood the value of illustrating the process of champagne production and have become a household name in the wine and tourism industry.

Champagne hillsides france

6. Christiansfeld, a Moravian Church Settlement – Denmark

This town, a planned settlement of the Moravian Church, was intended to represent the Protestant urban ideal and so was constructed in its entirety around a central Church square.  Founded in 1773 and still used today by a community of the Moravian Church, this town is complete with simple and homogenous architecture, such as its yellow brick buildings with red tile roofs.

Christiansfeld denmark

7. Climats, terroirs of Burgundy – France

These delimited vineyard parcels, found south of Dijon, are an excellent representation of the ancient cultivation and production methods in place since the High Middle Ages.  Due to human cultivation and natural conditions, these parcels, located on the slopes of the Côte de Nuits and the Côte de Beaune, are now identified by the wine they produced.

Château du Clos de Vougeot Burgundy France

8. Cultural Landscape of Maymand – Iran (Islamic Republic of)

This heritage site of Maymand is a self-contained area located in the southern part of Iran’s central mountains.  UNESCO designated this area a heritage site because of the semi-nomadic pastoralists who live with their animals on mountain pastures, and relocate depending on the seasons.  The nomads live low in the valley during the winter months in unique cave dwellings, and live in temporary settlements higher up on the mountain during the spring and autumn months.

Photo by: Ngjyra
Photo by: Ngjyra

9. Diyarbakir Fortress and Hevsel Gardens Cultural Landscape – Turkey

Situated in the aptly-named Fertile Crescent, this city and its surrounding landscape has been given an World Heritage designation due to it being an important center throughout different time periods, from the Hellenistic period, to the Ottoman times and into the present.  The fortified city of Diyarbakir, along with the Hevsel Gardens, is comprised of an inner castle,  a 5.8 kilometer long wall, towers, gates, 63 inscriptions all from different periods and is located on the Upper Tigres River Basin.

Diyarbakir Fortress Turkey

10. Ephesus – Turkey

This World Heritage Site has long since drawn Pilgrims from all around the Mediterranean.  The ancient city of Ephesus, featuring successive Hellenistic and Roman settlements, is comprised of many excavated monuments and historical sites, and is a great example of a Roman port city.

Ephesus Turkey

11. Fray Bentos Cultural-Industrial Landscape – Uruguay

West of the town of Fray Bentos and situated on the Uruguay River, this site was built in order to process the meat that was produced on the nearby prairies.  This was given World Heritage status due to its excellent illustration on the process of meat production; its crucial location, industrial and residential buildings and social institutions ensure that this site of meat production was known on a global scale.

Matyas Rehak / Shutterstock.com
Matyas Rehak / Shutterstock.com

12. Great Burkhan Khaldun Mountain and its surrounding sacred landscape – Mongolia

Having long been a site of ancient shamanic and Buddhist practices, the Burkhan Khaldun, situated in the central part of the Khentii mountain chain in the north-east part of the country, has been a place of worship of the sacred mountains, rivers and ovoo-s (shamanic rock cairns) that make up the landscape.  Believed to be the place of Genghis Khan’s birth and burial, this site is crucial to the unification of the Mongol people and to the mountain worship prevalent in their culture.

mountain mongolia

13. Necropolis of Beth She’arim: A Landmark of Jewish Renewal – Israel

The series of catacombs that make up this heritage site are an important collection of Greek, Aramaic and Hebrew artworks and inscriptions.  Southeast of the city of Haifa, Beth She’arim was the primary Jewish burial place outside of Jerusalem and is an important testimony to ancient Judaism and to the Jewish renewal after 135 CE.

Beth She’arim Israel

14. Rjukan–Notodden Industrial Heritage Site – Norway

Using the natural mountainous landscape to its advantage, the Norsk-Hydro Company manufactured artificial fertilizer from nitrogen in the air and became an example of a new global industry in the early 20th century. The hydroelectric power plants and transport systems and towns included at the Rjukan-Notodden site show how this company used its industry, in combination with nature, to meet the Western world’s increasing demand for agricultural production.

Rjukan-Notodden Norway

15. Rock Art in the Hail Region of Saudi Arabia – Saudi Arabia

Petroglyphs and inscriptions on the rock face of this heritage site offer a glimpse into the passages of the ancient Arab populations across the Great Narfoud Desert.  These preserved depictions of human and animal figures show 10,000 years of history found in this great desert landscape in Saudi Arabia.

Photo by: saudi-archaeology
Photo by: saudi-archaeology

16. San Antonio Missions – United States of America

A great source of pride for Texans now and past are the five frontier mission complexes that make up this newly designated World Heritage site located in southern Texas.  Built by Franciscan missionaries in the 18th century, the San Antonio Missions are symbols of Spain’s colonization of the region and are the site of the historic 1836 Battle of the Alamo.

San Antonio Missions Conception

17. Singapore Botanical Gardens – Singapore

Used for both conservation and education, the Singapore Botanical Gardens, built in 1859, include many historical features that illustrate the development of the garden and its importance as a site for science and research.

Singapore Botanical Gardens

18. Sites of Japan’s Meiji Industrial Revolution: Iron and Steel, Shipbuilding and Coal Mining – Japan

Eleven properties make up this heritage site, situated in the southwest of Japan.  This site depicts the time in Japanese history when the country actively sought technology from both Europe and America and is considered the first successful transfer of Western industrialization to a non-Western nation.

Nirayama Reverbatory Furnaces Japan

19. Speicherstadt and Kontorhaus District with Chilehaus – Germany

Built on a narrow island in the Elbe River from 1885 to 1927 and partially rebuilt from 1949 to 1967, these two urban areas, centrally located in the port city of Hamburg, are examples of the effects of rapid international trade in the 19th and 20th centuries.  These two areas together are one of the largest historic ensembles of port warehouses in the world.

Speicherstadt Germany

20. Susa – Iran (Islamic Republic of)

These architectural monuments, depicting the nearly extinct Elamite, Persian and Parthian cultural traditions, are comprised of administrative, residential and palatial structures excavated in the south-west of Iran.  These archaeological sites illustrate settlements found in the area from the late 5th millennium BCE to the 13th century CE, successively.

Susa Iran

21. The Forth Bridge – United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

The largest multi-span cantilever bridge, located across the estuary of the Forth River in Scotland, has earned World Heritage designation from UNESCO due to its innovative use of bridge design and construction.

The Forth Bridge UK

22. The Par Force Hunting Landscape in North Zealand – Denmark

The two hunting forests of Store Dyrehave and Gribskov, along with the hunting park of Jaegersborg Hegn/Jaegersborg Dyrehave, where Danish kings hunted with hounds until the end of the 16th century, have reached World Heritage status due to its demonstration of Baroque landscaping principles.

Photo by: .bastian (Flickr) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Photo by: .bastian (Flickr) [CC BY-SA 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

23. Tusi Sites- China

From the Yuan and Ming periods of Chinese civilization, the Tusi Sites depict the tribal domains whose chiefs were elected based on the Tusi system.  This system, in place from the 13th to the 20th century, rose in prominence due to its unification of national administration and its allowance of customs and culture from ethnic minorities.

Photo by: photo.navi
Photo by: photo.navi

24. Blue and John Crow Mountains – Jamaica

Jamaica’s first World Heritage designation is the unique and historically important mountainous region situated in the south-east of Jamaica.  Not only does this site contain many of the endemic plant species present in the Caribbean Islands, but it also provided refuge for both the indigenous Tainos and escaped African slaves known as Maroons.  Due to the isolated nature of these mountains, the refugees managed to resist the European colonial system, and in doing so, developed spiritual connections with the mountains that are still felt today.

Blue Mountains Jamaica

12 Modern Day Ruins of the World

Aristotle once said “Time crumbles things”, he wasn’t wrong.
People travel halfway around the world to see the Colosseum, the pyramids in Egypt or the Great Wall of China. We ponder what people were like, what parallels connect them to us, what changes and remains the same. Like time travelers we can visit a more recent, almost familiar past, full of echoes from not too distant generations that have walked away, leaving their ghosts behind. The great team at EscapeHere has assembled a list of provoking modern-day ruins, I hope they capture your imagination like they did mine.

12. The Ryugyong Hotel

If feels almost too easy to list this as a modern day ruin, but this North Korean hotel has been one of the biggest examples of architectural failure in the last century (and probably this one too). Developed as some sort of state pants-envy indicator for power and progress for the peninsula dictatorship, the Ryugyong Hotel was unable to finish the initial construction schedule when the government simply ran out of money (while their people starved).

Work started on the hotel in 1987 and stopped in 1992, the vulgar pyramid spire sat dormant and dominant on the Pyongyang skyline for sixteen years. Although the structure was “topped out” no windows or fixtures have graced the structure until just recently as construction briefly resumed in 2008. North Korea pledged that the hotel would be finished by 2012 to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the birth of the “Eternal President”, Kim Il-sung. However, the celebration took place without a shiny new hotel as the work stopped because of political instability.

Viktoria Gaman / Shutterstock.com
Viktoria Gaman / Shutterstock.com

11. The Book Tower

The Book Tower was at one point the tallest building in Detroit, and at 38 stories (not including two basement levels) remains one of the largest skyscrapers in the United States that has avoided demolition and renovation. The Book Tower is unique among the Detroit skyline with its awkward external fire escape, naked sculptures and the storybook crown, the Renaissance style somehow seems out of place in the town that Ford built.

J. Burgess Book Jr. and his brothers were on a mission to turn Detroit’s Washington Avenue into a destination that rivaled New York’s Fifth Avenue, with upscale culture and shopping. Their opening salvo in this endeavor was the Book Tower in 1917. The building was the center of downtown activity until the 1960s when it began its decline with the rest of the city. On January 5, 2009, the last remaining holdout tenant, Bookies Tavern, moved on to a newer location downtown.

Book Tower Detroit

10. Forbidden Discovery Island

Feel adventurous enough to brave waters rumored to be inhabited by alligators and potentially deadly nervous system-attacking bacteria? That’s probably the only way to see this next modern ruin first hand. If you were to make a clandestine trip deep into the interior of the Florida Walt Disney World property and swim, dingy, or scuba to the ominous island in the middle of Bay Lake, you will find the remains of Discovery Island; The Magic Kingdom’s former wildlife sanctuary that went wrong.

Walt Disney purchased the island in 1965 and opened (what was then called) Treasure Island here in 1974. The wildlife sanctuary hosted the largest colony of Scarlet Ibises in the U.S., as well as five Galapagos tortoises, flamingos, lemurs, swans, and brown pelicans. In 1999, the attraction was closed for unspecified reasons (but speculation abounds), and the abandoned attractions can still be seen from Disney’s Contemporary Resort and the Fort Wilderness Resort and Campground.

Photo by: imgkid.com
Photo by: imgkid.com

9. Six Flags Jazzland

Just off Interstate 10, on the eastern side of New Orleans sits the home of the now silent but still-standing Cajun attractions like the Zydeco Scream and the Muskrat Scrambler. Jazzland opened its doors as a small amusement park featuring the standard rickety wooden roller coaster, log flume, and other soak-you-with-carnival-water attractions in 2000, two years later the awesome Six Flags corporation bought the joint, upgraded it with various fun and safety additions and marketed it with Mr. Six (the dancing old guy). They had great plans on a water park to be included in 2005, which would have been included in the park admission.

Those plans however were thwarted when Hurricane Katrina devastated New Orleans and flooded the park removing all amusement here since. Most of New Orleans has been rebuilt, which is a testament to the vibrant community that lives there, but Jazzland remains, untouched since the storm. As of today you can still see the remnants of the park in its former glory, and some people trespass to capture this unique surreal landscape. If you want to see what remains, head to the Big Easy soon as talks are in place to turn this former fun-town into an outdoor mall.

Photo by: Frank Aymami
Photo by: Frank Aymami

8. The Second-Largest Man-Made Hole in the History of the World (and ghost town)

Deep in Siberia, there exists an open-pit diamond mine reaching 1,722 feet deep and 3,900 feet wide that sits beside the town of Mirny; a town that sits just below the Arctic Circle (bring extra socks). Founded in 1955, there exists today a town that could hold 3500 mine workers and their families (not to mention the people working in other industries needed to make a town run) which sits almost entirely perfectly preserved and empty today.

The people that lived here had to endure some of the harshest winters imaginable, which would typically last up to 7 months at a time, punctuated by short “summers” that turned the ground to slush. It was so cold that even oil froze, rubber automotive tires would shatter, and workers had to routinely use jet engines to thaw the permafrost so they could dig. That being said, the town is generally off limits to outsiders without a special permit but visiting this perfectly preserved modern ruin is not unheard of as universities host modern archaeology tours.

Mirny Town

7. Kolmanskop

If you ever find yourself in Namibia, just outside of the port town of Lüderitz, take some time to visit the ghost town that diamonds built. Kolmanskop is Afrikkans for Coleman’s hill, and the place got this name simply because a transport driver named Johnny Coleman abandoned his ox wagon here, continuing the tradition of “naming places where your rig stops” that has taken place the world over (looking at you, Eyebrow, Saskatchewan). In 1908, when laying some train tracks, some poor schmo found a diamond and showed it to his German Boss, who in turn told some German government official, who in turn named the area Sperrgebiet, or loosely translated “wow this place is worth a lot of money so nobody can come here but us!”.

Like every boomtown, the initial residents were filthy-rich and built themselves a tiny paradise full of super opulent stuff, including infrastructure like ballrooms, a hospital, power station, school, sports hall, casino, ice factory (for their fancy drinks) and the first x-ray station in the Southern Hemisphere. The town declined after the diamonds ran out and today, all that’s left are the incredibly well engineered houses that are slowly being swallowed up by the desert sands once again. To travel to this town you will need to get permission from the Namibian government through their special permit program.

Kolmanskop Namibia

6. Fordlândia

Deep in the Amazon rainforest there sits an abandoned, prefabricated industrial town that was established in 1928 by the industrialist Henry Ford. Ford controlled almost all of the raw materials that went into his automobiles, save for the rubber in the tires, which at that time was monopolized by the British Malay Peninsula. He negotiated a deal with the Brazilian government for a parcel of land the size of a small state, and created a plantation settlement there in exchange for 9% of the profits gained. The project was ultimately a total failure and Henry Ford never actually visited his now abandoned town.

The structures of Fordlândia have been left empty for the decades following the towns’ demise. The only way to reach the site is by boats, which leave the nearby town Santarém from the Praça Tiradentes port Monday to Saturday at 4PM and on Sunday at 2PM. The overnight trip takes 12 hours and costs about $45, arriving early the next morning. You can hang your hammock on the dock until it is light enough to explore the remains of this historical fiasco.

Photo by: Latin America Bureau
Photo by: Latin America Bureau

5. Ellis Island

More than 40% of all US citizens can trace at least one of their ancestors to Ellis Island, being the primary immigration gateway from 1892 to 1954. Located in the Upper New York Bay, east of Liberty State Park and north of Liberty Island, Ellis Island is now a huge decaying complex, featuring what used to be a state of the art hospital center with laboratories, psychopathic ward, power station, laundry building and dormitories. Most of the island is closed to the general public and has been uninhabited for almost 70 years only guarded by patrols of the United States Park Police.

Travel to Ellis Island is limited to the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, restored in the 1980s, this main immigration processing building reopened as a facility to chronicle Ellis Island’s role in American immigration history. Due to the recent destruction from Hurricane Sandy, a few parts of the historic main building and museum are closed, but are due to reopen soon.

Ellis Island

4. A.M.A.R.C.

Close to Tucson, Arizona is AMARC; the Aerospace Maintenance And Regeneration Center. This is the place where the U.S. Air Force stores all of its old planes until needed again, scrapped for parts, or sold to foreign and civilian interests. It’s part of the Air Force’s sales pitch that for whatever aircraft they sell, they will always have spare parts. If you are a military history geek like me, you would have probably had your interest piqued when this location was showcased in movies like Transformers; Revenge of the Fallen, and Harley Davidson and the Marlboro man.

Today there are about 4,000 planes in storage, with the lion’s share of them from the Vietnam War; this location is a testament to man’s ingenuity and creativity. This airplane graveyard speaks to my inner ten year old, full of excitement and mystery. Regular civilians are disallowed from wandering around the aircraft, but you can partake in a bus tour around the facility hosted by the Pima Air Museum, learn more at the official AMARC homepage.

AMARC Tucson
Photo By: U.S. Navy /Photographer’s Mate 3rd Class Shannon R. Smith. [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

3. Hashima Island

Hashima Island, also known as BattleShip Island is an abandoned island 15 kilometers off the coast of Japan. The Island is known for its abandoned apartment buildings and community infrastructure surrounded by a substantial sea wall (it was even featured in the recent James Bond movie, Skyfall). The abandoned island-city was known for its undersea coal mines and at its peak housed over 5000 residents when it closed in 1974, most of the people left the city with only the clothes on their back and suitcases they could carry shortly afterward.

After the turn of the Millennium, the island has become a favorite destination for ruin enthusiasts, and travel was officially been reopened for limited tourism in 2009. Increased popularity and media exposure to the island has caused the Japanese Government to declare the island a site of industrial heritage, and to petition that Hashima be included as a UNESCO World Heritage site.

Hashima Island

2. El Caminito del Rey

This site is also known as “The King’s Little Path” and “The Walk of Death” and is located in the Gaitanes Gorge in the western portion of the Baetic Mountains of Spain with walls reaching as high as 700 meters and narrowing to 10 meters. The Gorge itself is fascinating with its sandstone formations, fossilized whale remains and eroded natural caves. All this natural beauty is nothing but an added bonus to the jaw-dropping adrenaline junkie pathway that has the dangerous name attached to it.

The Caminito del Rey is a pathway that was built to transport workers and building materials between two hydroelectric plants situated at either end of the Gaitanes Gorge. The path was built in 1905 out of sand and cement, held in place by metal brackets and festooned with a simple iron rail for “safety”. The pathway gained its regal name when King Alfonso walked along the Caminito and was so impressed that a plaque was erected in recognition of the path’s designer and the momentous day of his journey. During the last century, the pathway has fallen into disrepair and has undergone a full restoration, but it is still listed as one of the most dangerous hikes in the world.

El Caminito del Rey

1. Pripyat Ukraine

Pripyat is the site of one of the most notorious “ruins” of the last 100 years, and is generally what is referred to when the Chernobyl disaster is referenced. “Chernobyl” is how we reference one of the biggest man-made disasters ever recorded but Pripyat is the remaining symbol of this event. Founded on February 4, 1970, Pripyat was designated officially as an atomograd (‘the town of the atomic scientists and workers’), the 9th settlement of its kind in the former USSR. Although this was a former “hot zone”, radiation levels have dropped due to the decay of the short-lived isotopes released during the accident and tours are regularly scheduled.

Ukraine would be a tough sell for a travel agent these days, but if you are determined to see this historic site, you will begin your journey in Kiev, Ukraine’s capital, a fantastic city with a fantastic nightlife. After staging there you will travel north to the Chernobyl site after booking a tour in advance, you will need government clearance and the tour company is well equipped to ease you over any bureaucratic bumps. The most reviewed company hosting these tours is Chernobyl Tours, cost is variable depending on the size of your group and it includes transportation.

Pripyat Ukraine

8 Cities that Have Public Transit Figured Out

Remember the days when you couldn’t catch a bus past midnight, the days where the sun and rain wreaked havoc on the faded schedule taped to the post at the bus stop, and the days of the graffiti filled subway stations? When we think about public transportation these are often the memories we recall but we are here to show you that public transit systems have been taken to a new level. Replacing these memories are those of clean stations, touch screen kiosks, 24 hour service, and robots helping you on the way. These systems are fast, efficient and cost effective and most of them even have Wi-Fi. With subways, buses, trams, streetcars and bicycles; the possibilities for getting around are endless. Welcome to the new world of public transit. Sit back, relax and read on to discover the eight cities that have really excellent public transit.

8. Melbourne, Australia

Boasting the largest tram network in the world and the innovative bike share program it’s no surprise Melbourne makes the cut. The bike share program was initially affected negatively by the introduction of a mandatory helmet wearing law. Since that law, Melbourne has offered free helmets and helmet rental opportunities that has increased the use of this program. The myki card is an added bonus to this transit system. Easily purchased at over 800 retail locations, stations and ticket offices, this card calculates the lowest fare available to you every time you “touch on touch off” a train, tram or bus. Melbourne is also home to the City Circle Tram; a free historical tram experience taking you past many of Melbourne’s landmarks.

melbourne tram

7.  Vienna, Austria

Surprised to see Vienna pop up on this list? After you’ve discovered one of the most affordable, cleanest, efficient, safe and rarely overcrowded public transit systems you will change your mind. Vienna boasts a system that is made up of subways, local trains, trams and busses. Flat fare tickets that can be used for any of the above modes of transit makes it just that much easier. Tickets are easily purchased throughout the stations, at stores or even on the bus and tram. Rarely waiting more than five minutes for service and a late night bus that runs throughout the night and into the wee hours of the morning is why Vienna is the model of so many public transit systems in Europe.

Brendan Howard / Shutterstock.com
Brendan Howard / Shutterstock.com

6. Paris, France

In a city designed for exploring the “hidden” nooks and cracks, Paris does a fine job of providing ways to do exactly that. One of the greatest public transit methods Paris has put in places is Velib; the biggest bike sharing program in the world. Free for the first 30 minutes, self-serve, available 24/7 and ease of access all contribute to this overwhelmingly popular choice of transport in the city. For those non-bikers, Paris also offers the 16 line metro, commuter rail, buses, boats and the RER. Along with being one of the world’s safest and most efficient transit systems, Paris takes their public transportation very seriously and is adding to their tram with the opening of four new lines in the past two years.

paul prescott / Shutterstock.com
paul prescott / Shutterstock.com

5. Munich, Germany

The U-Bahn and the S-Bahn are both run by the Munich Transit Authority which might explain the cleanliness, safety and on time performance this public transit system prides itself on. Ease of access along with only having to validate your ticket once rather than at every transfer or stop reduces congestion on this busy system. With the central train station located next to historic downtown it’s easy to connect to the rest of Europe in a timely fashion. Not to be forgotten is the amazing fact that trains in the central area depart every two minutes. With a fare that won’t stretch your wallet, this city has truly made it easy to get around.

s-bahn and u-bahn munich

4.  Tokyo, Japan

Known as having one of the best public transportation systems in the world, Tokyo uses a combination of trains, subways and buses. It is important to note that during rush hour, Tokyo subways are often packed full, being a testament to how efficient the rail system is. Once in the station, one will notice not only the cleanliness of it but the ease of where to go with floor markings to tell you where to stand. Once on the train you will sink into your heated seat and read the digital message in both Japanese and English on what the next stop is. Tokyo’s rail system in uncanny in its reliability and punctuality. Exactly what one wants in a public transportation system.

Stephen Bures / Shutterstock.com
Stephen Bures / Shutterstock.com

3. Hong Kong, China

With approximately 90% of all travel in Hong Kong being done by mass transit it is imperative that this city has public transit figured out. Luckily for all those transit users, Hong Kong has gone above and beyond with their system. The subways system is responsible for most of this travel and their trains travel on time, every time. While on the train, don’t fret about losing that phone call because 3G cellular network is available on all commutes, even underground. The Automated People Mover in Hong Kong’s airport is also a futuristic transportation method we just have to mention. Designed to take passengers to gates, immigration, customs, baggage claim and the SkyPier; this driverless people mover is a lesson in efficiency.

Alan49 / Shutterstock.com
Alan49 / Shutterstock.com

2. Taipei, Taiwan

The Taipei MRT subway system in not only one of the most expensive systems in the world but has been voted the safest and most reliable for numerous years in a row. LED screens offer passengers times of trains in both Mandarin and English while announcements are made in four different languages. The cleanliness is unchallenged by the prohibition of eating, drinking or gum chewing in any of the stations and cars. An honorable mention must go out to the high speed train aka “the bullet” which can reach upwards of 300km/hr and connects passengers to some of the bigger cities in the western part of the island. Make sure to eat before you board as eating is also prohibited on the bullet train.

Wayne0216 / Shutterstock.com
Wayne0216 / Shutterstock.com

1. Seoul, Korea

Bigger subway cars, cleanliness, and the fact that it moves 8 million people a day is something to boast about. Coupled with the LED screens that tell passengers when the next train is coming and announcements in both Korean and English, this system is way ahead of the times. Going even one step further are the heated seats, digital touch screen kiosks in stations and colour coded buses. Free Wi-Fi in the underground stations and cars plus the addition of digital TV’s in the subway cars just seems like an added bonus. And there is one more thing that pushed them into first place; Robots that help passengers find information in the underground stations. Robots….can you believe it?

meunierd / Shutterstock.com
meunierd / Shutterstock.com