Bruce Lee's Grave

1554 15th Ave E
Seattle WA 98102
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Martial arts fans from around the world make the trek to see the graves of martial arts legend Bruce Lee and his son Brandon Lee, who are buried side-by-side at Seattle's Lake View Cemetery. Flowers, coins, and other gifts continually cover their graves.

Parking and public transportation at Bruce Lee's Grave
Lake View Cemetery is located in the Capitol Hill neighborhood of Seattle, a short distance east of Interstate 5. You can drive into the cemetery and park on narrow lanes near the grave sites. King County Metro buses also serve the area around the cemetery, but be prepared for a bit of a hike, as the cemetery is 285 acres and the grave is near the back of the cemetery.

Best and worst time go to Bruce Lee's Grave
More people gather when it's a nice, sunny day in Seattle. If you want to brave a little rain, you'll probably encounter fewer people.

Admission to Bruce Lee's Grave
The cemetery is open daily 9am to dusk.

Must see/do at Bruce Lee's Grave
Many people leave flowers or other gifts at the grave site. Visitors report the place has a serene feeling and stays amazingly clean. So, pay your respects and be respectful of the location.

Other places to visit near Bruce Lee's Grave
Lake View Cemetery is also the final resting place of other famous people, including some of the early pioneers who settled Seattle and Princess Angeline, daughter of Chief Sealth, who Seattle was named after. When you leave the cemetery, Volunteer Park is just south. You can enjoy the natural setting of the park or visit the Volunteer Park Conservatory or the Seattle Asian Art Museum, both located in the park.

Insider tip for visitors to Bruce Lee's Grave
Lake View Cemetery is a large place and doesn't have signs pointing to Bruce Lee's grave. As you enter the cemetery, you'll see a hill with a flagpole. Go toward the flagpole, and look for the grave on the lower east side of the hill, near a tree and some bushes. Visitors often report finding the grave by looking for a gathering of people.

Author's bio: Carol Wiley is a freelance writer in Seattle, WA. She writes about health, business, and travel, among other topics. She also writes case studies and web content for businesses.