The Top Things to See and Do in New Brunswick

New Brunswick is blessed with an abundance of woodlands, a scenic coast, beautiful rivers and bustling cities. This province has everything anyone could ask for, yet is highly underrated. Tourists can come here to discover the highest tides on the Bay of Fundy, the cultural and historic capital city of Fredericton, sandy beaches, quaint seaside towns and more. From inlands to coast, this province is begging to be explored. Whether you come for a week, stay for a month or make this province your home, you shouldn’t miss out on these 7 awesome things to see and do in New Brunswick.

7. Visit Hopewell Rocks

Visitors will want to head here both for the high and low tide, where you can really appreciate the height and range of the highest tides in the world. The time span between low and high tide is 6 hours and 13 minutes, thus presenting a unique opportunity to walk on the ocean’s floor from 3 hours before low tide until 3 hours after. Many choose to see high tide first and then return later to explore the ocean floor with its coves, beaches, and flowerpot rock formations.

Others choose to rent kayaks and enjoy the unique experience of paddling around the flowerpot rocks at high tide. Keep your eyes peeled for wildlife in the area including moose, red fox, and black bears. The Interpretative Centre is the perfect interactive experience where visitors can learn why the Bay of Fundy is unique and about the surrounding landscape.

Source: Shutterstock

6. Drive the Fundy Trail Parkway

This scenic coastal drive lies northeast of Saint John, a slow-paced route that offers an abundance of lookout points, secluded beaches, a 275 ft. suspension bridge and more. Choose to drive, walk or cycle your way along the trail. This trail hugs the cliff tops above the world’s highest tides and winds its way along of the last remaining coastal wilderness areas between Florida and Labrador and is one of the best places to view wildlife.

If you choose to hike or bike, be prepared for paths and stairways, a wicked suspension footbridge, towering waterfalls and pristine beaches. There are awesome programs for the kids here too including a Fundy Trail Adventure Hunt where children can pick up a checklist at the entrance gate and go on a discovery hunt, along with daily moose callings and free guided family walks on the weekend in the summer. Discover an absolutely stunning part of this incredible province.

Source: Shutterstock

5. Visit the Market

Canada’s oldest continuing farmers market is actually located in Saint John, housed in a block-long building. This year-round market is open Monday-Saturday and offers a wide variety of local and international delicacies. At one time this city actually had six different markets but as the city grew in size and power, they realized that there was no need for six and instead centralized them into one.

The first market building was built in 1830 at Market Square and was constructed out of wood, and ended up burning down in 1837, and the second although made out of bricks burnt down in 1841. Nowadays the market building is the same one that was built in 1876, having two entrances with gates that swing closed at the end of each business day, with thing ringing on the bell. Wander through the aisles stopping to pick up delicious foods, handcrafted goods, produce, seafood, maritime crafts and more.

Source: Shutterstock

4. Watch the Reversing Rapids

The reversing rapid is a unique phenomenon created by the collision of the Bay of Fundy’s huge tides and the mighty St. John River. What happens is the tides rise and push into the St. John River gorge, actually reversing the river’s flow. Getting up close and personal with this phenomenon is the best way to witness it.

The top two choices here are zip lining above them or taking a sightseeing boat tour of the harbor where you can witness the whirlpools and falls. Or head to the Falls Restaurant observation deck of the Fallsview park to catch a glimpse of the action, if you can visit the rapids twice, once near low tide and once near high tide, you will truly be amazed.

Source: Shutterstock

3. Explore Fredericton

The capital of New Brunswick deserves to be explored on any trip here as its both rich in culture and riverside beauty. Downtown Officer’s Square is the perfect place to start exploring with its outdoor concerts, films, and theatres that are all put on for free. Head to the Beaverbrook Art Gallery or The Playhouse, or visit one of the best farmer’s markets in the area. Tour through the historic neighborhoods with an audio tour or make your way along 85km of riverfront trails.

Take the day and travel to Killarney Lake where you can splash in the freshwater, or to Macrtaquac Provincial Park. Play a round of golf at the world-class championship golf course at Kingswood or experience living history at the Kings Landing Historical Settlement. Fredericton is full of incredible activities, awesome parks and a tremendous amount of friendly locals, waiting to invite you to discover their awesome city.

Source: Shutterstock

2. Visit the Parlee Beach Provincial Park

It is one of North America’s finest beaches, boasting the warmest salt water in all of Canada. Don’t expect to just laze around all day on the sand here, unless of course, you want to, as this beach is full of activities from volleyball to swimming to sand-sculpture competitions.

This park is also home to a 190 site campground on a beautiful groomed sited complete with restaurant, canteen, amphitheater, washrooms, showers, playground and more. Located in Shediac, this Acadian community is known as the lobster capital of the world and displays the worlds largest lobster sculpture. Make sure to dine on some local seafood in this town after a long day spent on a beautiful beach.

Source: Shutterstock

1. Discover St. Andrews by the Sea

This pretty little seaside town sits just by the U.S border and offers quaint old-fashioned charm and enough activities to keep every visitor happy. If you plan on spending a night here, make sure to stay at the historic Fairmont Algonquin Hotel where there are awesome amenities including mini-golf on site, huge fire pits to roast marshmallows, an on-site pool and a huge lobby filled with games.

Take a drive to Minister’s Island during low tide, across the ocean floor and explore the historic houses, working farm or racehorse sanctuary. Take the kids to one of the most creative playgrounds in Canada where maze-like wooden structures, slides, swings, ropes and an amphitheater provide endless hours of fun. Whale watching, chocolate museum visits, sandy beaches, gardens, restaurants and more await you in this charming town.

Source: Shutterstock

7 Small East Coast Towns with Big Appeal (Canada)

The east coast of Canada is known for its charming seaside fishing villages, hospitable people, and amazingly fresh seafood. From New Brunswick all the way to Newfoundland, small towns are everywhere. Despite popular opinion that these small towns all over the same, they are in fact quite unique and different from one another in a variety of ways. Discover the birthplace of Canada, colorful floating houses, icebergs right at your fingertips and miles of endless beach in these 7 small east coast towns that offer up a big appeal to visitors.

7. Lunenburg, Nova Scotia

This town of just over 2,000 people is touted as being one of the most beautiful towns in all of Canada. The location itself is simply amazing, along with a harbor and bordered by beautiful dramatic hills. Add in the fact that this town is dotted with pastel color buildings from the 18th and 19th century and you will soon understand the draw here.

Lunenburg also happens to be a designated UNESCO World Heritage Site, winner of the prettiest painted places in Canada and located just one hour from Halifax. The downtown area buzzes with activity from art galleries to boutique shops to fresh seafood restaurants. Walkable streets, friendly people, an interesting history and some of the best lobster in the country all await you here at this small town with big appeal.

6. Twillingate, Newfoundland and Labrador

This town located on the northeast coast of Newfoundland is home to around 2,000 residents. This small fishing village features friendly locals, stunning coastline, and quiet scenic roads. The town also happens to be located right next to Iceberg Ally, a corridor of the ocean that runs down from Greenland and is home to whales, dolphins, and seals, and of course icebergs. Fishing boats, colorful fishing stages, wharves and dories dot the coast of this town.

Hiking trails, museums, beaches, coves, an astronomy observatory, a winery, lighthouse and plenty of cozy cafes set the mood for this quaint charming town. Visit in the right season (May to July) and come up close and personal with the incredible icebergs, or spot one of 22 species of whales that live in the area.

5. Cavendish, P.E.I

This small rural town located on the tiny Prince Edward Island is home to only 300 residents, give or take, although summer tourism makes that number jump up. The claim to fame here is that this particular town was home to Lucy Maud Montgomery, author of the famous Anne of Green Gables. Visitors here flock to this town to check out her home and surrounding landscape, which the books are based on. But Cavendish offers so much more than just one famous house.

Red sandstone cliffs, sand dunes, warm crystal blue waters and endless stretches of beach set the stage for a magnificent setting. Activities range from world-class golfing to deep sea fishing to touring the art galleries to parasailing or even fine dining. Treat yourself to an ice cream as you walk the quaint streets, stopping to talk to the friendly locals as they ask you how your vacation is going. After all, this is the east coast, where some of the friendliest people reside.

4. St. Andrews, New Brunswick

This charming seaside town has a population hovering around 2,000; although summertime months bring many people to the area. This dreamy little town in New Brunswick boasts scenic architecture, rich marine life, and stunning scenery. Designated as a National Historic District you can be sure that the turn-of-the-century charm awaits you, along with a slew of modern amenities.

Dine on delectable lobster rolls and the catch of the day, sink your feet into the white sand and warm ocean and don’t miss out on the art galleries and museums. The local farmer’s markets and boutiques offer handmade one of a kind creations and the downtown is bursting with independent shops. From whale watching to touring gardens to festivals; there is something happening all year round.

3. Annapolis Royal, Nova Scotia

Known as Canada’s birthplace, this small town is home to just 500 residents. If you are looking to dive into Canadian history, this is the place, as it features over 150 historic sites and heritage buildings. The town is nestled between mountain and sea offering visitors a spectacular waterfront setting for dining, shopping and staying. The town is home to St. George, Canada’s oldest street, on which you’ll also find the country’s oldest wooden house.

Guided tours of the area are a great way to learn more about the fascinating history of this town and make sure to do the National Historic District Tour and the Candlelight Graveyard Tour. A waterfront boardwalk teems with shops, a farmers market shines out with fresh produce and handmade arts and crafts and the people are as welcoming as one would expect.

2. Trinity, Newfoundland

Located three hours from St. John’s, this 18th century fishing port is home to just around 200 residents, with a slew of visitors coming to discover this charming town. Historic buildings, art galleries, museums, old churches and a beautiful scenic harbor are what draw visitors here. Hiking trails lead hikers up granite slopes and through beautiful beaches, while whales, birds, and icebergs float by in the distance.

The people of Trinity are really the forefront of what makes this place so spectacular though, known for their genuine hospitality and talent in entertainment and performing arts. Visitors should not miss out on taking the scenic walking tour where you are whisked back to the past. Make sure to stay in one of the charming B&B’s, cottages or guesthouses located throughout the town.

1. Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia

This picture perfect marine town is home to just over 900 people and sits in the perfect location, a bay with access to over 100 different islands. The surroundings are simply stunning, protected waters and magnificent vistas, perfect for sailing, kayaking, hiking, and cycling. There are 100 miles of groomed trails, world-class beaches, and islands galore to explore. The main street is lined with charming shops, boutiques and unique eateries.

Local art studios are open and invite visitors to watch as they create masterpieces, whether it is rug hooking, sculpting or painting. The town is full of 19th century architecture but what draws visitors here are the three iconic churches along Edgewater Street that are one of the most photographed views in Canada. Great scenery, welcoming locals and an abundance of things to see and do make this one awesome small town with a big appeal in Eastern Canada.

The Best Urban Parks in Canada

Canada is known for some of its incredible National Parks but often what gets overlooked in this great nation are the incredible urban parks that have popped up from coast to coast. What makes one urban park better than another? Great access to activities, varied landscapes, incredible scenery and plenty of things to see and do, are what sets these eight urban parks above the rest. From the famous Stanley Park in Vancouver to the largest urban park in Canada to lesser known parks in the east coast; here are the best urban parks in Canada.

8. Assiniboine Park, Winnipeg

This park is considered to be one of Winnipeg’s crown jewels and offers over 113 hectares of woodland and plains along the River’s south side. Attractions here include the park zoo whose star attraction is the Polar Bears and the comprehensive exhibit that they are housed in. Known to be one of the most comprehensive zoological exhibits of its kind in the world, visitors have the chance to watch the playful bears in a stimulating environments inspired by their natural habitat. The park boasts more than just the zoo though, including gardens, playgrounds, restaurants, nature trails, a steam train and more. The park conservatory boasts over 8,000 flowers, trees and plants while the Gallery Museum features local artists and a permanent Winnie the Pooh artifact collection.

Assiniboine Park, Winnipeg

7. Beacon Hill Park, Victoria

Located on Victoria’s southern shores, Beacon Hill Park is an oasis of both landscaped and natural beauty, offering spectacular views during every season. The outer rim of the park is where nature lovers flock to, to Oceanside bluffs where paragliders and kite enthusiasts often can be seen. The inner park is where visitors will find most of the activities though. Wander through the manicured gardens and over bridged streams while music drifts out of the Cameron Bandshell. Or take the kids the the miniature golfing or petting zoo. Wildlife is abundant throughout the park with over a hundred species of birds, river otters, painted turtles and more. This park also happens to have the important status of being the western terminus, the Mile “0” of the 8,000km Trans-Canada highway and so happens to be a very popular tourist photo opp.

Mile 0

6. Pippy Park, St. John’s Newfoundland

At the northern boundary of St. John’s lays one of Canada’s greatest urban parks, Pippy Park, abundant in scenery and breathtaking views. The 27-hole golf course features some of the spectacular views of both the oldest city in North America and miles of rugged coastline, chances are you might even see an iceberg or whale while walking this course. If visitors want to spend more than just a day exploring this awesome park, the campground offers 216 sites on private treed lots that are steps away from playgrounds and the Botanical Gardens. There is a plethora of scenic trails that allow visitors to explore a variety of landscapes including wetlands, rivers, parklands and more. The rare Leopard march orchid can also be spotted here in the Botanical Gardens and offers visitors a once in a lifetime opportunity to see it up close and in person.

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5. Fish Creek Provincial Park, Calgary

It is the largest urban park in all of Canada, and just so happens to be one of the best, located in the southern part of Calgary and over three times the size of Vancouver’s famous Stanley Park. Fish Creek flows the entire length of the park and joins the Bow River at the east side, offering visitors a plethora of wildlife viewing opportunities. Visitors here will be privy to 200 bird species, deer, owls, beavers and coyotes which all call this park home. One of the most popular features of the park is Sikome Lake, a man-made lake where thousands of people flock to each summer to swim. A variety of unpaved walking, hiking and bicycle trails are also prevalent throughout Fish Creek Park. Two restaurants are located here, one which offers fine-dining and the other a bakery and café and an Artisan Garden is located in the east end. There are a ton of things to see and do here and if you happen to be a resident of Calgary, consider yourself lucky that you get to enjoy this park anytime at your leisure.

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4. Rockwood Park, St. John New Brunswick

This park offers an abundance of activities to enjoy in an unspoiled setting where unusual topography and geography are prevalent. The billion years of history here can be seen in unique rock formations, caves and waterfalls and this park often refers to itself as an all-season natural amusement park. Sports enthusiasts will enjoy the opportunity for hiking, fishing. Boating, climbing, camping, golfing and mountain biking while those looking for something a little more low key can visit the Cherry Brook Zoo, located in the north section of the park. Other awesome amenities include beaches, gardens, stables, campgrounds and picnic sites, along with 890 hectares of forest and the beautiful Lily Lake.

rockwood park NB

3. High Park, Toronto

It is Toronto’s largest public park and in recent years the city has invested a lot of time, energy and money into making it one of the greatest urban parks in Canada. High Park is home to a greenhouse, zoo, restaurants, off-leash dog park and more. The signature Sakura cheery blossom trees in Hillside Gardens are the star attraction during April and May when they are in full bloom. Grenadier Pond is the place to head for fishing off the south rim while visitors who want to swim or skate can head to the designated pool and rink. From wandering through the nature trails to playing on one of many playgrounds to taking in a sport at one of the great facilities, there is certainly no shortage of things to do here.

high park

2. Mt. Royal Park, Montreal

It is the best urban park in all of Montreal and so happens to be one of the best in all of Canada, laying in the midst of Montreal island and including 200 hectares and the highest spot in the city. The park is home to over 180 species of birds and 20 mammals and enough hiking and biking paths to keep any active visitor busy. In the winter time enjoy the 20km of cross country trails, horse drawn carriage rides and an awesome tubing and tobogganing run. Other features of this impressive park include Beaver Lake, a sculpture garden, Smith House – an interpretative center, and two belvederes. Designed by famous architect Frederick Law Olmsted, who designed New York City’s Central Park, visitors can assure that there is no shortage of spectacular views of the city below and varied landscapes to explore.

mt royal

1. Stanley Park, Vancouver

It is known for being one the best parks around the world, and recently held the title of “best park in the world” by Trip Advisor, therefore no trip to Vancouver should be complete without visiting Stanley Park. This lush green space covers over 400 hectares of parkland and west coast rainforest. Things to do at this park include visiting the indoor/outdoor aquarium, walking the 8.8km stretch of seawall and discovering the Brockton Point’s First Nations totem poles. The park is also absolutely loaded with gardens, beaches, landmarks, sculptures and lookout points, along with a golf course and a Lost Lagoon. Whether you spend an hour, a day or three days exploring this park, one thing is for sure – it is easy to understand why this is truly the best urban park in Canada.

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The Bucket List’s 13 Canadian Towns You Must Visit

The common old saying, ‘the best things come in small packages’ holds true when it comes to Canadian small towns. Visiting small towns isn’t normally at the top of our bucket list, but we’ve come up with a list of great towns that are perfect just the way they are, which is often quiet and out of the way, typically passed by on highways and main roads, tucked neatly away on the outskirts of a city. This list is a baker’s dozen compiled small towns to love, we’ve covered all our bases including one from each province and territory. What are you waiting for? Get going!

13. Nelson, British Columbia

For a town of under 10,000 people there is a whole lot going on in Nelson. The skiing in the Kootenay Rockies is sensational. When it’s time for water skis, Lake Kootenay offers any activity you want on and under the water. There are thermal and natural baths and less than an hour away, as is the beginning of the province’s fabulous wine country. Nelson is something of an artistic community with a surprising cache of Victorian, Queen Anne and Beaux Arts architecture. The town website claims more restaurants per capita than San Francisco. It also likely has more hippies per capita as the counterculture is bred by American draft dodgers during the Vietnam War and continues on today.

Nelson British Columbia

12. Legal, Alberta

A proud little town whose website says it “puts unity back into community”. It’s close enough to be considered a suburb of Edmonton, but it retains its separate identity with its old rural charm intact. Still bilingual, it was founded as a French-speaking settlement in 1894, before Alberta was a province and less than a decade after French Canada’s champion Louis Riel was hanged for treason. The stop signs still say ‘Arret/Stop’. Legal is renowned for its 28 French murals and its summer Fete Au Village, or Town Festival.

Photo by: Town of Legal
Photo by: Town of Legal

11. Forget, Saskatchewan

This town is nothing like it sounds, rather it’s sure to give you an unforgettable experience. It is a one of those places through the Canadian and American Midwest that serves as a reminder that French explorers were the first Europeans to pass through and that many of the early post-Confederation settlers were from Quebec and their descendants still proudly call themselves Saskinoises, as did Canada’s first woman to serve as Governor General, Jeanne Sauvé. Despite its minuscule size (at last count 104) it has become known as an artists’ colony. The old Rectory built in 1904 is now The Ananda Arthouse.  Its French Catholic roots are evident in the name of a much-praised hangout and kitchen called The Happy Nun. And should you go there, please recall it’s pronounced for-JAY.

Saskatchewan

10. Flin Flon, Manitoba

There are few more quintessentially Canadian towns than Flin Flon.  A sub-Arctic hardworking mining community with a stellar hockey history. Six hundred miles northwest of Winnipeg in the Manitoba Lake District, it boasts a big trout festival and wilderness activities in summer and with the exception of downhill skiing, a full range of winter sports. It is one of Canada’s hockey factories, having sent a number of big stars to the NHL, including Bobby Clarke, Reggie Leach and Blaine Stoughton. And there is of course its iconic name with a minor literary pedigree, the only town named after Josiah Flintabbatey Flonatin, a character in a 1905 science fiction book The Sunless City. The venerable American cartoonist Al Capp was so intrigued by the story, he created the statue of the town’s namesake that still stands.

Flin Flon, Manitoba

9. Port Hope, Ontario

Sixty miles east of Toronto, Port Hope is a pretty little town with a lovely and well preserved 19th century downtown. The Capitol Theatre opened in 1930 and is one of a dwindling collection of ‘atmospheric theatres’, an ornate style movie house that resembles a palace. It has been cited for the province’s Community Leadership award for exemplary “leadership in heritage conservation and promotion”. The antique shopping is renowned as is the fly-fishing in the Ganaraska River. A timeless scene of Victorian Ontario.

Photo by: John Vetterli via Flickr
Photo by: John Vetterli via Flickr

8. Hudson, Quebec

Hudson is a picturesque, historic place set on the Lac des Deux Montagnes that dates back to New France and celebrates its 150th birthday as a town in 2015. Now it’s also known as where the late Jack Layton called home. Forty miles west of Montreal, it has long been known as a wealthy Anglophone enclave with a Yacht Club dating back to 1909 and a polo club from 1901.  It re-established in the 1990’s as the Club Nacional and is was well-known for its star players that included some of the great Montreal Canadiens from the teams that won five Stanley Cups in the 1980’s. Now it has a nice arts scene, great antiques. It’s not a place you would spend a week, but perfect as a weekend destination or day trip. It just might even leave you trying to figure out ways to move there for good.

Photo by: Hudson Yacht Club
Photo by: Hudson Yacht Club

7. Victoria-by-the-Sea, Prince Edward Island

When it comes to flat out, good old fashioned small town charm, it’s very hard to beat the Maritimes. Victoria lies on the island’s south coast just 20 miles from Charlottetown. It was once an affluent, busy trading port and the pretty houses and stores don’t seem to have changed much, except for fresh coats of brightly colored paint. Another charming little (population: 200) place that attracts artists and craftspeople. The Victoria Playhouse has been written up by no less than the New York Times. The mandatory red sand beaches and Lighthouse museum are present and accounted for. Sea kayaking in the Northumberland Strait is the main offshore activity. The town website almost brags that when the Trans Canada Highway passed the town by, so did the malls, fast food joints and tourist traps.

Victoria-by-the-sea, PEI

6. Saint Andrews, New Brunswick

The town was settled by Loyalists from Maine in 1783. Thirteen of the streets are named after the offspring of George lll (aka Mad King George) not to mention King, Queen and Prince of Wales Streets. Like much of the region, its economic apogee passed with The Steam Age. After decades of bad times, the onset of the railway plus, the ocean breezes and natural beauty, brought well-to-do visitors seeking respite from the heat and filth of the industrial northeast. Saint Andrews became the country’s first resort and was rewarded for its economic stagnation with unspoiled downtown and surroundings that became their major industry and engine of growth.  The legendary Algonquin Hotel remains a wonderful example of CPR hotel architecture (or ‘Parkitecture). Kingsbrae Gardens is an award winning masterpiece of horticulture and whale watching has been added to the array of watery attractions.

Photo by: Douglas LeMoine via Flickr
Photo by: Douglas LeMoine via Flickr

5. Mahone Bay, Nova Scotia

Another coastal gem, Mahone Bay was founded in 1754 and was a shipbuilding center for over a century. The shelter of the Bay encourages sailors, kayakers, and fishers to explore the 365 islands that dot the waters of Mahone Bay, including Oak Island, with its legend of buried treasure. It’s a summertime boom town, attracting visitors for its beaches, biking and ski trails, along with a rich history and oceanfront location. Not to mention that fresh, fresh seafood.

Mahone Bay NS

4. Trinity, Newfoundland and Labrador

Fisherman were summering in relative safety in trinity bay since the early 16th century. It is full of heritage buildings of saltbox architecture dating from the 1850’s. All the towns on this list are scenic, but only The Rock combines mint conditioned, brightly colored historic buildings with rugged beauty of the unforgivingly harsh Newfoundland rock face which is a base for hiking and boat tours to see whales and icebergs. Its preserved perfection of houses from the 1850’s attracted the makers of The Shipping News and there are tours of where the famous cast shot scenes and stayed, some of them were so taken by the land and people, they bought houses or cottages nearby!

Photo by: Brian Summers via Flickr
Photo by: Brian Summers via Flickr

3. Dawson, Yukon

You can still pan for gold and have the famous Sour Toe cocktail. For a more satisfying taste – attempt to make it yourself! It was parodied by a Dawson banker named Robert W Service in the “Ice Worm Cocktail” a story of a gullible Englishman who downed one with great trepidation and comic results. The romance of the Gold Rush, even more than a century come and gone remains. Such was the transient wealth, it was called the Paris of the North. Heritage buildings from its 15 minutes of wealth and fame abound. And yes, you can see the can-can girls at Gambling Gerties, but it’s not a one-trick pony. Cruise the Yukon River and/or hike 1700 feet up the Midnight Dome and take in the views of it and the Klondike Valley. Parks Canada has a nice tour from Crocus Bluff to Service’s cabin in the hills, conducted with excerpts from his legendary poetry.

Josef Hanus / Shutterstock.com
Josef Hanus / Shutterstock.com

2. Rankin Inlet, Nunavut

In Inuktitut, it’s called Kangiqtiniq – ᑲᖏᖅᖠᓂᖅ, meaning ‘deep inlet’. It has become the gateway to the territory for civil servants, mining execs, scientists and adventure travel aficionados, hence the cell phone service and golf courses not common to the rest of the region. There is a thriving Inuit art scene, especially in ceramics and carving. For exploring the stunning, pristine Iqalugaarjuup Nunanga (‘the land around the river of little fishes’) Territorial Historic Park has hiking, fishing and fauna that you won’t see south of 90 degrees north. There are also habitations and graveyards from the 13th century. To celebrate spring Pakaluk Time there is a festival which includes music dancing and the famous, unique Inuit sport competitions.

Photo by: Electronker via Flickr
Photo by: Electronker via Flickr

1. Fort Smith, Northwest Territories

Fort Smith deserves a place on the bucket list if for no other reason than it being a place that is a gateway to the remote, spectacular World Heritage Site, Wood Buffalo National Park. The northern boreal plain and forest is home to endangered species like wood bison, whooping cranes and peregrine falcons. Seemingly endless acres of pristine natural beauty that are a paradise for the outdoor enthusiast. Its name in Chipewyan is Thebacha or ‘beside the rapids’, and those rapids on the Slave River are a major attraction for white water buffs today.

Photo by: Ansgar Walk via Wikimedia Commons
Photo by: Ansgar Walk via Wikimedia Commons