YMI Cultural Center

39 S Market St
Asheville NC 28801
1 Reviews
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Opening Hours

  • Tue: 10am-5pm
  • Wed: 10am-5pm
  • Thu: 10am-5pm
  • Fri: 10am-5pm

Payment

  • PayPal

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The YMI Cultural Center in downtown Asheville offers a historic location for events, cultural exhibits, weddings, and seminars as well as ongoing community forums, cultural festivals, and literacy programs. The cultural center also offers visitors a glimpse of African American history through artwork and photographs.

Parking and public transportation at the YMI Cultural Center
Parking for the YMI Cultural Center is available on the street in metered parking spaces or in the Biltmore Avenue Garage. Asheville transit has bus stops along Biltmore Avenue.

Best and worst time to go to the YMI Cultural Center
The YMI Cultural Center is open to the public on Tuesdays through Fridays, 12 p.m. to 4 p.m. The center is open at other times for special events.

Admission to the YMI Cultural Center
There is no admission charge to the YMI Cultural Center; however, some events might require tickets or separate admission.

Must see/do at the YMI Cultural Center
Whether attending an event or visiting the YMI Cultural Center, visitors have the opportunity to speak with volunteers and staff, who are available to connect individuals interested in getting more involved in the region's multi-cultural community with organizations that are active in creating culturally-diverse activities for the community.

Other places to visit near the YMI Cultural Center
The YMI Cultural Center is located conveniently to dozens of downtown shops and restaurants along Biltmore Avenue. The center is just a couple blocks away from Pack Square where the Colburn Earth Science Museum and the Asheville Art Museum are located.

Insider tip for visitors to the YMI Cultural Center
The building that houses the YMI Cultural Center is a historic icon in Asheville. Completed in 1893, the YMI (Young Men's Institute) was constructed under the direction of George Vanderbilt to provide educational, spiritual, and cultural support for the African American construction workers employed by the Biltmore Estate.

Author's bio: Carolyn B. Fraiser is a freelance journalist, photographer, and publications specialist in Asheville, North Carolina. Follow her on Twitter @carolynbfraiser.